Daniel F. Davenport, Postmaster at Americus, Sumter County, Georgia

Daniel F. Davenport, Postmaster at Americus, Sumter County, Georgia. Daniel Frederick Davenport has been identified in a business way with Sumter County for over thirty years, and his family is one of prominence in this section of Georgia.

Americus, Sumter County, Georgia; Post Office 1900

Americus, Sumter County, Georgia; Post Office 1900

For more on Davenport family members see History of the Battle of King’s Mountain and it’s Heroes: Part XV October-November, 1780

He was born at Americus September 8, 1860, a son of Walter T. and Mary Elizabeth (Frederick) Davenport. His great-great-grandfather Doctor Thomas Davenport II born 1721 King William, Virginia, died 1780 Cumberland, Virginia, was a Infantry soldier in the Revolutionary war and for his services was granted a large tract of land in Virginia. He married Lucy Ransome. Thomas Davenport IV, grandfather of D. F. Davenport, was born 1754 in Halifax County, Virginia, and owned an extensive plantation, which he employed chiefly for the growing of tobacco. He served for ten years as a member of Congress from Virginia and was one of the leading men of that state. He was married to Jane Lipscomb. Thomas Davenport III was great-grandfather of D. F. Davenport, he also served as a private in the Revolutionary War, he was married to Betsey Guerrant.

Walter T. Davenport was born in 1817 in Halifax County, Virginia, was a school teacher in early life, teaching both in Virginia and in Tennessee, and in 1842 he located in Sumter County, Georgia. He was one of the pioneer business men at Americus, first engaged in the dry goods and afterwards in the hardware business and during the war he was commissioned a colonel of militia and performed the additional duties of tithing agent.  After the war he engaged in the insurance business and the drug business, and remained a resident of Americus until his death in 1910. He was a man of sterling qualities and left a good name for deeds performed in church and state. Walter Davenport married Mary Frederick, who was born in South Carolina, a daughter of Daniel Frederick. Daniel Frederick was one of the pioneer plantation owners in Houston County, Georgia, but afterwards moved to Macon County where he lived to be over eighty years of age. Mary Frederick was educated at Wesleyan College, and was one of the first to enter that institution. She died in Americus at the age of sixty-three. She was active in the Methodist Episcopal Church and a woman of benevolence, of fine character and greatly beloved both in her family and in a large community of friends. The Frederick family was especially prominent in promoting the growing of fruit in their section of Georgia, and Mrs. Mary Frederick Davenport was also noted as a horticulturist, and helped to bring fruit growing into high favor in Sumter County. Walter and Mary Davenport were the parents of eleven children, all but two reaching their majority.

Daniel Frederick Davenport attended the schools of Americus and for two years was a student at Auburn, Alabama. He left college in the senior year and at once became associated with his father and brother in the drug business at Americus. He was in that line for twenty-eight consecutive years, and in 1910 he engaged in the real estate and insurance business associated with his brother, James A. Davenport. On September 15, 1913, Mr. Davenport became postmaster at Americus, and has since devoted his best time and energies to the capable administration of that office. Mr. Davenport also held numerous patents for medicine.

In the meantime his interests have extended to the various affairs, and from early life he was much interested in the local military and during 1881-82 served as first sergeant of Company B at Auburn, Alabama, and in 1883-85 was first sergeant of the Americus Light Infantry. In politics he is a democrat, and is a member of the Patriotic Order Sons of America and the Sigma Alpha Epsilon college fraternity. He is active in the Methodist Church and is now assistant superintendent of the First Methodist Sunday School.

On March 21, 1889, at Americus he married Miss Leila B. Crisp, daughter of Hon. Charles F. Crisp, who rose to eminence in our national affairs and was especially noted during his term as speaker of the National House of Representatives. Mrs. Davenport has inherited largely the concise manner of writing and expression which was characteristic of the late Speaker Crisp. She was educated in the public schools at Americus and in the Woman’s College at Staunton, Virginia. Mr. and Mrs. Davenport have two children: Clara Belle and Mary Ella. The daughter, Clara Belle, was married April 16, 1912, to Mr. W. G. Hooks.

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Genealogical History of the Richmond Family

The Richmond Family from Americana, American historical magazine, Volume 9 By National American Society; December 1914

Traits associated with Richmond family members:
The Richmond family are well known for their generous mannerisms. Due to the families historscope being aligned with Jupiter, the planet of charisma, The Richmonds can often be complex and imaginative. They reflect changes in their own surroundings and can often become over optimistic and materialistic.

ACCORDING to the best authorities in genealogical research, the Richmond Family that has been so conspicuously identified with English history for nearly eight centuries, and whose members have acquitted themselves at all times bravely and brilliantly, had its origin in Brittany, France. Like most names of families, in England as well as elsewhere, the word was originally a designation of place. In its native language it was derived from the words riche and monte or monde. There is now a prominent French family of the name of Richemonte that sprang from the same stock, and it has been noted as an interesting example of heredity that its members bear striking resemblance to those of the English and American Richmond lines. After the name was adopted as a surname it was variously spelled, in the early English history of the family, as Rychemonde, Richemount, Richemonte, etc.

Richmond Upon Thames, England

                                   Richmond Upon Thames, England

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Richmond’s from whom the American branch was derived have been traced in English history to the time of the Norman invasion. For several centuries these early progenitors, generation after generation were notably associated with the great events of the kingdom, and much of their early history was closely entwined with that of the famous Richmond Castle. From Richmondshire, where the English family originated, branches of it spread to other parts of England, in which its members achieved much distinction and became foremost in the affairs of their successive generations. One of these renowned British lines was that of Ashton-Keynes, whence came John Richmond, who emigrated to America in 1635 and founded the family that has enjoyed prominence in various branches on this side of the Atlantic during more than two and one-half centuries. Although some authorities express uncertainty as to whether John Richmond was born in Ashton-Keynes, Radborne, or Christian Malford, he was certainly of Wiltshire. There is no doubt among genealogists who have given attention to the derivation of the English stem that the Wiltshire Richmond’s were descended from the Yorkshire Richmond’s, who came to England with William the Conqueror. Representatives of the family were first settled in Yorkshire on lands given to them by the king. In a later generation a younger branch went over into Wiltshire, and from that cadet line came the American offshoot.

Richmond Crest a silver spear tilting

        Richmond Crest a silver spear tilting

Richmond-coat-of-arms2

In the northwest corner of Yorkshire, England, in the district of Richmondshire, stands Richmond, the ancient market and parish town, two hundred and thirty-four miles from London. Richmond is famous for the ruins of its great castle, which, as well as the town, was built by the first earl, Alan the Bed, son of Hoel, count of Brittany. The place derives its name—etymologically, rich mount or rich hill,—from the beauty of the elevation on which it rests. In the early Norman times it was the chief locality and feudal capital of the district of Richmondshire. Until the end of the feudal system the Richmond Castle, which dominated the town, both as regards its location and in the fact that it gave general distinction to the place, was one of the strongest inland fortresses existing anywhere in England. The earls of Richmond, who also were dukes of Brittany, were the wealthiest and most powerful among the nobles of Yorkshire.

Richmond-coat-of-arms1

No section of Great Britain is more picturesquely beautiful than the country immediately surrounding the town of Richmond. Bold rocks are everywhere conspicuous in the landscape, clothed with trees and shrubs. From the hills about are charming prospects in all directions. The castle, which still makes the town noted, although situated one hundred feet above the Swale River, seems from the hills to be sunken in a deep valley. The eye ranges over the extensive plains of the vale of York far away to the eastern and western moors.

Richmond castle1

Richmond Castle in Richmond, North Yorkshire, England, stands in a commanding position above the River Swale, close to the centre of the town of Richmond. It was originally called Riche Mount, ‘the strong hill’. The castle was constructed from 1071 onwards as part of the Norman Conquest of Saxon England as the Domesday Book of 1086 refers to ‘a castlery’ at Richmond in that year.

Richmond_Castle2

Richmond Castle was not mentioned by name in the Domesday Book, and no reference to it is found in the early annals. In the recapitulation of the Domesday Book the statement is made that Earl Alan has one hundred and ninety-nine manors in his castelary, which goes to show that the castle was then in existence. It is a matter of record that during the life of William the Conqueror Earl Alan gave the chapel from the Castle of Richmond to the Abbey of St. Mary of York, which he had founded. Accordingly the castle must have been in existence at the date of the Survey, inasmuch as that was only a year before the death of William.

Richmond_Castle3

Situated on the south side of the town, Richmond Castle overlooks the Swale River which runs in a deep valley at the foot of the hill where the ruined structure stands. Between the river and the site of the castle, and about six hundred feet perpendicularly above the bed of the Swale, is a walk from eight to nine feet wide. From this walk one gets a sense of the great elevation of the site and the castle above the immediately surrounding land. Farther above the walk some forty or fifty feet is the ground on which the castle stands. On the side toward the river the elevation is faced with massive stones made to resemble a cliff of natural rock. On the eastern side of the castle yard the Swale also skirts the property. At the latter spot, however, the descent is not as precipitous as on the south; there is a downward gentle slope to the river for a distance of some forty to fifty yards. The west side of the once almost impregnable fortress faces a deep valley, the ascent from which to the castle is exceedingly steep. Approach from this point, in the period when the castle was indeed a fortress, must have been well-nigh impossible. On the north the site of the castle is elevated only slightly above the level of the town, and it was from this side only that it could have been accessible to an attacking enemy in the good old feudal times.

Richmond_Castle4

The castle even yet appears majestic in its ruins. The keep, of which the shell has been preserved almost entire, is about a hundred feet high, and the walls are eleven feet thick. A great stone column supports the lower story in the middle, and from it spring circular arches closing the top. A broad staircase extends upward, but now reaches only the first chambers, the rest being dilapidated, as the floors of the two upper rooms have long since fallen in. In this keep is a well of excellent water. Ruins of several other parts of the castle remain. In the southeastern corner of the area is a great tower, in which is a dismal dungeon thirteen or fourteen feet deep, and undoubtedly designed as a place of confinement. The grounds about the castle are some six acres in extent, and over them sheep now peacefully graze. The mighty edifice which centuries ago sustained the shock of hostile invasion, was the defense of prince and province, and resounded with the gaiety of multitudes is now only a mass of ruins that make a picturesque object in a landscape of inimitable beauty. fn1 Thomas Allen’s “History of York”

Richmond Castle was built by Alan the Red, duke of Brittany, who was a near relative of William the Conqueror. The records give several different accounts of the beginning of this family and the founding of the earldom of Richmond. “Alan, Dux of Brittany, the sprightly young gentleman who, in 1075, besieged the Conqueror while he was besieging the city of Dol,” “for the release of that potent monarch, who abandoned his tents and baggage to get out of the way, obtained the fair hand of the Conqueror’s daughter Constance, with the magnificent honor of Richmond. ‘The nuptials were celebrated with great pomp, and the bride was dowered with all the lands of Chester, once the possession of the unfortunate Earl Edwin, who had formerly been contracted to one of his sisters.’ ” Thus writes one of the chroniclers of the founder of this noble family. fn2 “Some Historic Mansions of Yorkshire” by W. Wheater

Says another historian of Alan the Red, “He was kinsman of William, duke of Normandy, and accompanied that prince in his expedition to England and was rewarded with the land of the Saxon Earl Edwin, which consisted of no less than nearly two hundred manors and townships. This donation was made A. D. 1070, at the time when William was employed in the siege of York, which the said Edwin, earl of Chester, and the Northumbriam Earls Morcar and Waltheof, bravely defended against him.” fn3 Thomas Allen’s “History of York”

Richmond-coat-of-arms3 London

Edwin was the earl of Mercia; Morcar was his brother and Waltheof was the governor of York. Together they defended the town against the besiegers for more than six months. Another historian puts it in this fashion: “William was so pleased with the great prowess of Alan that for his military services he created him an earl by investure with sword and noble dignity.” fn4 Wheater’s “Historic Mansions of Yorkshire.”

Richmond-France

Alan, duke of Brittany, who founded the Richmond line, was not a son or nephew of William the Conqueror, as some authorities have asserted, but was his second cousin. The first earl of Richmond was not Alan Fergeant. He and his brother Eudo were grandsons of Conan Tortus. Eudo had six sons, among whom were Alan Rufus, Alan Niger, and Stephen. Alan Rufus was the first earl of Richmond, but dying without issue Alan Niger succeeded to the title, being duke of Brittany as well as earl of Richmond.

For several generations the earldom and Richmond Castle remained in the possession of the descendants of its founder. In the succeeding centuries it was given to other owners and attracted again and again by the sovereign. In 1436 the earldom reverted to the crown and continued in possession of the king until Edwin, half-brother of Henry VI., was created earl of Richmond. His wife was the celebrated Margaret of Richmond, and their son, who succeeded to the throne as Henry VEL, took the inheritance of Richmond and kept it for his life. In 1525 Henry VIII. conferred the earldom upon his natural son, Henry Fitzroy, with the title, which was then created, of duke of Richmond. Henry Fitzroy died without issue and the title slept until 1613, when the earldom was revived by James I. The title and estate are now held by the Lenox family. They were conferred upon Charles Lenox, the illegitimate son of Charles II., who was created first duke of Richmond in 1675.

Richmond-coat-of-arms4

Thus the title has experienced numerous vicissitudes, and the lineages of various noble families, totally unrelated to one another, at least in primary respects, and especially unrelated to the true Richmond lineage of original descent, have become associated with it by the circumstance of purely arbitrary creations in the course of the centuries.

Richmond of New Zealand

                  Richmond of New Zealand

Concerning Alan the Red, the Battle Abbey Roll says: “Alain le Roux or Alan the Red, son of Eudo, count of Brittany, ‘in his very youth was a little famous for his valor.’ He led the division of the Conqueror’s army comprising the men of Brittany and Maine, that formed the left wing of the Norman army at Hastings, October 14, 1066. He was granted immense manors in Yorkshire, which became the great honor of Richmond, the name given to the soke or manorial lands, known in the Saxon language as Gilling. The Castle of Richmond is thus associated with the immediate origin of the surname and family of Richmond. ”

Richmond of Massachusetts

Richmond of Massachusetts

“Le roy servit et ania et il bien le guerdona; Richmond li dona el north Bon Chastel et bel fort en jjlusieurs en Engleterre li rois de donna sa terre.” fn5 “The Battle Abbey Roll” by the dushess of Cleveland, vol iii, p. 81

Conan IV., earl of Richmond, was born in July, 1138. He succeeded to the title as the fifth earl, March 30, 1146, and married Margaret, a sister of Malcolm IV., king of Scotland. His daughter Constance, countess of Richmond, was born in 1163. She was patroness of St. Mary’s Abbey, York; Jowauex Abbey; Rowney Nunnery, County Hertford; Abbey of Carnoet and Coetmaleon; she died September 4, 1201.

The ancient coat of arms of the Richmond Family (A. D. 1066) is Gules, three bars gemeles or, a chief argent. Motto: Resolve well and persevere. These arms are now borne by the Cumberland Richmond’s. According to Burke’s “General Armoury,” the arms of the Yorkshire Richmond’s are Two bars gemeles or, a chief argent.

Richmond-Webb-Pulleyne Coat of Arms

                            Richmond-Webb-Pulleyne Coat of Arms

The later coat of arms of the Richmond’s, to which the family of Richmond, alias Webb of Stewkly, Buckinghamshire, and of Redborn and Wiltshire, are entitled, is Argent, a cross patonce fleury azure, between four mullets gules. Crest—a tilting spear argent, headed or, broken in three parts, one piece erect, the other two in saltire, enfiled with a ducal coronet. Motto—Resolve well and persevere. One family substitutes for the four mullets in the coat of arms four estoiles.

According to Burke’s “Seats and Arms,” the crest was won by Sir Philip Richmond by a feat of arms in single combat with a Saracen prince during the crusades, before Jerusalem, in the presence of Richard L, Coeur de Lion. The ducal coronet in the crest may have come from the family being of lineal descent from Edward L, or it may have been derived from Alan Rufus, the first earl of Richmond, or from some other ducal alliance in later generations. Authorities differ on this point.

The ancestors of the American Richmonds were, if tradition may be credited, related to Alan Rufus the first earl, who built the castle. They were not in direct line from Alan, but for several successive generations were lords of the manor and constables of the castle owned by their noble relative. That they were originally of royal descent is not much questioned by English genealogists. Francis Thackeray, uncle of William Makepeace Thackeray, was descended from the Richmond’s of Wiltshire. He compiled a record of the Ashton-Keynes-Radborn branch, which corresponded with the recognized English ancestry of the American branch, except that he came to the conclusion that the American Richmonds descended through Roald, son of Roaldus. On the contrary, General Plantagenet-Harrison asserts his confident belief that the American line descended from Alan, son of Roaldus, le Ennase, claiming that his son Roald had no children. fn6. Allen’s “History of Yorkshire.”
A generation ago Colonel John Richmond Webb, of the Wiltshire Richmond’s, said that he “could prove lineal descent from Edward I. and that his first ancestor, Roaldus de Richmond, rode by the side of William the Conqueror at Hastings field.” He added, “We were gentlemen when the Churchill’s were horse-boys.”

First of record in the line of English ancestors leading to the American Richmond Family, of which Dean Richmond was the foremost representative in the last generation, was.

Roaldus Musard de Richmond, who was with William the Conqueror at Hastings. He was one of the most powerful leaders accompanying the Norman invader into England in 1066.

Hasculfus Musard de Richmond, son of the preceding, held in demesne Keddington and Chilworth, Oxfordshire, Stainbury, Gloucestershire, and other lordships at the time of the General Survey, according to Dugdale.

Roaldus de Richmond, le Ennase, son of the preceding, was second constable of Richmond Castle under Alan in., earl of Richmond; he was seized of lands in Skeeby and Croft, by the gift of King Henry, who likewise gave him the manor of Pickhall, and other holdings, which he in turn gave in marriage with a daughter to Jolanus de Neville. He was lord of Burton, Aidborough, and most of his uncle Emsart’s lands, by a grant of King Stephen, Emsart being the first constable of Richmond. He founded an abbey on his manor of Easby in honor of St. Agatha in 1152, and there he was buried with his wife, Graciana.

Sir Alan, son of Roald de Richmond, was the third constable of Richmond Castle. In the first year of the reign of Richard L, 1189, he owed the king two hundred marks for the custody of the castle. In the fourth year of the reign of Richard L, 1193, he paid ten marks and owed one hundred and ninety. In the third year of the reign of Richard I., he as surety for Walter de Lasselles. In the second year of the reign of John, 1201, he gave the king three hundred marks, and three palfreys to be constable of Richmond Castle, to hold the same for himself and his heirs. Soon after he was diseased, but in the ninth year of John, 1208, he gave the king two hundred marks and four palfreys to have the castle again and with it the king’s letters patent granting him military jurisdiction.

Sir Roald de Richmond, son of the preceding, was the fourth constable of Richmond Castle. In 1208 King John gave to him various lands, including the manors of Caldewell, Croft, Kipling, and others, and also a mill and lands in Skeeby. The letters patent granted these lands to him and his heirs forever. He entailed the manors of Burton, Aldeburgh, and Croft upon his son Roald in the latter part of the twenty-fourth year of the reign of Henry III., 1240.

Alan Richmond de Croft, son of the preceding, received from his brother the manor of Burton. He claimed lands in Roppele, Clareworth, Wurthington, and Newland, county of Lincoln, in right of his wife, in the forty-third year of the reign of Henry HI., 1259. He married Mathilda, daughter and coheir of Peter de Goldington and coheir of Simon de Roppele, lord of Roppele, Lincoln County, of the time of Edward I.

Sir Roald Richmond de Croft, son of the preceding, received from his uncle Roald the manors of Caldwell and Croft. He died in the forty-sixth year of the reign of Henry III., 1262. One authority (fn7 “Honores de Richmond,” Gales.) makes this Sir Roald to have been the son of Sir Roaldus de Richmond, fifth constable, brother to Alan, son of Roald de Croft. Sir Roald Richmonde de Croft married Isabella, daughter and heir of Robert, son of Osanna de Langthwayt, by Isabella his wife.

Eudo de Richmond, son of the preceding, had possessions in Staynwriggis, county of York.

Elyas de Richmond, son of the preceding lived during the reign of Edward III. (1327-77).

Elyas de Richmond, son of the preceding, lived during the reigns of Edward III. and Richard H. (1327-99). His brother, Richard de Richmond, succeeded him, and married Elizabeth, daughter of William de Burgh, lord of Burgh. Upon Richard and his wife Elizabeth William de Burgh entailed the manor of Burgh near Catterick, County York, in the twenty-third year of the reign of Edward III. (1350).

Thomas de Richmond, son of Richard de Richmond and his wife Elizabeth, was living in the times of Richard, Henry IV., and Henry V.

William de Richmond, son of the preceding, lived at Draycott. He married, about 1430, Alice, daughter and heiress of Thomas and Elizabeth (Nicholas) Webb of Draycott, Wilts County. Upon his marriage he assumed the name of Webb and quartered the Webb arms.

William Richmond, alias Webb of Draycott, son of the preceding, married Joan Ewen, daughter of John Ewen of Draycott. His will was dated April 24, 1502.

William Richmond, alias Webb of Stewkley Grange, Bucks County, married, 1st, Dorothy Lymings, daughter of John Lymings of Notts County, and 2d, Marjory Choke, daughter of John Choke of Shelborne, Wilts County. He was living in Wilts in the reign of Henry VIII., for he is recorded as having bought lands there in 1541 and 1545.

Edmund Richmond, alias Webb of Durnford, Wilts County, was living in 1575. He married Mary Weare, daughter of Robert Weare, alias Brown of Marlborough.

Henry Richmond, alias Webb, son of the preceding, lived at Christian Malford, Wilts County. He was married four times and had twenty-five children. From this Henry Richmond are descended the Richmond’s of Ashton-Keynes, England. The manor of four hundred acres, and the entire village of Ashton-Keynes, once belonged to this branch of the family. In the eighteenth century the manor house was the home of Oliffe Richmond. In 1768, by marriage of Bridget Richmond (granddaughter of Oliffe Richmond), to Edward Nichols, the property passed into the possession of the Nichols Family, and in 1856 it was sold to the duke of Cleveland.

John Richmond, eldest son of the preceding, was an officer in the Civil War between King Charles and the parliament. The story is current in the annals of the family that there were two brothers, John and Henry, who had engaged in this war, one of them being with King Charles and the other a soldier of Cromwell. The celebrated Rev. Leah Richmond, author and rector of Turvey, Bedfordshire, wrote much concerning his ancestry, and in one of his manuscript letters is recorded this tradition concerning the two brothers:

“On the night preceding one of the engagements, Henry, his brother, went into the camp of the other army, eluding the vigilance of the sentry, and reached John’s tent, in the hope of enjoying an affectionate interview, previously to the uncertain events of the morrow. On entering the tent, John, alarmed at the sudden appearance of a stranger, as he conceived Henry to be, rose upon his bed and shot him dead on the spot.” Some authorities say that John Richmond killed himself in remorse for this act, while others have it that he abandoned the family estates and fled to parts unknown. There were fragmentary rumors that he exiled himself and engaged in business pursuits under another name in the northern part of England. However that may have been, an interesting speculation, that seems to have much of soundness and reason in it, connects him with the American Richmond’s, as will now be seen.

I JOHN RICHMOND, the first American ancestor, was born about 1594 in Ashton-Keynes, Wiltshire, England. He was a man of affairs and ample means when he came to the new world in 1635, and he settled in Taunton, Mass., of which place he was one of the founders. He became a large land-owner and acquired considerable wealth. In the original purchase of Taunton, 1637, he owned six shares. He was absent from Taunton a great deal of the time, being recorded in Newport and elsewhere in Rhode Island. It is known he was in Rhode Island in 1655 and was a commissioner from Newport at the court of commissioners held at Portsmouth, R. L, in 1656.

In the manuscript of the Rev. Legh Richmond a tradition is recorded that the John Richmond of Ashton-Keynes, who shot his brother Henry Richmond, came to America in 1635 and engaged in business. Joshua Bailey Richmond, in his work, “The Richmond Family, 1598-1896, and Pre-American Ancestors, 1040-1594,” refers to this tradition and says in connection with it that nothing is definitely known concerning the American John Richmond between the years 1643 and 1655. He thinks that this John Richmond may have been the John Richmond who came to Saco, Me., in 1635, and that he may have returned to England and engaged in the Civil War. He was called Colonel, which circumstance might also tend to identify him with the John Richmond of the Civil War.

He died in Taunton, March 20, 1664.

He was married in England, although no record of his marriage has been found as yet.

Issue:

1. John Richmond, b. 1627; of whom below.

2. Edward Richmond of Newport, R. L, b. about 1632, d. November 1696. He was an incorporator of Little Compton, R. L, 1674; general solicitor, 1657-69-70-2; attorney-general, 1677-8-980; deputy to the general court, 1678-9, and a lieutenant and captain of the militia. M., 1st, Abigail Davis, daughter of James Davis; 2d, Amy Bull, daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Bull.

3. Sarah Richmond, b. about 1638, d. 1691. M., 1st, Edward Rew; 2d, James Walker; 3d, Nicholas Stoughton.

4. Mary Richmond, b. 1639, d. 1715. M. William Paul of Berkeley, R. I.

1. JOHN RICHMOND, son of the preceding, was born in Ashton-Keynes, Wiltshire, England, about 1627. He was brought to this country by his father in 1635 and became prominent in Taunton, Mass., where he maintained his residence during his entire life. He was a member of the town council, 1675-6 and 1690. He was also a constable, commissioner, and surveyor, and for more than half a century was a member of every important committee and commission appointed to deal with the business of the town and colony. He was especially interested in many purchases of land from the Indians in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. It is supposed (but not certainly known) that he had two wives, the first of whom does not appear of record. Died October 7, 1715, at Taunton. Married (2d) Abigail Rogers, daughter of John Rogers of Duxbury, Mass. She was born in 1641 and died August 1, 1727.

[It is claimed by some that John Rogers of Duxbury was a brother of Thomas Rogers, who came in the “Mayflower” in 1620. Another authority thinks he may have been a son of Joseph Rogers, who was the son of Thomas Rogers, the “Mayflower” emigrant. Later investigations show that John Rogers of Duxbury, the father of Abigail Rogers, was a grandson of Thomas Rogers the emigrant. The line of descent is as follows:

Thomas Rogers, who came over in the “Mayflower,” d. in 1621. He had these children: 1. Joseph. 2. John.

John Rogers, son of Thomas Rogers, b. in England; in Plymouth Colony in 1638, and later became a resident of Duxbury, Mass.; in 1657 was a representative to the general court of the colony from Duxbury; d. 1692. M., April 6, 1639, Anna Churchman.

John Rogers, son of the preceding, b. in 1640. He m. Elizabeth (Alden) Pabodie, daughter of William Pabodie and Elizabeth Alden, daughter of John and Priscilla (Mullens) Alden, who have been celebrated in Longfellow’s poem. William Pabodie or Peabody was a son of John Pabodie, who was b. in England 1590 and came to Plymouth Colony about 1635, being one of the original proprietors in England of the colony. John and Elizabeth Richmond had these children: 1. Abigail, b. 1642, m. John Richmond. 2. Anna or Hannah. 3. Elizabeth.]

Issue of John and Abigail (Rogers) Richmond:

1. Mary Richmond, b. June 2, 1654, in Bridgewater, Mass., d. March 5, 1732. M., January, 1679-80, Richard Godfrey of Taunton.

2. John Richmond, b. June 6, 1656, in Bridgewater, Mass., d. September 20, 1672.

3. Thomas Richmond, b. February 2, 1659, in Newport, R. I., d. September 14, 1705, in Middleboro, Mass.

4. Susanna Richmond, b. November 4, 1661, in Bridgewater, Mass., d. August 18, 1725. M., April 18, 1683, James Reed.

5. Joseph Richmond, b. December 8, 1666, in Taunton, Mass. M., June 26, 1685, Mary Andrews of Taunton.

6. Edward Richmond, b. February 8, 1665; of whom below.

7. Samuel Richmond, b. September 23, 1668, in Taunton, Mass., d. 1736. M. 1st, December 20, 1694, Mehitable Andrews; 2d. Elizabeth (King) Hall.

8. Sarah Richmond, b. February 7, 1670-1, in Taunton, Mass., d. November 27, 1727. M., October 6, 1699, James Walker.

9. John Richmond, b. December 5, 1673, at Taunton, Mass. M., November 28, 1709, Harriet Otis.

10. Ebenezer Richmond, b. May 12, 1676, at Newport, R. I., d. 1729. M. Anna Sproat.

11. Abigail Richmond, b. February 26, 1678, d. February 23, 1763. M., July 29, 1708, Nathan Walker.

Ill EDWARD RICHMOND, son of the preceding, was born in Taunton, Mass., February 8, 1665. He died in 1741.

Married, 1st, Mercy; 2d, Rebecca Thurston; 3d, Mary.

Issue (by first wife):

1. Mercy Richmond, b. 1693 in Taunton, Mass., d. January 27, 1760. M. Edward Walker.

2. Edward Richmond, b. 1695 in Taunton, d. February 16, 1771. M., 1st, Elizabeth R. Deane; 2d, Elizabeth (Shaw) Sampson.

3. Josiah Richmond, b. 1697; of whom below.

4. Nathaniel Richmond, b. about 1700 in Taunton; killed in the Louisburg expedition. M., November 2, 1732, Alice Hackett.

5. Seth Richmond, b. in Taunton. M. Lydia Haskins.

6. Phoebe Richmond, b. 1706 in Taunton, d. March 9, 1741-2. M. Noah Elliott.

IV JOSIAH RICHMOND, son of the preceding, was born in Taunton, Mass., in 1697. He died in 1763.

Married, 1st, Mehitable Deane, daughter of Benjamin and Sarah (Williams) Deane and granddaughter of Walter Deane, who emigrated from England. She was born June 6, 1697, and died February 5, 1745. Married, 2d, Lydia (Eddy) Crocker.

Issue (by Mehitable Deane):

1. Mary Richmond, b. in Middleboro, Mass., d. 1785. M., January 6, 1738, Captain Philip Leonard.

2. Josiah Richmond, b. 1711; of whom below.

3. Gershom Richmond, b. in Middleboro. M., July 30, 1747, Phoebe Richmond, who d. 1803.

4. Benjamin Richmond, b. 1727 in Middleboro, d. February 27,1803. M., 1st May 30,1751, Silence Deane; 2d, Lydia (Hall) Comstock.

5. George Richmond. M., October 5, 1751, Hannah Caswell.

6. Miriam Richmond, b. in 1732, d. 1813. M., 1st, Elisha Walker; 2d, Samuel Ray.

7. Lemuel Richmond, b. 1733 in Middleboro, d. April, 1802. M. Molly (Richmond) Lincoln.

8. Ephriam Richmond, b. February 12, 1735, in Middleboro, d. October 14, 1816. M., March 27, 1766, Ann Deane.

9. Eleazer Richmond, b. February 27, 1737 in Middleboro. d. February 27, 1802. M., December 5, 1765, Deborah Barrows.

10. Zeriah Richmond, b. in Middleboro, d. in Athens, Vt. M.,November 2, 1772, Jeremiah Tinkham, Jr., one of the first settlers of the village of Athens.

11. Mercy Richmond, b. in Middleboro d. about 1811. M., December 5, 1747, Benjamin Hackett.

12. Mehitable Richmond, d. young.

V JOSIAH RICHMOND, son of the preceding, was born in 1711 in Middleboro, Mass. He died in 1785.

Married, June 9, 1743, Elizabeth Smith of Middleboro, who died in 1803.

Issue:

1. Edward Richmond, d. May 26, 1748.

2. Phoebe Richmond, b. in Taunton, Mass. M., November 10, 1768, Job Townsend of Taunton.

3. Josiah Richmond, b. May, 1747; of whom below.

4. Mercy (or Mary) Richmond, b. in Taunton, d. July 21, 1784. M., June , 1774, Mathew Briggs of Dighton, Mass.

5. Walker Richmond, b. 1753 in Taunton, d. June, 1835. M., March, 1775, Mary Waldron of Dighton.

6. Edward Richmond, b. March 14, 1756, in Taunton, d. October 15, 1826. M., March, 1781, Olive Briggs, daughter of Eliakim Briggs of Dighton.

7. Nathaniel Richmond, b. April 13, 1766, in Taunton. M., 1st, about 1782, Mary Horswell of Fall River, Mass.; 2d, January 31, 1788, Abigail Wood of Middleboro; 3d, July, 1809, Azubah Cobb.

8. Abner Richmond, b. about 1769 in Taunton, d. April 18, 1813, in Barnard, Vt. M. Betsy Holmes daughter of Gershom Holmes of Plymouth, Mass.

9. Priscilla Richmond. M. Joseph Pierce.

10. Elizabeth Richmond, b. in Taunton, Mass. M., 1777, Asa Stephens of Dighton.

11. Hannah Richmond, b. in Taunton. M., 1st, 1781, Joseph Ware; 2d, 1790, Zephaniah Talbot.

VI JOSIAH RICHMOND, son of the preceding, was born in Dighton, Mass., in May, 1747. He received from his father’s estate a farm in Middleboro, Conn. This he sold in 1792, removing to Barnard, Vt. From there he went to Salina, now Syracuse, N. Y., in company with several of his brothers and other members of the family. During the Revolutionary War he was a soldier in the New York line. He saw much active service, and was taken prisoner, being carried to the island of Bermuda, where he was held captive until finally exchanged. It is told of him, in the annals of the family, that upon his discharge from the military service at the close of the war he was paid in continental money, and being very hungry that morning, gave forty-eight dollars of his hard-earned pay in the depreciated currency for his breakfast.

He died May 28, 1821.

Married Betsy Hathaway, daughter of Shadrach Hathaway of Elizabethtown, N. J. She was born about 1750 and died in 1835.

Issue:

1. Betsy Richmond, b. 1770 in Taunton. M. Job Richmond.

2. Hathaway Richmond, b. 1772 in Taunton; of whom below.

3. Edward Richmond, b. 1774 in Taunton, d. in Evansburg, 0. M., 1st, Martha Nott; 2d, Sally McFarlane; 3d, Miss Bedell; 4th, Miss Atchison; 5th, Miss Harger.

4. Sarah Richmond, b. 1776 in Taunton. M., 1799, Richard Cheedle.

5. Josiah Richmond, b. in Taunton; drowned at the age of twenty.

6. Abner Richmond.

7. Phoebe Richmond, b. in Taunton. M., 1st, James Nott; 2d, John Finley.

8. Anson Richmond, b. February 24, 1790, in Taunton, d. September 23, 1834, in Salina, N. Y. M., June 20, 1820, Betsy Melvin, daughter of Captain Moses Melvin.

9. John Richmond, b. July 25, 1792, in Taunton. M., 1st, Dinah Harwood; 2d, Abigail (Skillings) Averill.

10. Sybil Richmond, b. December, 1797, in Barnard, Vt., d. 1853, at Brady, Mich. M. Darius Crippen of Salina, N. Y.

VII HATHAWAY RICHMOND, son of the preceding, was born in 1772 in Taunton, Mass. He removed to Barnard, Vt., and from there joined the migration of the Richmond Family to Salina, N. Y., in 1816. He was interested with his brothers in the manufacture of salt and had an unusual talent for business, which evidently was transmitted by him to his distinguished son, Dean Richmond.

Died in 1821 in St. Louis, Mo.

Married, May 4, 1798, Rachael Dean, daughter of Elkanah Dean of Taunton, Mass. She died in Salina, N. Y., in 1821, the same year of her husband’s decease.

Issue:

1. Betsy Richmond, b. 1799 in Barnard, Vt.

2. Frindey Richmond, b. 1801 in Barnard, Vt., d. 1853 or 1854 in Attica, N. Y. M., 1st, at Salina, N. Y., Benjamin Babbitt of Barnard, Vt.; 2d, Augustus Chester of Chicago.

3. Dean Richmond, b. March 31, 1804; of whom below.

VIII DEAN RICHMOND, son of the preceding, was born in Barnard, Vt., March 31, 1804. He received his education in the public schools. His father died when he only fourteen years of age, and the entire care of his moth(r and family and the management of the business left by hi; father fell upon the shoulders of the boy. It was at this period, at an age when most boys were yet in school, that the young Dean showed the material of which he was made. He at once took full charge of the business of salt manufacturing at Salina, N. Y., that his father had developed. With little else save the debts of the old concern and a capital composed of health and energy, he began his active life. From the outset he displayed rare capacity for business and quickly won the confidence of his associates and of the public.

In less than a year the death of his mother left him altogether to his own resources. At that time the market for salt had, through various causes, become somewhat limited in that section, but the energy with which the young man pushed the sale soon extended to several new districts, particularly in the north and east, and ere long the business began to yield a satisfactory income.

Prospering in this enterprise, he embarked in others, in which also he commanded success. In 1842, at the age of eighteen, he removed to Buffalo where he engaged in the commission and transporting business, dealing principally with the products of the great west. Bringing to his business operations, which had then assumed great extent and importance, the wise foresight and judgment which characterized him throughout his entire life, he laid the foundations for the success that in the course of a few years made him one of the wealthiest and most influential men in the Lake region. Before he was twenty-one years of age his exceptional capacity for affairs was so marked that he was chosen a director of the bank at Salina, and when he was twenty-one he controlled, either by purchase or lease, all the salt works in Salina. From the time that he settled in Buffalo, his business was always located in that city and connected with the chain of lakes. In 1846 he became a resident of Attica, N. Y., but still maintained his business relations with Buffalo.

It was while located in Buffalo and in the midst of his active career in various lines of business that he made his first connection with railroad affairs. He became a large stockholder of the Utica and Buffalo Railroad Company, and was elected a director of that corporation. “When the direct line to Batavia was completed he took up his residence at that place, which continued to be his home for the remainder of his life, although the headquarters of his business was still retained at Buffalo. His acute business judgment and keen insight into the future gave him, far in advance of most of his contemporaries, a sound idea of what the infant railroad systems of the country would eventually become, and he early attached himself to this line of transportation development.

One of the most important events of his railroad career was his connection with the New York Central Railroad Company, a connection that was not less advantageous to the company than it was to him. When the Erie Railroad was finished to Lake Erie, and the Pennsylvania Central had completed its tracks, it was apparent that the several companies which afterward composed the New York Central could not successfully compete with those great lines unless they were consolidated and operated as one system and by one controlling mind. Seven distinct corporations were each managed independently of all the others, which the sub-roads were controlled each by a single board of directors. Consolidation became, therefore, a matter of imperative necessity, for the line could not be advantageously maintained otherwise. In 1853 the bill creating the New York Central Railroad was carried through the legislature against a most determined and virulent opposition. Nothing but the sagacity, address, and perseverance of Mr. Richmond could have prevailed against this opposition. In the “History of the New York Central Railroad” the following reference is made to his achievement in this connection:

“When the Erie and Pennsylvania railroads formed their coalition, Dean Richmond was one of those who most clearly perceived the necessity for consolidation of the railroads of central New York in order to meet the competition of this formidable combination. He thus became a leader in the movement to unite the seven railroad companies, which, as consolidated in 1853, constituted the New York Central Railroad Company. Himself already one of the most conspicuous and influential leaders of the Democratic party in the state of New York, it was principally the personal influence of Mr. Richmond which secured from the legislature the enactment of the incorporation of the New York Central. He was at once elected vice-president of the new corporation, holding this position from 1853 until 1864, when he succeeded Erastus Corning as president of the company. He remained in this office during the next two years, until his death. For many years he was also president of the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railroad.”

While connected with the New York Central, the company relied most implicitly on Mr. Richmond’s judgment, and never undertook any enterprise of importance without first submitting it to him for advice and approbation. His record as a railroad man is shown in the growth of that great property while under his control and the measures which he instituted or advanced for its improvement and enlargement. No matter what honor of labor or design may be given to others in the up-building of the great Central system, a large share properly belongs to Dean Richmond and is the monument of his railroad work. He labored at a time of uncertainty, discouragement, and difficulty, and his success was all the greater from the size and variety of the obstacles that he was compelled to confront. He was original, both in his ideas and methods. To him particularly belongs the credit of being the first American railroad man to adopt steel rails. Thoroughly convinced of their utility over the old iron rails, he met with much opposition when he proposed to introduce them, but was finally able to have a few laid on trial. He was so well pleased with the results that he placed in England what in those days was considered a large order. Unfortunately, however, he did not live to see his plans carried out, for the consignment did not arrive in this country until after his death.

Dean Richmond was not alone a railroad man. Actively connected throughout his exceptionally long career with many business enterprises, he was successful in everything that he undertook. A very considerable private business, to which he remained devoted throughout his life, was the shipping on the lakes, including the elevator system at Buffalo. At one time he owned large interests in the Western Transportation Company. In all business operations he had very decided views, and when once his mind was made up he adhered to his purpose with a persistence born of conviction and a firm belief in the surety of his judgment. Indeed, his judgment passed into a proverb among his associates, and was most implicitly relied upon, almost as if it had been infallible. His knowledge of business affairs was not merely intuition, although he possessed this faculty in a wonderful degree, but it was also derived from close observation and sound experience and through precision of reflection.

Mr. Richmond’s devotion to business did not lead him to ignore public affairs. He considered it a duty that every man owed to his country to interest himself in the national welfare, and held that it was especially important that business men should not lose sight of the gravity of national affairs as affecting their private interests. Although never forgetting that his private interests were of paramount importance and that his duty to his associates in business was the first demand upon his time and energy, he gave close attention to politics. His political convictions were strong and were steadfastly maintained, the marked characteristics of the man being displayed in this connection as conspicuously as they were in the business relations of his life. Possessed of great capacity for work, he gave careful attention to political affairs, no matter how absorbing were his business duties. In his earlier days he led the democrats of Onondaga County to victory, and in subsequent years entered into each new campaign in state and national politics with a zest and enthusiasm that inspired all who came in contact with him. Although a strong Union man during the Civil War, he always remained a democrat, and throughout his career held the fullest confidence of the state leaders of his party by virtue of his political acumen and sound judgment in matters of public and party policy. His successful organization of the democrats of Onondoga early brought him recognition, and his ability soon made him the leader of his party in the state. His motives were so sincere and honest they were never questioned, and his views, to a large extent, were unhesitatingly adopted by his associates and shaped their policy. For many consecutive years, from about 1857 until his death in 1866, he was chairman of the Democratic state central committee, and during that period exerted a greater influence in the Democratic party than any other man in the state. His success in dominating the Democratic party in New York State has become traditional, and his name is one of the most conspicuous in the annals of the party.

The prominent and unique relation to his party that Mr. Richmond held has been nowhere more clearly or forcibly shown than in the tribute offered to his memory by his intimate personal friend, the Hon. Samuel J. Tilden. In the Democratic state convention of September, 1866, Mr. Tilden, at the request of several prominent Democratic leaders, made an address upon the life work of Mr. Richmond. In the course of that address he said: “It is rare in any country or in any age that the death of a private citizen, holding no public office, never having held a public office in his whole life, connected with great business interests, it is true, connected more than any other individual with the organization and administration of a great party, composed of nearly four hundred thousand American citizens—it is rare that the death of an individual so unobtrusive in his life, so quiet in his demeanor, should have sunk the people of an entire state under a sense of a great calamity, almost as if the first magistrate of the nation had died. A private citizen, largely endowed by nature with those qualities superior to anything that can be taught in the schools of learning, those great endowments of judgment—clear, decisive, comprehensive, of a will firm, decisive, and nicely balanced, of a caution and circumspection rarely to be found; with a man of this character and these rare qualities, a man of the people, untaught in the schools, it is surprising that he should acquire that extraordinary degree of influence which was possessed by our lamented friend. I remember very well in 1864, when the nation was anxiously looking for a candidate for the highest office in its gift, public opinion turned very generally to this gentleman. He was modest— modest in his estimate of his own capabilities and powers beyond what any of us who had happened to have opportunities of larger training in the schools would have thought necessary, for the things he possessed least he valued highest, and, as men have thought, too high. I remember when it was said, with every appearance of possibility, that he could be nominated for that high office with the concurrence of a very large number of the Republican party, with a tender of support from gentlemen as eminent as any in the country, but whose names it would be indelicate now to mention. Mr. Richmond firmly and persistently refused to entertain the idea. It is my firm conviction that except for that refusal his nomination was entirely possible and his election extremely probable. I remember he said with characteristic modesty on that occasion, ‘I know what I am fit for and what I am not.’ He formed a judgment, founded on his idea of what a man should be to undertake the duties of a chief magistrate in respect to the habit, training, and manner of life and education. He firmly and persistently refused all these tenders because he did not deem himself adapted to that station. Yet with his rare powers of discernment and judgment, his great skill in the selection of agents, for whatever purpose he chose to apply his faculties to, there can be no doubt that he greatly overrated his own deficiencies and greatly overvalued those opportunities which he had not himself, in his early career, enjoyed. So happily endowed by nature, and perhaps largely taught by the experience of his long and varied life, I think he was one of the best-formed and ablest men whom I ever had the opportunity to know, although it has been my opportunity to see some of the ablest men this country and state have produced for the last generation.”

The Norman blood of the de Richmond’s, commingling with the strenuous blood of the Deans of Scotland in the veins of Mr. Richmond, was preeminently the source of his quenchless energy and mental vigor and masterly physique. These combined to make him one of the foremost men of his age in his chosen avocations and in the political world.

In private life he displayed marked qualities of character that distinguished him quite as well as in his business and political relations. His goodness of heart was well known to all who came intimately in connection with him, and was especially remembered by many who had particular occasion to have personal knowledge of his disposition in this way. He was benevolent in a quiet way, and frequently, without being appealed to, would relieve distress in the most substantial manner. His acts of philanthropy were numerous, disinterested, and generous, and his name became as well known in New York for kindness of heart as it was for business ability and political astuteness and sagacity. In his social relations he was a good friend, kindly and genial, while in the privacy of the family circle his noblest qualities shone with a brightness that only those who came in contact with him there could best appreciate.

He died in New York City, August 27, 1866. He had been living for the summer at the seashore with his family, and left there in company with his intimate friend, the Hon. Samuel J. Tilden, to attend the democratic convention at Saratoga. After the convention, in company with Mr. Tilden, he went to Philadelphia and Washington and returned to New York August 18. At Mr. Tilden’s city residence in Gramercy Park, on the following day, he was taken seriously ill and died in a little more than a week.

Married, February 19, 1833, in Troy, N. Y., Mary Elizabeth Mead. Mrs. Richmond was born in Troy, N. Y, June 21, 1813, and died in Batavia, N. Y., April 6,1895. Her father was Hathaway Mead and her mother was Electa Danchey or Danchier, of an old French family of distinction.

Mrs. Richmond was a woman of sterling qualities of character and developed very marked business ability. After the death of her husband, she managed skillfully and successfully the large properties that were left by him.

Issue:

1 Alfred William Richmond, b. October 1, 1836, in Syracuse, N. Y, d. November 17, 1881. M., 1st, in May, 1857, Mary L. Soper of Batavia, N. Y., who d. in September, 1874; 2d, in December 1875, Rosalind C. Morse. By his first wife Alfred William Richmond had, i. Catherine Richmond, b. November, 1858, d. September, 1859. ii. Dean William Richmond, b. February 19, 1860, m. Carrie Gale of Pontiac, Mich. By his second wife he had, iii. Rosalind A. Richmond, b. September, 1875; an accomplished pianist, violinist, and musical composer.

2. Harriet Richmond, b. October, 1838, d. August, 1839, at Saratoga Springs, N. Y.

3. Henry Augustus Richmond, b. August 3, 1840, in Syracuse, N. Y. He was at one time a civil service commissioner for the state of New York.

4. Adelaide R. Richmond, b. June 7, 1845, in Syracuse, N. Y. She resided in the old Richmond homestead at Batavia, N. Y., where she d. February 7, 1905. M., February 2, 1869, Dr. W. J. C. Kenny, who d. June 1, 1873. He was treasurer of the Buffalo Courier Company.

5. William Eugene Richmond, b. August 12, 1848, at Attica^ N. Y., a resident of Buffalo. M., February 2, 1872, Clara Nuns” of Buffalo. Issue: i. Watts Lansing Richmond b. April 29,1873.

11. William Eugene Richmond, Jr., b. April 29, 1875. iii. Adelaide K. Richmond, b. January 24, 1877. iv. Harold Richmond, b. September 19, 1878. v. Clara Richmond, b. April 24, 1880, d. May, 1883. vi. Francis Nims Richmond, b. September 9, 1887. vii. Dean Richmond, b. February 20, 1895.

6. Edward Gould Richmond, b. October 29, 1851, at Attica, N. Y.; graduated from the Racine College in 1874, and from the law department of Columbia College in 1878; became a banker and a widely known manufacturer and was president of the Chattanooga (Tenn.) Oil Company and of other large manufacturing interests. He was known throughout the south as one of the leading manufacturers and as a philanthropist, and was a gentleman of rare culture, nobility of character, and generosity of heart. D. November 29, 1903. M., June 19, 1889, Carrie Pfau of Cincinnati, O. Issue: i. Edward Dean Richmond, b. April 7, 1892. ii. Ruth Dean Richmond, b. February 12, 1896.

7. Edward Dean Richmond, b. October 29, 1851, in Attica, N. Y., d. September, 1852.

8. Dean Richmond, b. October 30, 1853, in Batavia, N. Y., d. February 2, 1885, in Batavia. Unmarried.

Fauntleroy of Virginia Family History

Fauntleroy Family

Fauntleroy Family

Fauntleroy coat-of-arms is described: From Virginia, Prominent Families, Vol. 1-4

On a wreath of the same colour, a fieur-de-lis ar, between two angels’ wings, displayed azure. Shields three infants’ heads coupled, argent, cringed or.
Motto: “Enfant du sor.”
The first known of the name of Fauntleroy was living in Dorset, England, in 1721. An undying tradition ascribes the paternity of the family to John, King of Frances, who was a captive at Windsor Castle, from 1356 to 1364, by a morganatic marriage with Catherine Grandeson, Countess of Salisbury, a member of the Courtenay family.
The first from whom an unbroken line was traced was John Fauntleroy, who married Joanna Whalley, of Purbick. Issue:
I. John Fauntleroy((2)). Married Elizabeth Wadham.
II. William Fauntleroy((2)), D. D., of Oxford.
III. Elizabeth Fauntleroy((2)), Abbess of Almsbury.
IV. Agnes Fauntleroy((2)). Married Lord Stourton.
V. Tristam Fauntleroy((2)). Married Joan, daughter of William, second Lord Stourton. His will was dated 1639. By the marriage of Tustam Fauntleroy and Joan Stourton, the family descends from the titled families of Stourton and Berkeley, as follows:
Robert Fitz Hardinge received Berkeley Castle by forfeiture, 1170, from Roger de Berkeley. Issue:
Maurice Hardinge, b. 1120, married Alice Berkeley, the daughter of the vested owner. He had Thomas of Berkeley, of Berkeley Castle, married Joan Saumasey, d. 1243. Issue.
Maurice Berkeley married Isabelle Crown, daughter of an English baron and his wife, Isabel de Valence (or Valem), half maternal sister to Henry the Third, by the second marriage of his mother, Isabelle, with William de Lusignan, ninth count de la Marche.
Miss Strickland traces her lineage through the Courtenay family to Louis le Gros. He had issue:
I. Thomas Berkeley, first Lord, who married, 1264, Joan Ferras, daughter of William de Ferras, Earl of Derby. Their daughter, Alice, married Ralph de Stourton, in 1300. Issue:
I. William de Stourton. Married Joan, daughter of Sir William Vernon.
II. John Stourton. Married a daughter of Lord Bassett.
III. William Stourton. Married Elizabeth Moigne, in 1402, daughter of Sir John Moigne. (Sir John was created baron, 1448; married Margarite, daughter of Sir John Wadham.)
IV. William Stourton. Married Margaret Chiddock, daughter of Sir John Chiddock.
V. Joan Stourton. Married Tristam Fauntleroy, in 1539. Issue:
I. John Fauntleroy, of Crondall, d. 1598. Married -.
II. William Fauntleroy, d. 1625. Married Frances -.
III. John Fauntleroy. Married Ph£be Wilkinson, in 1609.
Moore Fauntleroy Pedigree

Moore Fauntleroy Pedigree

IV. Moore Fauntleroy, came to Virginia in 1642, built Maylor’s Hold, Richmond Co., Va.; member of the House of Burgesses in 1644 to 1659; married Mary Hill. From this marriage, all of the name in Virginia descended. He sponsored a great number of early immigrants to America, his land holdings were very large. In the early days of the Colonies the British Crown awarded land grants for sponsoring immigrants.  They have intermarried with the Turners, of Kinlock, and Walsingham, the Beverleys, the Paynes of Warrenton, and some branches of the Carters (Carter Family, Chapter VII, Volume II). Landon Carter of Pittsylvania married Judith Fauntleroy.

Miss Betsey Fauntleroy, a granddaughter of Moore Fauntleroy, the emigrant, was one of the lady-loves of Gen’l George Washington. She did not smile on him, however, but married Dr. William Brockenbrough, of Tappahannock. She was grandmother of Judge William Brockenbrough, of the Court of Appeals, Richmond, Va. The house of President Jefferson Davis, during the Civil War, now the Confederate Museum, in Richmond, Va., was built and owned by him. (Volume I, Chapter VIII.)
Gen’l Thomas Turner Fauntleroy, another distinguished descendant of Moore Fauntleroy and Mary Hill; b. Richmond Co., Va., October 6, 1796; d. September 12, 1883. He was Colonel of the first Reg. U. S. Dragoons. As soon as Virginia seceded he promptly resigned, and offered himself to the Confederacy; he was made General. Of all the officers who resigned from the U. S. Army and came south, he held the highest rank. Married Ann Magdelin Magill, youngest child of Col. Charles Magill, and his second wife, Mary Buckner, née Thruston. Issue:
I. Charles Magill Fauntleroy, b. August 21, 1822; d. July 29, 1889.
II. Thomas Turner Fauntleroy.
III. Alfred Fauntleroy, d. in childhood.
IV. Mary Fauntleroy. Married Mr. Barnes.
V. Catherine Fauntleroy. Married Col. Whittlery.
VI. Archibald Magill Fauntleroy, b. July 8, 1836; d. 1886
I. Charles Magill Fauntleroy, b. 1822, entered U. S. Navy, but resigned in 1861, and entered the Confederate S. Army, and was appointed Inspector General, under Gen’l Joseph E. Johnston; married three times: first, Janet Knox of Leesburg, Loudoun Co., Va., in 1847; dying, she left one child:
I. Janet Fauntleroy. Married Powell Harrison, of Loudoun Co., Va.
Thomas Turner Fauntleroy, second son of Gen’l Fauntleroy and Mary Buckner Thruston, his wife, practiced law in Winchester, and was junior member of the law firm of Barton .& Williams. After the close of the Civil War, he was appointed Judge of the Va. Court of Appeals, which office he held for twelve years, during which time he lived in Richmond; later he removed with his family to St. Louis, where he now resides.
Judge Thomas T. Fauntleroy married, in Winchester, Va., in 1851, Ann Hite Williams, daughter of Philip Williams, a leading lawyer of the State, and Ann Maury, née Hite. One year later she died, leaving a babe of only a few weeks, called Philip Williams Fauntleroy, who was most affectionately raised by his stepmother, Williams. He first studied law, later for the Protestant Episcopal Ministry. He has had charge of a church in St. Louis for many years; married Miss Battle, and has several children.
Judge Thomas Turner Fauntleroy married, second, Elizabeth Smith Hite, daughter of Cornelius Baldwin Hite, Sr., of Belle Grove, and Augusta Elizabeth, née Smith, daughter of Col. Augustin Charles Smith, of Winchester, Va. Issue will be given elsewhere.
III. Mary Fauntleroy, eldest daughter of Gen’l Fauntleroy, and Ann Magdalen Magill, his wife; married Dr. Joseph Barnes, U. S. Army, Surgeon General, of Washington. Issue:
I. Joseph Barnes, Jr.
II. Anna Barnes.
IV. Katharine (called Kate) Fauntleroy, daughter of Gen’l Thomas T. Fauntleroy, married Major Whittlesey, U. S. A., for some years in charge of the “Soldier’s Home,” near Washington, D. C. Afterwards, was sent to a post in Washington Territory (now a State), where he died, leaving a widow and two sons. Mrs. Whittlesey has since died, her obituary appearing in a Winchester paper:
Winchester, Va., May 28, 1906.-A telegram was received here to-day from Seattle, Wash., announcing the death of Mrs. Katharine Whittlesey, widow of Major J. H. Whittlesey, of the United States Army, and member of an old and distinguished Virginia family, her father being General Thomas T. Fauntleroy, of this city. Two sons and one sister, Mrs. Barnes, of Washington, survive.
I. Charles Whittlesey. Married -, and lives in Tacoma, Washington.
II. William Whittlesey. Married -, and lives in Seattle, Washington.
V. Dr. Archibald Magill Fauntleroy, youngest son of Gen’l Thomas T. Fauntleroy, and Ann Magdalen, née Magill, resigned from the U. S. Army, and was appointed Medical Director and Surgeon on the staff of Gen’l Johnston; married Sally Conrad, the beautiful daughter of Robert L. Conrad, an eminent lawyer in Winchester, Va.; died leaving a widow and many children.
IV. Archibald Magill, son of Col. Charles Magill and Mary Buckner Thruston, his wife, married Mary Jane Page, of Bosewell, Gloucester Co., Va.; daughter of Mann Page, and Elizabeth Nelson, and granddaughter of Gov. Page and Gov. Nelson. Mr. and Mrs. Archibald Magill lived at “Barley Wood,” a few miles from Winchester, Va. No issue.
V. John Samuel Magill, son of Col. Charles Magill and Mary Buckner Thruston, married Mary Ann Glass. They lived at the “Meadows,” a handsome estate near Winchester. He was a lawyer, and represented Frederick Co., in the Legislature, several years. He had one child:
I. Mary Elizabeth Magill, d. in childhood.
VI. Alfred Thruston Magill, son of Col. Charles Magill and Mary Buckner Thruston, was Professor of Medicine in the University of Va.; at the time, his wife’s father, Judge Henry St. George Tucker, was Professor of Law there. Dr. Magill was not only distinguished in his profession, but honored and loved for his high character; d. June 12, 1837, aged 33 years. Married Ann Evelina Hunter Tucker, daughter of Judge Henry St. George Tucker, of the Court of Appeals of Va., brother of Judge Beverley Tucker, and half brother of John Randolph of Roanoke. Issue:
I. Fanny Bland Magill, b. December 17, 1828; d. May 13, 1901. Married Rev. James Robert Graham, October 3, 1853. He was in charge of the Presbyterian Church, in Winchester, which position he occupied until his death. He left one daughter, Evelina Tucker Magill, and five sons. Three of the latter are Presbyterian ministers, one a physician, and one a druggist, in St. Louis.
II. Mary Tucker Magill was a woman of culture, and wrote several books.
III. Evelina Magill. Married William Levin Powell, son of Mr. Humphrey Powell, of Loudoun Co., Va., and brother of Mrs. Randolph Tucker; she d. 1901, leaving one son:
I. Levin Powell, who graduated at the University of Va. in 1901.
IV. Virginia Magill. Married Maj. Edwards, C. S. Army. After the war, they settled in Atlanta, Ga. No issue.
VII. Henry Dangerfield Magill, son of Col. Charles Magill, and Mary Buckner Thruston, his wife, married Ann Elizabeth Mason, daughter of Temple Mason, of “Temple Hall,” Loudoun Co., Va. On May 15, 1847, Dr. Henry D. Magill was instantly killed by a fall from his horse, while on his round of professional duties. A friend wrote of him-“A noble and almost perfect specimen of a man, in mind, person and character, a successful and accomplished physician, descended on both sides from the best Revolutionary stock, but, above all, was his constant walk in the footsteps of Christ.” Bishop Meade, in his “Old Churches and Families,” speaks of the loveliness of Dr. Magill’s character. Issue:
I. Thomas Henry Magill. Married -, and lives in Louisiana.
II. Ann Magill. Married Mr. Sparrow, son of Dr. Sparrow, who for many years was Professor at the Episcopal Theological Seminary, near Alexandria, Va. She d. 1895, without issue. One of Mrs. Ann (Magill) Sparrow’s ancestors was Col. George Mason, member of Parliament, in the reign of Charles I, of England, and first of his family in America. (Mason Family, Volume II, Chapter XVII.)
VIII. Mary Buckner Thruston Magill, daughter of Charles Magill and Mary Buckner Thruston, his wife; b. 1810; d. 1890. She was a devoted church woman, lovely in character and possessed of voice of rare sweetness and power; married, 1831, Robert Lee Randolph, of “Eastern View,” son of Col. Robert Randolph and Elizabeth Carter, of Shirley. Issue elsewhere. (Randolph Family, Volume II, Chapter V.)
IX. Augustine Smith Magill, son of Col. Charles Magill and Mary Buckner Magill (Thruston), his wife; b. 1811. He was an A. M. of the University of Virginia; removed to St. Martinsville, La., and practiced law; married his cousin, Frances Weeks, of St. Martinsville, La. Issue:
I. David Weeks Magill.
II. Mary Ida Magill.
III. Augustine Magill.
IV. Buckner Magill, d. young.

Augustine Smith Magill d. 1852, and his widow married Dr. Pruett. In the summer of 1853, Dr. and Mrs. Pruett, with her two children, Ida and Augustine Magill, went to a much frequented bathing place on Lost Island, on the coast of Louisiana. During a terrific cyclone and tidal wave, the island was submerged, and Mrs. Pruett, the two children, and a brother of Dr. Pruett, were drowned. David Weeks Magill and Dr. John Augustine Smith expected to join the Pruett party, but were delayed by the storm. Their fate, some few weeks later, was equally tragic. Dr. Smith fell from a steamboat, which was approaching Morgan City, and was drowned; David Magill joined the C. S. Army, and died from fever contracted in the service.

Colonel George Reade Namesake of George Washington

Reade Pedigree

Reade COA

In 1691 the Town of York ( Yorktown ) was laid off by Laurence Smith, surveyor.  The king had issued orders for fifty acres of land to be purchased and laid off for a shire town (court-house town).  The land was to be paid for from the king’s treasury, tobacco.  The land was purchased from Benjamin Read, of Gloucester , and paid him 10,000 pounds of tobacco.
Robert Reade
Robert Reade , b. 1536, of Linkenholt Manor, Hants, England; m. ca. 1554, of Linkenholt Manor, Hants, England to Alice O’Pooley , b. 1536, of Linekenholt Manor, Hants, England.
Robert  & Alice (O’Pooley) Reade  had a son:
Andrew Reade
Andrew Reade , son of Robert  & Alice (O’Pooley) Reade , b. 1556, Linkenholt, Hampshire, England; d. Jul 1623, Faccombe, Hampshire, England; bur. 8 Jul 1623, Faccombe, Hampshire, England; m. 1550, of Kent, England to Alice Cooke  (? – Nfn), b. 1558, of Kent, England; chr. 12 Aug 1584, London , England ; d. 6 Mar 1605, Kent Manor , Linkenholt, Southamptonshire , England , bur. 6 Mar 1606.
Andrew  & Alice (Cooke) Reade  had eight (8) children:
1.       Henry Reade , b. 1566, Linkenholt, Hampshire , England ; d. 4 Apr 1647, Faccomb , England .
2.       Robert Reade , b. 1551, Linkenholt, Hampshire , England ; chr. Resident, Linkenholt Manor , England ; d. 10 Dec 1636, Faccombe, Hampshire , England .
3.       Henry Reade , b. 1574, Linkenholt, Harts, England ; d. 4 Apr 1647, Faccombe, Hampshire , England .
4.       John Reade , b. 1579, Faccombe, Southamptonshire , England .
5.       William Reade , b. ca. 1658, Of Linkholt, Hampshire , England .
6.       Andrew Reade , b. ca. 1566, Oflugershallhall, Hampshire , England .
7.       George Reade , b. 1570, Linkenholt, Harts, England .
8.       Thomas Reade , b. 1606, Linkholt, Hampshire , England ; d. 1669.
2.  Robert Reade, of Linkenholt Manor[i] , Hampshire, England; son of Andrew  & Alice (Cooke) Reade , b. 1551, Linkenholt Parish, Hampshire, England; d. 10 Dec 1636, Faccombe, Hampshire, England; m 1st Miss Unknown ; m 2nd 10 Apr 1588, Hampshire, England to Alice Pooley ; m 3rd 31 Jul 1600, St. Martin, Westminster, London, England to Mildred Windebank , daughter of Thomas  & Frances (Dymoke) Windebank , b. 21 Jul 1585, Hiene Hill, Berkshire, England; chr. 21 Jul 1585, Hiens Hill, Hurst , Bershire , England ; d. 1630, VA.
Robert  & Mildred (Windebank) Reade  had eleven (11) children:
2.1.        George Reade Esquire, b. 25 Oct 1608, Linkenholt Manor, Hampshire, England; d. October 01, 1674 in York County, VA; m. 1641, Yorktown, York Co., VA to Elizabeth Martiau . 2.2.        Andrew Reade , b. ca. 1608, Faccombe, Hampshire , England . 2.3.        Robert Reade , b. 25 Oct 1608, Faccombe, Hampshire , England ; d. by 1669.  Robert Reade was secretary to their uncle, Sir Franes Windebank , Colonial Secretary of State in London . 2.4.        William Reade , b. ca. 1610, Faccombe, Hampshire , England . 2.5.        Thomas Reade , b. 1606, Faccombe, Hampshire , England ; d. 1669, England . 2.6.        Benjamin Reade , b. ca. 1614, Linkenholt, Hampshire , England ; d. bef. 24 Jan 1693, York Co., VA. 2.7.        Child Reade , b. ca. 1616, Gloucester , VA   2.8.        Child Reade , b. ca. 1620, Gloucester , VA   2.9.        Child Reade , b. ca. 1622, Gloucester , VA   2.10.     Child Reade , b. ca. 1624, Gloucester , VA   2.11.     Child Reade , b. ca. 1626, Gloucester , VA.
Colonel George Reade , Esq.
2.1.  Colonel George Reade   Esq ., son of Robert  & Mildred (Windebank) Reade , b. 25 Oct 1608[ii] , Linkenholt Manor, Hampshire, England; chr. 1636, Yorktown, Virginia; d. 21 Nov 1671, Yorktown, York Co., VA[iii] or 1 Oct 1674, Yorktown, York Co., VA[iv] ; bur. Be. 20 Nov 1671[v] , Grace Episcopal Churchyard Yorktown, York Co., VA[vi] ; m. 1 Mar 1641, Yorktown, York County/Prince William Co[vii] , VA[viii] to Elizabeth Martiau , daughter of Nicholas  & Elizabeth (Berkeley) Martiau , .b. 1625, Elizabeth City, VA[ix] ; d. 10 Feb 1685, Yorktown, York Co., VA[x] ; will proved 24 Jan 1686/87[xi] , York Co., VA; bur. Grace Episcopal Churchyard[xii] .
George Reade  emigrated to Virginia in 1637, accompanying Governor Harvey  on the latter’s return to the colony.
Colonial Government Service
·         George Reade was attached to Harvey’s service in a secretarial capacity, and the letters to his brother show that he resided at the governor’s mansion for some time after his arrival in Virginia.
·         He arrived here on government business and in 1640-1641 he was made Secretary of the Colony.
·         In 1644 he was a Burgess for James City County.
·         From 1657 to 1660, he was a member of the Royal Council, enjoying the title of Colonel.
·         He attained the highest political office to which a Virginian of prominence could aspire — for the governorship was always filled by an appointee from England — Col. George Reade  was to hold the office of Councillor for eighteen years before his death in 1674.
George & Elizabeth (Martiau) Reade  attended the Grace Episcopal Church in Yorktown, York Co., VA.  During their latter years, the Reade’s resided at Yorktown, most likely on land inherited by Elizabeth from her father Nicholas.
Col. George  & Elizabeth (Martiau) Reade  had twelve (12) children:
2.1.1.        George Reade , b. 1640, Gloucester, VA; d. bef. 1686, VA.
2.1.2.        Mildred Reade , b. 2 Oct 1643, Warner Hall, Gloucester, VA; chr. Warner Hall, Gloucester, VA; d. 20 Oct 1686, Cumberland, VA or 1645, VA; d. 1694; bur. Oct 1686, Cumberland, VA; m. to “Speaker” Augustine Warner Jr .
2.1.3.        Francis Reade , b. 1650, Of Abingdon, Gloucester, VA.; d. 1694, James City, VA. 2.1.4.        Benjamin Reade , b. 1647, Gloucester, VA; d. 1731, Gloucester, VA.
2.1.5.        Margaret Reade , b. ca. 1654, York, VA; d. VA.
2.1.6.        Thomas Reade , b. 1649, Ware Parish, Gloucester, VA; d. 1720, Gloucester, VA. 2.1.7.        Andrew Reid , b. Nov 1636, England; d. 1697, Cople Parish, Westmoreland, VA 2.1.8.        Mary Reade , b. ca. 1658, VA
2.1.9.        Ann Reade , b. 1652, York, VA; d. VA. 2.1.10.     Elizabeth Reade , b. 1651, York, VA; d. 18 Nov. 1717, York, VA; m. to Thomas Chrisman .
2.1.11.     Thomas Reade , b. ca. 1671, Gloucester or York, VA.
2.1.12.     Robert Reade , b. 1644, Yorktown, York Co., VA; d. 30 Dec 1712, VA; bur. Bef. 16 Mar 1712
2.1.2.  Mildred Reade , daughter of Col. George  & Elizabeth (Martiau) Reade  founder of Yorktown},  b. 2 Oct 1643, Warner Hall, Gloucester, VA; chr. Warner Hall, Gloucester, VA; d. 20 Oct 1686, Cumberland, VA or 1645, VA; d. 1694; bur. Oct 1686, Cumberland, VA; m 1st “Speaker” Colonel Augustine Warner Jr ., of Warner Hall, son of Augustine  & Mary (Townley) Warner , b. 3 Jun 1642, Gloucester, VA; d. 19 Jun 1681. He m 2nd to Elizabeth Martian.
In 1658, Augustine Warner Jr was sent to England by his father to be educated at Marchant Taylor’s school in London.
Colonial Government Service
·         Augustine Warner II , served as a Burgess for York Co., VA in Apr 1652
·         Burgess for Gloucester Co., VA Mar 1658-59.
·         He served as Burgess for the Council of State Marc 1659-60.
·         In Mar 1675-6 and Feb 1676-7, he was the Speaker of the House of Burgesses during Bacon’s Rebellion.   During Bacon’s Bacon, used Rebellion Warner Hall as his headquarters, after the burning of Jamestown. He was a member to the Council of Virginia, 1677.

Col. Augustine & Mildred (Reade) Warner  had four (4) children:
2.1.2.1.     Mildred Warner , d. 1701. m. Lawrence Washington , b. 1659.
2.1.2.2.     Mary Warner , m.  17 Feb 1680 to Col. John Smith II  or “Purton”.
2.1.2.3.     Elizabeth Warner , b. 24 Nov 1672 at “Chesake”, m. “Councilor” John Lewis   2.1.2.4.     Robert Warner  never married.

In 1691 the Town of York ( Yorktown ) was laid off by Laurence Smith, surveyor.  The king had issued orders for fifty acres of land to be purchased and laid off for a shire town (court-house town).  The land was to be paid for from the king’s treasury, tobacco.  The land was purchased from Benjamin Read, of Gloucester , and paid him 10,000 pounds of tobacco.

[i] The Virginia Cowne Family:  From its Origin in the Isle of Man to England and America” by Jonathan Augustine Cowne  and Janna Lee  Gough  Cowne, June 1981, pp. 1-51   [ii] “Cemeteries of City of Poquoson, Virginia and Some Cemeteries of York County, Virginia”, p. 96, by Jessie Fay Forrest, edited by James H. Mero (published by Hugh S. Watson, Jr. Genealogical Society, Hampton, Virginia). [iii] AFN: 3GLM-J9 [iv] “Cemeteries of City of Poquoson, Virginia and Some Cemeteries of York County, Virginia”, p. 96, by Jessie Fay Forrest, edited by James H. Mero (published by Hugh S. Watson, Jr. Genealogical Society, Hampton, Virginia). [v] AFN: 3GLM-J9 [vi] “Cemeteries of City of Poquoson, Virginia and Some Cemeteries of York County, Virginia”, p. 96, by Jessie Fay Forrest, edited by James H. Mero (published by Hugh S. Watson, Jr. Genealogical Society, Hampton, Virginia). [vii] AFN: 3GLM-J9 [viii] “Marriage of York County, Virginia”, p. 50, compiled by Vincent Watkins (1986) Poquoson, Virginia.  I have found a second date of marriage as 1641, Yorktown, VA. [ix] “Cemeteries of City of Poquoson, Virginia and Some Cemeteries of York County, Virginia”, p. 96, by Jessie Fay Forrest, edited by James H. Mero (published by Hugh S. Watson, Jr. Genealogical Society, Hampton, Virginia). [x] AFN: 3GLM-KG [xi] “Cemeteries of City of Poquoson, Virginia and Some Cemeteries of York County, Virginia”, p. 96, by Jessie Fay Forrest, edited by James H. Mero (published by Hugh S. Watson, Jr. Genealogical Society, Hampton, Virginia). [xii] “Cemeteries of City of Poquoson, Virginia and Some Cemeteries of York County, Virginia”, p. 96, by Jessie Fay Forrest, edited by James H. Mero (published by Hugh S. Watson, Jr. Genealogical Society, Hampton, Virginia).

George Reade bio and Descendents

George Reade, a native of London, came to Virginia 1637 in Sir John Harvey’s party.  Harvey was returning to Virginia to assume the office of Governor of the Colony.  Reade was appointed Secretary of State, pro tem of the colony in 1640 and served as Acting Governor in the absence of Governor Harvey.  He was a member of the House of Burgesses and a member of the Colonial Council until his death.  His will, no longer extant, is documented in a York County 18th century land transaction.

York Co, VA Deeds & Bonds Book 5 pp 3 – 6 This Indenture made the sixteenth day of May in the fortieth year of the Reign of our Sovernge Lord George the Second King of Great Britain and in the year of our Lord Christ one thousand seven hundred & forty one between James Mitchell of the Town & County of York and Janet his wife of the one part and Richard Ambler of the same Town & county aforesaid . Whereas George Reade late of the sd county of York Esq decd being siezed in fee of a certain tract or parcel of land lying & being in the said County of York containing by Estimation Eight hundred & fifty acres did by his last Will and Testament in writing bearing date the twenty ninth day of September in the Year of our Lord One thousand six hundred & Seventy devise the same by the name of all that Tract of Land wherein he lived to his wife during life and after her decease to be equally divided between his sons, George & Robert and the heirs of their bodies but and fault of such heirs in either or both of them or in case either or both of them should dye during their minority then he gave and devises his and their parts of the land aforesaid to his sons Francis and Benjamin and the heirs of their bodies with other remainders over as by the said Will duly proved in the General Court of this Colony being thereunto had may more at large appear and whereas the said George Reade one of the sons of the Testator dyed many years ago without issue and after his death the said Francis & Benjamin Reade intend into one ninety or half part of this premises to as afore devised and afterwards the said Robert Reade, Francis Reade & Benjamin Reade by Deed bearing date the twelfth day of November in the Year of our Lord one thousand and six hundred & eighty eight made partition of the premises aforesaid ………

George Reade married Elizabeth Martiau, daughter of Nicolas Martiau (Father of Yorktown).  Their daughter Mildred, wife of Col. Augustine Warner, was the g-grandmother of George Washington.

George Read, the son of Robert Read of London and his wife Mildred Windebank, was one of the about one hundred colonists, who emigrated to the colonies from England and Wales before the end of the 17th century, known to have legitimate descent from a Plantagenet King of England.

The illustrious ancestry of George Reade is documented nicely in Colonial Records during the period of 18 January 1638/9 – 11 December 1641.  The file includes letters from the Colonial Governor, Secretary of State and George Reade to Sir Francis Windebank and/or Windebank’s personal secretary Robert Reade (George Reade’s brother.)  The correspondence file is quite interesting, alluding to the politics behind George Reade’s appointment as Secretary of State during Richard Kemp’s sojourn in England.  It also includes personal requests from George Reade to his brother for servants and money.  Earlier correspondence puts a personal face on George Reade’s life.  “Sir John Harvey to Robert Reade, 17 Nov. 1637.  Hopes to employ Reade’s brother against the Indians.  He is well and stays at the writer’s house.”  “George Reade to Robert Reade, his brother, 26 Febr. 1637/8.  Does not think much of Mr. Hawley.  Thanks to the support of the Governor and Mr. Kemp, the writer has survived.  Mr. Menephe has brought many servants.  Mr. Hawley has promised the writer that the next lot of servants coming to Virginia would be for him but he does not believe it as Hawley is in Maryland.”

“Adventurers of Purse and Person 1607 – 1624/5 and Their Families” published by the Order of First Families of Virginia, indicates in a footnote (pp. 419-420) the discrepancy between the dates inscribed on his Grace Church tablets and the filing of the wills for George Read and his wife Elizabeth as follows:  “His and his wife’s gravestones were discovered during street excavations in Yorktown in 1931.  The inscriptions on both were recut with errors.  George Reade’s stone now states he died Oct. 1674, “he being in the 66th yr of his age.”  Since the date should be 1671 (per his will), either the age shown, or his year of birth, is in error as well….The gravestone of Elizabeth (Martiau) Read now states she was born in 1625 and died in 1696, “being in ye 71st yeare of her age.”  Since the year of death should be 1686 (per her will), again the age or year of birth is in error.  Since Nicholas Martiau claimed…his daughter Elizabeth as headrights…it would appear Elizabeth was born prior to his arrival in Virginia in 1620…and that Elizabeth’s birth occurred in 1615 rather than 1625.”

The graves of George Reade and his wife Elizabeth were discovered while excavating on Buckner Street in Yorktown.  In 1931, descendant Letitia Pate Evans had the tablets restored and moved to the church yard of Grace Episcopal Church.   The Reade tablets sit adjacent to the plots of Gov. Thomas Nelson (Declaration of Independence signer), his father, and grandfather (who married a George Reade descendant.)

Descendants of Col. George Reade

Generation No. 1

1. Col. George1 Reade, Col. (RobertA, AndrewB) was born Bet. 1605 – 1608 in Linkenholt, Hampshire, England1,2, and died Bef. 21 Nov 1671 in York Co, VA3,4. He married Elizabeth Martiau Abt. 16415, daughter of Nicolas Martiau.  She  died Bef. 24 Jan 1686/87 in York Co, VA7,8.

Children of George Reade and Elizabeth Martiau are:

+ 2 i. Elizabeth2 Reade, died 18 Nov 1717 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA.

+ 3 ii. Mildred Reade, died 1694.

4 iii. George Reade.

+ 5 iv. Robert Reade, died Bef. 16 Mar 1722/23 in York Co, VA.

+ 6 v. Thomas Reade.

+ 7 vi. Francis Reade, died Abt. 1694.

8 vii. Benjamin Reade. He married Mary (Gwynn?).

 

Generation No. 2

2. Elizabeth2 Reade (George1, RobertA, AndrewB) died 18 Nov 1717 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA9,10. She married Captain Thomas Chisman, son of Edmund Chisman and Mary. He was born Abt. 1651 in Virginia11, and died Bef. 18 Jul 1715 in York Co, VA11.

Children of Elizabeth Reade and Thomas Chisman are:

9 i. Thomas3 Chisman, Capt., died 11 Dec 1722 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA12,13,14. He married Anne15.

10 ii. Mary Chisman, died 22 Jan 1719/20 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA16. She married Edward Athey.

11 iii. Mildred Chisman, born 19 Feb 1675/76 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA17,18,19. She married Lawrence Smith, Col; died 27 Feb 1738/39 in York Co, VA20,21.

12 iv. Elizabeth Chisman, born 08 Nov 1681 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA22,23. She married Unknown Lucas24.

13 v. Col. John Chisman, born 04 Mar 1682/83 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA25,26; died 19 Sep 1728 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA26,27. He married Ellinor Hayward28 22 Dec 1708 in York Co, VA29,30; born 25 Jul 1690 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA31,32; died 08 Feb 1767 in York Co, VA33.

14 vi. Jane Chisman, born 21 Mar 1686/87 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA34,35,36.

15 vii. George Chisman, born 05 Jan 1688/89 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA37,38,39; died 06 Oct 1710 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA39,40.

16 viii. Sarah Chisman, born 02 May 1690 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA41,42,43.

17 ix. Anne Chisman, born 20 Dec 1692 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA44,45,46.

 

3. Mildred2 Reade (George1, RobertA, AndrewB) died 1694. She married Col. Augustine Warner, son of Augustine Warner and Mary Towneley. He was born 03 Jun 164247, and died 19 Jun 168147.

Children of Mildred Reade and Augustine Warner are:

18 i. George3 Warner.

19 ii. Robert Warner.

20 iii. Mildred Warner, died 1701 in Whitehaven, England48,49. She married (1) Laurence Washington. She married (2) George Gayle.

21 iv. Elizabeth Warner. She married John Lewis.

22 v. Mary Warner.

23 vi. Isabella Warner, born 24 Nov 1672 in Chesake, Virginia50; died 06 Feb 1719/2050. She married John Lewis, Major; born 30 Nov 166950; died 14 Nov 172550.

 

5. Robert2 Reade (George1, RobertA, AndrewB) died Bef. 16 Mar 1722/23 in York Co, VA51,52. He married Mary Lilly53, daughter of John Lilly. She died Bef. 20 Nov 172254.

Children of Robert Reade and Mary Lilly are:

24 i. John3 Reade.

25 ii. Margaret Reade. She married Thomas Nelson; born 20 Feb 1677/7855; died 07 Oct 174555.

26 iii. Robert Reade.

27 iv. Thomas Reade, died 171956.

28 v. George Reade.

29 vi. Samuel Reade, died 20 Nov 175857. He married Mary Schlater.

30 vii. Mildred Reade. She married (1) James Goodwin Bef. 1719; died 16 Nov 1719 in York Co, VA57,58. She married (2) Lawrence Smith, Col Bef. 172059; died 27 Feb 1738/39 in York Co, VA60,61.

31 viii. Francis Reade.

 

6. Thomas2 Reade (George1, RobertA, AndrewB) He married Lucy Gwynn, daughter of Edmund Gwynn and Lucy Bernard.

Children of Thomas Reade and Lucy Gwynn are:

32 i. Thomas3 Reade, died 17 Apr 173962. He married Ann Booth; born 170662; died 09 Jan 177562.

33 ii. John Reade, Rev., born 169962; died Bef. 13 Mar 1743/4463,64. He married Frances Yates 02 Feb 1737/3865.

34 iii. Lucy Reade, died 22 Nov 173165. She married John Dixon.

35 iv. Mary Reade. She married Mordecai Throckmorton, Capt.; died Bef. 09 Nov 176765.

36 v. Mildred Reade. She married Philip Rootes, Maj..

37 vi. Joyce Reade, born 08 Mar 1701/0265; died 08 Aug 1771 in Caroline Co, VA65. She married Christopher Tompkins; born 17 Oct 1705 in Gloucester Co, VA65; died 16 Mar 1779 in Caroline Co, VA65.

 

7. Francis2 Reade (George1, RobertA, AndrewB) died Abt. 169466. He married (1) Jane Chisman, daughter of Edmund Chisman and Mary. He married (2) Anne Bef. 169366.

Children of Francis Reade and Jane Chisman are:

38 i. Mary3 Reade. She married Edward Davis67.

39 ii. Elizabeth Reade. She married Paul Watlington Bef. 170768.

Children of Francis Reade and Anne are:

40 i. George3 Reade.

41 ii. Anne Reade.

42 iii. Benjamin Reade. He married Lucy Bef. 169268.

Endnotes

1. Tombstone.
2. Edited by Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person 1607-1624/5 and Their Families, (Published by Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 419.
3. Tombstone Picture.
4. Edited by Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person 1607-1624/5 and Their Families, (Published by Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 420.
5. Edited by Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person 1607-1624/5 and Their Families, (Published by Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 419.
6. Adventures of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1625, FFV., 420.
7. Tombstone Picture.
8. Edited by Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person 1607-1624/5 and Their Families, (Published by Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 420.
9. Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person Virginia 1607-1624/5, (Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 172.
10. Landon C. Bell, Charles Parish York County, Virginia History and Registers, (Library of Virginia, Richmond, VA, 1932, 1984, 1996), 208.
11. Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person Virginia 1607-1624/5, (Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 172.
12. William & Mary College Quarterly Historical Papers Vol. 1 No. 2, October 1892 p. 97
13. Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person Virginia 1607-1624/5, (Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 173.
14. Landon C. Bell, Charles Parish York County, Virginia History and Registers, (Library of Virginia, Richmond, VA, 1932, 1984, 1996), 208.
15. William & Mary College Quarterly Historical Papers Vol. 1 No. 2, October 1892 p. 97
16. Landon C. Bell, Charles Parish York County, Virginia History and Registers, (Library of Virginia, Richmond, VA, 1932, 1984, 1996), 208.
17. William & Mary College Quarterly Historical Papers Vol. 1 No. 2, October 1892 p. 97
18. Landon C. Bell, Charles Parish York County, Virginia History and Registers, (Library of Virginia, Richmond, VA, 1932, 1984, 1996), 64.
19. Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person Virginia 1607-1624/5, (Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 173.
20. Colonial Americans of Royal & Noble Descent p. 108
21. Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person Virginia 1607-1624/5, (Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 173.
22. William & Mary College Quarterly Historical Papers Vol. 1 No. 2, October 1892 p. 97
23. Landon C. Bell, Charles Parish York County, Virginia History and Registers, (Library of Virginia, Richmond, VA, 1932, 1984, 1996), 63.
24. William & Mary College Quarterly Historical Papers Vol. 1 No. 2, October 1892 p. 97
25. Landon C. Bell, Charles Parish York County, Virginia History and Registers, (Library of Virginia, Richmond, VA, 1932, 1984, 1996), 63.
26. Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person Virginia 1607-1624/5, (Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 173.
27. Landon C. Bell, Charles Parish York County, Virginia History and Registers, (Library of Virginia, Richmond, VA, 1932, 1984, 1996), 208.
28. Landon C. Bell, Charles Parish York County, Virginia History and Registers, (Library of Virginia, Richmond, VA, 1932, 1984, 1996), 102.
29. William & Mary College Quarterly Historical Papers Vol. 1 No. 2, October 1892 p. 98
30. Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person Virginia 1607-1624/5, (Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 173.
31. Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person Virginia 1607-1624/5, (Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 173-174.
32. Landon C. Bell, Charles Parish York County, Virginia History and Registers, (Library of Virginia, Richmond, VA, 1932, 1984, 1996), 102.
33. Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person Virginia 1607-1624/5, (Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 174.
34. William & Mary College Quarterly Historical Papers Vol. 1 No. 2, October 1892 p. 97
35. Landon C. Bell, Charles Parish York County, Virginia History and Registers, (Library of Virginia, Richmond, VA, 1932, 1984, 1996), 63.
36. Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person Virginia 1607-1624/5, (Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 173.
37. William & Mary College Quarterly Historical Papers Vol. 1 No. 2, October 1892 p. 97
38. Landon C. Bell, Charles Parish York County, Virginia History and Registers, (Library of Virginia, Richmond, VA, 1932, 1984, 1996), 63.
39. Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person Virginia 1607-1624/5, (Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 172.
40. Landon C. Bell, Charles Parish York County, Virginia History and Registers, (Library of Virginia, Richmond, VA, 1932, 1984, 1996), 208.
41. William & Mary College Quarterly Historical Papers Vol. 1 No. 2, October 1892 p. 97
42. Landon C. Bell, Charles Parish York County, Virginia History and Registers, (Library of Virginia, Richmond, VA, 1932, 1984, 1996), 64.
43. Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person Virginia 1607-1624/5, (Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 172.
44. William & Mary College Quarterly Historical Papers Vol. 1 No. 2, October 1892 p. 97
45. Landon C. Bell, Charles Parish York County, Virginia History and Registers, (Library of Virginia, Richmond, VA, 1932, 1984, 1996), 62.
46. Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person Virginia 1607-1624/5, (Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 172.
47. Tombstone.
48. Some Prominent Virginia Families by Louise Pecquet du Bellet p.9
49. Plaque – Warner Hall Graveyard.
50. Tombstone.
51. Edited by Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person 1607-1624/5 and Their Families, (Published by Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 422.
52. York Co, VA Orders, Wills Book #14 pp 241-242.
53. William & Mary College Quarterly Historical Papers Vol. 1 No. 2, October 1892 p. 90
54. Edited by Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person 1607-1624/5 and Their Families, (Published by Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 422.
55. Edited by Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person 1607-1624/5 and Their Families, (Published by Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 423.
56. Some Prominent Virginia Families by Louise Pecquet du Bellet p.9
57. Edited by Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person 1607-1624/5 and Their Families, (Published by Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 423.
58. York Co, VA Deeds, Orders, Wills Book 15 p. 517.
59. Edited by Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person 1607-1624/5 and Their Families, (Published by Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 423.
60. Colonial Americans of Royal & Noble Descent p. 108
61. Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person Virginia 1607-1624/5, (Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 173.
62. Edited by Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person 1607-1624/5 and Their Families, (Published by Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 423.
63. William & Mary Quarterly Vol 3 p. 40.
64. Edited by Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person 1607-1624/5 and Their Families, (Published by Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 423.
65. Edited by Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person 1607-1624/5 and Their Families, (Published by Order of First Families of Virginia, 1987), 424.
66. William & Mary College Quarterly, Vol 3, 40.
67. William & Mary College Quarterly Historical Papers Vol. 3 1894-95, p 40.
68. William & Mary College Quarterly, Vol 3, 40.

Waters Family Genealogical History Part 1

Origin of the Waters Family. — First Settlement of Virginia. — Historical.

“Footprints on the sands of time.” ~ Longfellow

The Waters name is one more common and the family much more numerous in America than any one who had not given the subject thought or study would imagine.Persons bearing this name are to be found living in every State and territory of the American Union. Waters emigrants from Great Britain settled at an early date in the English colonies of both Jamestown and Plymouth. In every instance the families of these Waters claim descent from ancestor emigrants from some part of the British possessions. They are found to have lived for some centuries,before the settlement of this country by Europeans, in England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales.

Family names came with the Norman conquest of England in A. D. 1066. Previously Englishmen had no surnames, and when for convenience another was needed, they were called by their occupations, estates, places of birth or from some personal peculiarity.

The origin of the Waters name has not been ascertained, and no fanciful theories or conjectures have been indulged in attempts to account for it. The family is not of the nobility, and had so little connection with affairs of the government that no mention of any of the name is to be found in any general history of the mother country. The name was not always spelled as at present, but varied as prompted by the idiosyncrasy or learning of the individual, like the quaint mode of spelling English words at an early period; and in England the name was spelled Wartyr, Warter, Watter and Waters, in public documents and records.

In “Gleanings from English Records,^’ by Henry P. Waters, published by the Essex Institute, from a note to an abstract of the will of Robert Watter, we condense the following reference to him:

Robert Watter of Crundal, an eminent merchant of York, was twice lord mayor thereof, viz., 1591, 1603. He entertained King James VI. of Scotland when he was on his way to London in 1603 to be crowned King of England. He was knighted by the king. He was said to be descended from Richard Wartyr, merchant in York, sheriff in 1431, lord mayor in 1436 and 1451, and member of Parliament in 1434. Richard Wartyr had a brother William Wartyr, who was prior of Water, County York, in 1424, and a brother Francis or Nicholas Warter, a vicar of St. Mary^s, York, in 1429. Abstracts of wills of others of the family follow, in which are recited bequests of real and personal estate, indicating that the testators were of the class of landed gentry. Knights were armed horse-soldiers or cavaliers, who had received their weapons and titles in a solemn manner. Only the wealthy and noble could, as a rule, afford the expense of a horse and armor, and chivalry or knighthood came in time to be closely connected with the idea of aristocracy. It was the custom for each knight to wear on his helmet a device called a “crest” also to have one called a coat of arms. This served to distinguish him. from others, and was of practical use not only to the followers of a great lord, who thus knew him at a glance, but it served in time of battle to prevent the confusion of friend and foe. Eventually these coats of arms became hereditary, and the descent and to some extent the history of a family can be traced by them. (Montgomery’s History of England.)

Waters of Virginia Coat of  Arms

Waters of Virginia Coat of Arms

In “Fairbairn’s Crests” and ”Burke’s Armory” may be found the coat of arms and crest of the Waters, an engraving of which is shown as a frontispiece of this volume. The description is as follows:

Arms: Sa. on a fess wavy argent between three swans of the second two bars wavy azure.
Crest: A demi-talbot argent, holding in the mouth an arrow gu.
Motto: “Toujours Fidele”, (Always Faithful).

In the same works are described three others, viz.Waters of Saman, Carmarthen, a demi-griffin, arg. Honor fietas.

Waters — Ireland, an eagle rising regardent — ppr — spiro spero.

Waters, of New Castle, County Limerick, Ireland, a demi-heraldic tiger per pale indented argent, and azure, holding a branch of three red roses slipped, ppr.

The one first above described and shown in frontispiece is that of the American Waters of New England and of Virginia and Maryland.

It is not proposed to write a history of the European family, nor to include within the scope of this work the genealogies of the New England and Maryland branches. The history of the New England and Maryland Waters has been written, and for the first time that of the Virginia-Carolina family is here attempted.

FIRST SETTLEMENT OF VIRGINIA,

Virginia was the first permanent English settlement in America, and as that settlement was the cradle of nativity in America of the Southern branches of the Waters family, some brief account of the early history of that settlement, its people and their characteristics, is not out of place here, but necessary to understand many events with which the lives of the ancestors of this Virginia family were intimately connected.

On the 10th of April, 1606, a charter was issued under the royal seal of King James I. of England to a company formed by Gates, Somers and others, granting to them those territories in America lying on the seacoast between the thirty-fourth and the forty-fifth degrees north latitude. The petitioners by their own desire were divided into companies : one consisting of certain knights, gentlemen, merchants and other adventurers of the city of London, elsewhere called the London Company or First Colony, and was required to settle between the thirty-fourth and forty-first degrees of north latitude; the other, composed of similar classes of Bristol, Exeter and other places in the west of England, was called the Second Colony and ordered to settle between the thirty-eighth and forty-fifth degrees of north latitude. The intermediate region was open to both companies. At that time the whole country between the French settlements on the north and the Spanish settlements in the south was named Virginia, after Queen Elizabeth, the Virgin Queen of England. The patent also empowered the companies to transport to the colonies as many English subjects as should be willing to accompany them, who with their descendants were to retain the same liberties as if they had remained in England.

Having procured their charter, the patentees proceeded to fit out a squadron of three small vessels, the largest not exceeding one hundred tons burden, bearing one hundred men destined to remain.

This squadron was placed under the command of Captain Newport, and sailed from England on the 19th of December, 1606. Captain Newport pursued the old track by the way of the Canaries and the West Indies, and as he turned north he was carried by storm beyond Roanoke, whither he had been ordered, into Chesapeake Bay. Having discovered and named Cape Henry and Cape Charles, in honor of the king’s sons, he sailed up the noble bay. All the company were filled with admiration of its extent, the fertility of its shores, and the magnificent features of the surrounding scenery.

They soon entered the Powhatan River, which in honor of the king was called James River. About fifty miles above the mouth of this river a location for the colony was selected, which they called Jamestown, in honor of their king. A landing was effected on the 13th of May, 1607, a few huts were erected and a small fort built as a defense against the natives. After a month, Newport set sail for England, and then the difficulties of the colonist began to be apparent. Their provisions were spoiled, and the climate was found uncongenial to European constitutions. During the summer nearly every man was sick, and before autumn over half of their number died, and the colony would have been deserted had not Captain Smith, at the peril of his life, prevented. In this critical condition of affairs Newport returned from England with a reinforcement of one hundred men, a supply of provisions and implements of husbandry.

Thus far the hopes of the company in England had been disappointed, and in order to increase their funds, numbers and privileges, they petitioned for a new charter, which was granted on the 23d of May, 1609. The territory of the colony was extended from Point Comfort two hundred miles north and south along the coast and across the continent from sea to sea, including all islands within one hundred miles of the coast of both seas. The company was enlarged at the time the charter was granted by the addition of some of the first nobility and gentry, most of the companies in London, and a great number of merchants and tradesmen. A fleet of nine vessels and five hundred emigrants were sent out in June, 1609, under the new charter, commanded by Captain Newport, who, with Sir Thomas Gates and Sir George Somers, was empowered to supersede the existing administration and govern the colony till the arrival of Lord Delaware.

About the middle of July the ships, then passing the West Indies, were overtaken and scattered by a storm. One small vessel was wrecked and another, having on board the commissioners, a great portion of the provisions and one hundred and fifty men, was driven ashore on one of the Bermuda Islands, where the crew remained until April of the following year. The other seven ships came safely to Jamestown. The affairs of the colony, which in the spring was so prosperous as to indicate stability and growth, with the beginning of winter was face to face with starvation. In consequence of a severe wound Captain Smith in September had returned to England. Captain Percy was left in command and the most trying period in the history of the colony began, long remembered as the “starving time.” By the last of March, 1610, only sixty persons remained alive, and these, if help had not come speedily, could hardly have lived a fortnight. Meanwhile, Sir Thomas Gates and his companions, who had been shipwrecked in the Bermudas, had constructed out of the material of their old ship, with such additional timber as they could cut from the forest, two small vessels, and set sail for Virginia, where they arrived in time to save the famishing settlers from starvation.

The colonists had now fully determined to abandon forever a place which promised them nothing but disaster and death. In pursuance of their purpose they buried their guns and cannons, and on the 8th of June Jamestown was abandoned.

As they drew near the mouth of the river the pinnace of the escaping colonists met the ships of Lord Delaware, with a reinforcement of emigrants and abundant supplies of provisions. They immediately returned to Jamestown, and were prevailed upon to remain. On June 10, 1610, the colonists began life anew with renewed hope.

In the following year the number of the colonists increased to seven hundred and several new settlements were located up the James River. But the colony did not become firmly established until 1619. At that time the colony was in a flourishing condition and in the enjoyment of civil liberty, free commerce, peace and domestic happiness. The cultivation of tobacco, commenced in 1612, was greatly profitable. The introduction of African slavery, grants of land to colonists, and encouragement given by the company to female emigrants were events and measures that contributed in a marked degree to the permanency and progress of the colony. Last and greatest of all measures and reforms was that of admitting the people to a share in legislation by the institution of a Colonial Assembly. On the 19th of June, 1619, the first Colonial Assembly ever convened in America assembled at Jamestown. The members were elected by the different plantations or boroughs, and their body was called the House of Burgesses, a name which it retained 60 long as Virginia remained a colony of England. The London Company gave its sanction to the House of Burgesses by an ordinance July 24, 1621, which may be considered as the written constitution of the colony — the first of its kind in America.

The settlements extended for a hundred and forty miles along both banks of James River and far into the interior, especially northward toward the Potomac. The Indians had seen in all this growth and prosperity the doom of their own race, and secretly plotted to destroy foes before it should be too late. They continued on terms of friendship until the very day of the massacre. The attack was planned for the 22d of March, 1622, at midday. When the fatal hour arrived, men, women and children were indiscriminately slaughtered, until three hundred and forty-seven had perished under the knives and hatchets of their savage neighbors. Jamestown and the other leading settlements had been warned by a converted Indian, who revealed the fact to a white friend. The alarm was spread and thus the greater part of the colony escaped destruction, but the outer plantations were entirely destroyed. Of eighty settlements only eight remained.

In revenge parties of English soldiers scoured the country in every direction, destroying wigwams, burning villages and killing every savage that fell in their way, until the tribes were driven into the wilderness.

From that time, the population of the colony rapidly increased by constant arrivals of large numbers of immigrants, many of whom were men of rank and fortune. The soil of Virginia was fertile, the climate genial, the forests abounded in game, and the streams filled with fish. Staple crops, produced in great abundance with little labor and sold at greatly remunerative prices, made the colonist grow rapidly rich. Large grants of land were made to colonists and to favorite subjects, which, under the law of entails, stricter than in England, and the law of primogeniture, in time, as population increased, made the families of the proprietors wealthy. The Virginia colonists were all English, cavalier English. There was a marked difference between the gay, dashing, proud, high-spirited Virginian, unused to labor or self-denial, and his more thrifty, austere and practical neighbor of the North. They belonged to essentially different classes of men. The difference between the colonists of New England and those of Virginia was as marked as that between the Roundhead and the Cavalier, or that between the Churchman and the Puritan in the mother country, or rather the difference was the same. The vice-regal court, with its elegance and mimic form of royalty, infected the manners of the gentry and kept up social distinctions among the different classes of the colonists. The proprietors of the large estates lived in luxury and ease, and some of them emulated the style of the English nobility. In the absence of other excitement they amused themselves with company, hunting, horse racing and gaming.” The established religion was that of the Church of England. And it is said that the ministers conformed as much to the tone of society around them as to the injunctions of their faith.

The elegant writer from whom we quote says, “The feudal times and baronial manners of “Merrie England” seemed revived upon this continent. Indeed, looking down from his castle-like dwelling over a broad sweep of wood and water and patrimonial fields tilled by his hundreds of slaves, the old Virginian might well feel himself scarcely less of a lord than her Saxon Franklins, or her more modem dukes or earls. ‘Old times are changed — old manners gone.’ The revelry is silent in their halls; the halls gone to decay. The very site of their mansions is covered with stunted pines and sedges, and park and garden and fields and manor, long since worn out and deserted, are grown over with briars and the undergrowth of the returning forest, and never visited save by the solitary sportsman in quest of the small game which has taken shelter in the covert.”

Where there was so much leisure and wealth there was also opportunity and taste for intellectual culture, and much attention was given to education. The sons of the rich were educated in England and provision for the educations of all was not neglected. At the bar and in her public councils, Virginia, at the commencement of the Revolution, had a distinguished array of talent, and has justly been called the “mother of presidents and statesmen.

Who were the first Waters emigrants to Virginia, and who was the founder of the family of that name in the colony of Virginia, are pertinent and interesting inquiries. To accurately answer has required much thought, diligent and patient research, and all that could be authoritatively verified has been collated and stated, in connection with a chart elsewhere contained in this work.

The tradition that the Waters emigrated from England to the colony of Virginia at an early date in the history of that settlement has been known and handed down by every generation. Colonel Jonathan D. Waters and some others claimed that the Waters came over in the Mayflower and first settled in New England, and afterwards removed to Virginia. This is a mistake. No such name appears in the list of the Mayflower passengers, landed at Plymouth in 1620. Long after the time when it is certainly known that the ancestors of these Waters were living in the Virginia colony, the established religion was the Church of England, and stringent laws were enforced against dissenters. It is hardly therefore probable that either those who were driven by religious persecution to America, or their descendants, would have willingly removed to the southern colony, where most rigorous laws against their religious faith were rigidly enforced. The family has lived in Virginia quite from the beginning of its settlement, and was unknown in the New England colony until the latter part of the seventeenth century.

Land Patent Maryland for John Waters: “Partner’s Desire” Somerset County Circuit Court Land Survey, Subdivision, and Condominium Plats MSA S1599: (Patents , SO, Tract Index) Index by Reference Reference: Patent Record CD, p. 16 Date: 1697 Description: Partners Desire, 325 Acres; Patent Developer/Owner: Waters, John, and Richard and Charles Hall.

During the seventeenth and a part of the eighteenth century a record was kept under the direction of the government at all ports of entry on the English seacoast of emigrants to her colonies, and every subject before embarking was required to take the oath of allegiance to the king and the Established Church. These records have been preserved, and from them has been compiled, by John C. Hotten, a partial list of emigrants to the colonies, including those in America.

Edward Waters, gent., was born in England in 1584, came to Virginia and before 1622 married Grace O’Neil, who was born 1603. He held the rank of Captain; Burgess in 1625, and was Commander and Commissioner of Elizabeth City in 1628. He died in England, his will being made at Great Hornmead, Hertfordshire, 20 August, 1630, and proved the 18 Sept. of that year. He left to his son, William his lands in Virginia, mentions his brother John Waters of Middleham, Yorkshire; other legatees being his wife Mrs. Grace Waters, and his daughter Margaret. The son, William, was born In Virginia before 1624. He was Burgess for Northampton county in 1654, 1659 and 1660. He died about 1685, leaving issue, six sons, Richard, John, Edward, Thomas, Obedience and William. John and Richard settled in Maryland. John married Mary Maddox, and died in 1708, leaving a son, John. Richard Waters married Elizabeth, daughter of Col. Southey Littleton of Virginia. The Arms: Sable on a fess wavy argent between three swans of the second, two bars wavy azure. Crest: A demi griffin azure. Motto: Toujours fidele. (Always Faithful) are used by the Maryland branch of the family. (Virginia heraldica: being a registry of Virginia gentry entitled to coat of arms; edited by William Armstrong Crozier)

Hotten’s list of emigrants to America between 1600 and 1700 gives a census or “list of names of those living in Virginia February 16, 1623” (1624); also contains “The muster of the inhabitants of the College land in Virginia taken the 23d of January, 1624” (1625). “Edward Waters his muster” contains names of “Edward Waters, aged 40, in ship Patience, 1608; Grace Waters, aged 21, in the Diana, 1618; William Waters; Margaret Waters, born in Virginia.” Among the land patents issued in the corporation of “James Cittie” at its incorporation, one hundred acres were patented to Edward Waters. These are the only Waters found until 1635. In that year John Waters came over in the ship Transport, of London, Edward Walker, master. John Waters was then twenty-nine years old. His name is not mentioned elsewhere in the record; whether he remained in the colony is not known. These are all of the name Waters as shown by the index to Hotten’s list.

Of those who now bear the name of Waters in Salem, Massachusetts, three distinct families have been traced, viz. : one settled chiefly in Forth Salem, descended from William Waters, an early settler of Boston; another, in the east parish, whose ancestor, Lawrence Waters, settled first in Watertown but removed to Lancaster on the founding of that settlement; and a third family whose progenitor came from England in the last century. (Note to “Gleanings from English Records,” Part I., p. 122.)

Men of mark in Maryland: biographies of leading men of the state, Volume 2 By Bernard Christian Steiner, Lynn Roby Meekins, David Henry Carroll, Thomas G. Boggs

GENERAL FRANCIS E. WATERS, of Baltimore, lumberman, financier, and one of the most prominent men of his state, both in business and public circles, is a descendant of one of the very earliest settlers of Virginia. This progenitor was Lieutenant Edward Waters, who was born in Hertfordshire, England, about 1568. There is some confusion about the exact time of the arrival of Edward Waters in Virginia. There seems to be a common agreement that he sailed from England in the Somers and Gates Expedition of 1608, that the vessel was wrecked on the Bermuda Islands, and that they were detained there for some little time, and that he finally arrived in Virginia in 1610. Another authority says that he reached Virginia in 1608 on the ship ” Patience.” This much is certain: that he lived in Virginia in the early years of the colony’s existence; that he married Grace O’Neal, who was thirty-five years his junior, and of this marriage two children were born—William and Margaret. He died about 1630, and his widow later married Colonel Obedience Robins, who died in 1662, and she survived until 1682. Lieutenant Edward Waters was a prominent man in the early days of the colony, and was instrumental in bringing a large number of people into the new settlements. In his will, recorded in Somerset House, London, he left as his executor his brother, John Waters, then a resident of England. Wm. Waters, son of Edward, born about 1619, died about 1689, was a Burgess from Northampton county from 1654 to 1660; High Sheriff of his county in 1662; Commissioner to run boundary line of the county; was appointed Commander, a position which included among his official duties that of presiding Judge of the county. This position he held for many years. That he was the son of Lieutenant Edward Waters was proven by a patent issued to him in 1646 for a thousand acres of land, wherein it is stated that he was a son of Lieutenant Edward Waters, of Elizabeth county. He was married three times, the given names of his wives being Catherine, Margaret and Dorothy. He left six sons: William, Edward, Richard, John, Thomas and Obedience. During his lifetime Colonel Waters (who held the military rank of Lieutenant-Colonel under the Colonial government) had acquired land in Somerset county, Maryland, not far distant from his home county of Northampton, both being on the eastern shore of the Chesapeake bay. In his will his real estate was divided among these six sons, and the Maryland land was given to John. John married Mary, the daughter of Lazarus Maddux, and from certain data now in existence she appears to have been a second wife. There is no evidence as to who his first wife was, and it is apparent that that connection was a short one, and she probably left no children. The second son of this second marriage was William. William married, in 1739, a daughter of Colonel Geo. Harmanson. This Colonel Harmanson had married Elizabeth Yardley, who was a daughter of Captain Argall Yardley, who was the son of Colonel Argall Yardley, who was the eldest son of Sir George Yardley and Temperance West This Sir George Yardley was one of the earliest governors of Virginia, and spelled his name Yeardley. The second son of this marriage was George. George married Elizabeth Handy, daughter of Captain Robt. Handy, a prominent man of that day. The Handy family goes back to Samuel, who was the first American progenitor and settled in Somerset county, Maryland, in 1664. The second son of George and Elizabeth (Handy) Waters was John. John was born March 4,1777, and died March, 1823. He married Elizabeth Corbin, a daughter of William and Sarah (Pollitt) Corbin. There were eight children of this marriage. Richard T. Waters, born November 24, 1817, died April 21, 1900, was the sixth child and the fourth son. Richard T. Waters married on April 7, 1841, Hester Ann Hopkins, daughter of Benj. Burton and Mary King (Gunby) Hopkins. Of this marriage there were five children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the youngest, born on May 4, 1856. It would be of great interest, if space permitted, to trace out all the family connections through these various marriages in the different generations; but it is sufficient to say here that General Waters is connected with a large number of the most prominent families of Virginia and Maryland, and especially of Maryland.

Burke, the great English authority, makes this Waters family to be of royal descent, in this way: James Methold Waters, an English gentleman, married the granddaughter of Edward III and became the progenitor of this family. His grandson, John Waters, was York Herald under Richard II. As Edward Waters brought with him to Virginia as his family coat of arms what was practically the identical coat armor used by John Waters, the York Herald, and as the English families of those days kept accurate record of their descent, it is evident that this family of Waters comes down from the founder, James Methold Waters.

Many of the names above recited, like the Handys and Gunbys and Corbins, bore an honorable part in the Revolutionary struggles. Colonel Gunby, for example, commanded one of the famous Maryland Line regiments, either the First or Second regiment, in Greene’s famous Southern Campaign. One of the Handys commanded a militia regiment William Corbin was an officer in the Revolutionary army, and a member of the Maryland legislature in 1800. Richard T. Waters, father of General Waters, began his business career in Snow Hill, Maryland. He was one of the first to operate a steam sawmill in the United States. After years of success in that section, he moved, in 1865, to Baltimore, and established business as a lumber commission merchant. In 1866 he formed a partnership with the late Greenleaf Johnson, under the firm name of Johnson & Waters, who added to the lumber commission business the manufacture of North Carolina pine lumber. This firm purchased extensive forests in Virginia and North Carolina, and erected large mills at Norfolk, Virginia. In 1874 the firm of Johnson & Waters was dissolved, Mr. Johnson continuing in the manufacturing of lumber, and Mr. Waters associating with himself his young son, Francis E. Waters, under the firm name of R. T. Waters & Son, confining their operations to a commission business. The firm of R. T. Waters & Son, of Baltimore, and Richardson, Smith, Moore & Co., of Snow Hill, Maryland, were closely allied. Mr. R. T. Waters was a most capable man. He became one of the incorporators of the Lumber Exchange of Baltimore City; was a director in the First National Bank of Snow Hill from its organization up to his death; was president of the Surry Lumber Company and also of the Surry, Sussex & Southampton Railway. He was a man of alert and sound judgment, of rigid integrity, and possessed the absolute confidence of his business associates. He was of genial temperament, readily made friends, and these friends became strongly attached to him. He was generous, and dispensed charity with a liberal hand and kindly manner. Much given to hospitality, he was never happier than when entertaining his friends. Himself a man of strong attachments, especially for the friends of his earlier days, he never under any circumstances forgot an old friend. During life he was a communicant f the Presbyterian church. In his early life he was very active in politics, and did much to promote the interests of the Democratic party on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Though he never forsook his early allegiance in politics, being a man of strong convictions and sound purpose, as the years passed by and his business interests became more pressing, he withdrew from activity in political matters and confined himself to a voting interest. He left an unblemished record, and few men of large affairs have ever been less subject to unfavorable criticism than was Richard T. Waters.

The family history and the reference to Richard T. Waters have been given at some length, because, to some extent at least, they shed light upon the temperament and character of the subject of this sketch.

In 1865 Francis E. Waters, a little boy nine years old, came to Baltimore upon his father’s removal to Baltimore, entered the public schools, and later completed his school training in the Pembroke School.

The wise father, having a prosperous and successful business, could easily have taken the boy into his own office, but he preferred for him to get his first training at the hands of others; so, at the age of fifteen, declining the college education tendered by his father, young Waters entered the wholesale hardware house of F. B. Loney & Company of Baltimore. He worked for them steadily for three years, and gained in the good graces of the firm. At the end of that time the old hardware house failed, and his father, recognizing the good qualities of the son and his business capacity, then invited him to come into his own office. This was in 1873, and the firm of R. T. Waters & Son, organized on January 1,1874, endured for more than a quarter of a century. It is worth while to stop for a moment and to consider the wisdom of the policy of R. T. Waters. He wanted the boy to learn how to stand alone. He wanted him to feel that he was making his own way, and was not dependent upon a rich father. The result of the experiment thoroughly justified it. The history of General Waters, from the time he entered the lumber business with his father in 1873, a period now of 37 years, has been one of steady growth and success. He has seen a business, which was then accounted large, grow to such proportions that what then appeared to be a large business now looks small indeed. The young man, though ambitious, took time to thoroughly master the eituation before venturing into new fields and after ten years of successful business he saw the way clear to establish a manufacturing plant, which was founded in 1885 in Surry county, Virginia, under the title of the Surry Lumber Company. The old Virginia farm of 1885 now shows what is considered by experts as the model lumber manufacturing plant of the United States, and the town of Dendrom with a population of 3000 has grown up around the mills and is maintained by the lumber plant. This plant now employs more than 2000 men and has an enormous output of the very best lumber. General Waters has given strict personal attention to every detail of this enterprise. Its largest stockholder and for many years its president, he is ably assisted in the management of its affairs by the vice-president, the Honorable John Walter Smith, ex-governor of Maryland and now United States Senator. It is probable that if the question was directly put to General Waters as to what feature of his work he would like to be judged by he would say the ” Surry Lumber Company,” for he has put the best of himself into this, has made it a marvel of efficiency as an industrial plant, paying good dividends to its owners and giving remunerative employment to a vast number of people. In addition to this he is president of the Cumberland Lumber Company, located at Wallace, Duplin county, North Carolina, at which plant more than one thousand people are employed.

For the past twenty years, with one break of a few months, General Waters has served as one of the Directors of the Maryland Penitentiary, and for a considerable part of the time has been president of the board. Often solicited to enter public life, though possessed of a large measure of public spirit, the sense of obligation to the business interests represented has compelled him to decline all public trusts or positions except those where he could render a useful public service without seriously interfering with nearer interests. Thus he served as one of the Commissioners of the State of Maryland at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis. He was appointed by Governor Jackson a member of his staff with the rank of Colonel. After the great fire in Baltimore he was one of the twelve citizens selected by Mayor McLane to recommend certain changes in the streets, and this committee so well discharged its duty that every recommendation made was accepted save one, and all men can now see that the committee was wise in that recommendation which was not accepted. General Waters is a Democrat both by inheritance and conviction. Upon the nomination of Mr. Bryan, he felt that he could not consistently support his silver ideas, and for that occasion voted against his party.

He is a member of the Maryland Club, Merchants’ Club, Baltimore Country Club and the Elk Ridge Kennel Club. His religious preferences lie with the Presbyterian church, with which his family has long been identified, and the First Presbyterian church has shown its esteem for him by electing him as one of its trustees. His diversions are travel and yachting, and his yatch “Priscilla” is one of the best-appointed upon the bay. He is a director of the Merchants’ National Bank, the American Bonding Company, the United Street Railway of Baltimore, and the Maryland, Virginia & Delaware Railroad. He is a stockholder and investor in many of the leading financial institutions of Maryland and Virginia. When the cruiser “Maryland” was launched, his daughter, Miss Jennie Scott Waters, was selected as the sponsor. When the Honorable John Walter Smith was elected Governor of Maryland, he also appointed General Waters on his staff, with the rank of Brigadier-General, Mr. Smith being the second Governor upon whose staff he has served. He enjoys the distinction of having been elected president of the Lumber Exchange before he was thirty years of age. He has also served as president of the Board of Trade of Baltimore.

On June 30, 1877, he married Miss Fannie Scott, of Toledo, Ohio, daughter of Wm. H. Scott, a public-spirited and cultivated gentleman. Her grandfather, Jesup W. Scott, was a prominent lawyer, who first lived in Bridgeport, Connecticut. He moved West to practice his profession, wisely invested his funds in lands, buying a large tract of land near Maumee, now Toledo, Ohio, and its rapid growth in value made him a very wealthy man. He was a man of fine character and pure life, and reared three sons who were exceedingly useful men in public affairs.

General Waters represents in his own person the Cavalier stock of Virginia, while his wife represents the Puritan stock of New England. The combination of these two strains of virile blood has always worked out in the later generations strong men and women, and the children of this marriage are fortunate in their racial inheritance, more than they possibly can be in any material possessions which may come to them. Mrs. Waters traces her descent in one line from that John Wakeman who came from Bewdly, England, to New Haven, Connecticut, in the year 1640; and the Wakeman genealogy published in 1900 shows that in the ‘two hundred and seventy years which have elapsed since John Wakeman became one of the pioneer settlers of Connecticut, the family has been connected with a large number of the families which have made New England great and enriched so much the civic life of the middle and western states of our country.

In so far as Francis E. Waters has had an ideal in business, that ideal may be said to be quality. He has always striven for quality first and then for enlargement. The result of this ideal is a business which is a model of organization in every department and the product of which compares favorably with that of any other concern in the country. His business associates and other men who personally know General Waters and have had dealings with him during many years bear willing testimony to his personal integrity and the absolute fairness of his business conduct. Certainly no man can live up to a higher standard than that of absolutely just dealings. The two Waters, father and son, have between them over one hundred years of successful labor in the lumber business. R. T. Waters passed away, leaving the reputation of an absolutely just man. Francis E. Waters, though of more venturous temperament than his father, has the same moral qualities, and is treading faithfully in the footsteps of his honored father.

Richard Waters of Somerset County, Maryland, Planter. Will 21 April 1720

Proved 13 November 1722. To my son William that land called Waters Rivers. To my cozin John Waters a Marsh in joynt tenancy of me and my Brother John Waters deceased and Charles Hall deceased. To my sons William, Richard, and Littleton, all the marsh being on Manokin. To my brother William Water my sloop called “Elizabeth.” To my wife Elizabeth Waters four Negroes, Scipio, Aleck, Hager, and Major, and one-half of my remaining estates. If any of my children shall marry or be married without the approbation of the Monthly meeting of the People called Quakers at West River, Mr. Robins, Richard Hill, and Thomas Chalkley of Philadelphia to have charge, etc. To daughters Elizabeth and Ester a Negro each. To my sons Richard and Littleton £250 each out of property in England left me by Uncle William Marriott, Late of Towcester, now with lands of William Cooper. John Hyde Senior, Merchant, trustee in London. Executors: Son William and Wife Elizabeth. Witnesses: John Brown, William Pearson, Edward Harper, Thomas Fairclo. Marlborough, 227.
[Proved in Maryland 12 July 1720, and recorded in Liber 16, fol. 201.]


Baltimore: Biography (Baker Waters)
By Lewis Historical Publishing Co.A man who may be aptly styled a typical Baltimorean, inasmuch as he combines the characteristics of a scion of an ancient race with the attributes of a progressive business man of the present day, is Baker Waters, manager of the lubricating oil department of the Standard Oil Company. Mr. Waters is a representative of a family of English origin, distinguished “on both sides of the sea”.

The history of the Waters family of England, Maryland and Virginia is traced back to the little town of Middleham, Yorkshire, chiefly noted for Middleham Castle, called “the fairest castle of Richmondshire”, where the white roses of the York faction nodded defiance to the red roses of Lancaster, during the famous Wars of the Roses. The fortress castle was built by Robert Fitz-Rolph, upon whom all Wensleydale was bestowed by Canan le Petit, Earl of Brittany and Richmond, and it was afterward the seat of the Earl of Salisbury, father of the great Earl of Warwick. King Richard the Third frequently resided here, and in this fortress his son Edward was born.

James Methold Waters is said to have married the granddaughter of Edward the Third of England, and John Waters, grandson of James Methold Waters, was the York herald at the court of Richard the Second. The family is said to have continued in royal favor until the reign of Charles the Second. From the branch of the family to which belonged John Waters, the York herald, are descended the Maryland and Virginia representatives of the race. It appears that there is a New York branch, descended from T. Leeds Waters, but the coats-of-arms are different.

The arms, crest and motto borne by the branch of the family which included John Waters, York herald at the court of Richard the Second, are as follows: Arms: Sable, on a fesse wavy, argent, between three swans of the second; two bars wavy, azure. Crest: A demi talbot, argent; in the mouth an arrow, gules. Motto: Toujours fid&le.

The Waters family, so prominent on the Eastern Shore of Maryland, is descended from John Waters, brother of Lieutenant Edward Waters, the immigrant ancestor of the Virginia family. There is a John Waters mentioned in connection with the earliest history of Montgomery county, Maryland, and the Waters name continues to this day one of the most prominent in that section of the state. It is claimed that John Waters, who settled in Maryland had five sons: William, mentioned below; Richard, who settled in Montgomery county; Joseph, who settled in Somerset county; Edwin; Samuel.

(II) William Waters, son of John Waters, lived at Belmont. Montgomr ery county, near the present site of Brookeville, and was the owner of much land in that neighborhood. The homestead has ever since remained uninterruptedly in possession of the family. William Waters married, in 1747i in St. Mary’s county, Mary, daughter of Thomas and Sarah (Offutt) Harris, of Tudor Hall, in that county, and they were the parents of eight children, including Ignatius, mentioned below. William Waters and his wife were buried on the homestead, and the will of the former is on file at Rockville, Maryland.

(III) Ignatius Waters, son of William and Mary (Harris) Waters, married Elizabeth, daughter of Captain Eli and Sallie (Worthington) Dorsey, and fourteen children were born to them, among them Washington, mentioned below.

(IV) Washington Waters, son of Ignatius and Elizabeth (Dorsey) Waters, was born in Montgomery county. He was a member of the medical profession. He took a prominent part in public affairs, being three times elected to the State Senate and twice to the Legislature, and serving as amember of the Constitutional Convention in Maryland. He married (first) Mrs. Anne Dorsey Williams, by whom he had three children: Washington D., mentioned below; Eliza; Harriet. Dr. Waters married (second) Mary MacCubbin Waters, and (third) Eleanor Madgruder Briscoe. There were no children by the second and third marriages. Dr. Waters died in 1882.

(V) Washington D. Waters, son of Washington and Anne (Dorsey) (Williams) Waters, was born in Montgomery county. He followed the calling of a farmer. He married Virginia, daughter of Z. M. Waters, of Maryland, and their children were: Baker, mentioned below; Ann Elizabeth, married William Penn Savage, of Alabama; Lillian, died in 1890; Washington, married Lillian Keener, of Baltimore; Harriet A., married Percy Wilson, of Staunton, Virginia; William B., married Ellen Brewer, of Rockville, Maryland. Washington and William B. Waters are both employed in the sales department of the Standard Oil Company, Washington, D. C. Mr. Waters, the father of the family, is now leading a retired life at Rockville, Maryland.

(VI) Baker Waters, eldest child of Washington D. and Virginia (Waters) Waters, was born May 13, 1862. on his father’s farm, near Gaithersburg, Montgomery county, Maryland, where he passed the first eighteen years of his life, assisting his father in the care of the estate. From 1878 to 1882 he attended the Randolph Macon College, at Ashland, Virginia, receiving in the latter year a scholarship to the Maryland Agricultural College, which he entered in the autumn of 1882, remaining until 1884. He was then obliged to leave on account of the recent death of his grandfather, and entered at once upon a business career, becoming eastern contract and settling agent for the William Deering Company, now part of the International Harvesting Company. He quickly gave evidence of his aptitude in grappling with details and of his accurate perception and judgment, and these qualities, aided by his sturdy will, steady application, tireless industry and sterling integrity, laid the foundation of his present high reputation as a business man. After representing the concern for about two years he associated himself, in 1888, with C. West & Sons, who were engaged in the oil business, their establishment being situated on Lombard street, Baltimore. In October, 1888, in consequence of the death of William West, the firm went out of existence, and Mr. Waters then entered the service of the Standard Oil Company, beginning in the sales department, where he remained until 1890, when he was promoted to his present position of manager of the lubricating oil department. This office he has filled continuously to the present time, and has for many years been recognized as a man of influence in business circles, possessing a weight of character and a keen discrimination which make him a forceful factor among his colleagues and associates. In business transactions he exhibits the quick appreciation and prompt decision which are as necessary to the successful merchant as to the victorious general, and in discussing commercial affairs, his manner, however keen and alert, is tempered with a courtesy which never fails to inspire a feeling of friendly regard in conjunction with the respect which his reputation and personality invariably command.

While assiduous in business affairs, Mr. Waters is moved by a generous interest in his fellow-citizens, promoting every suggestion for the welfare of the city of Baltimore and the State of Maryland, and is a quiet but potent factor in many political and social movements. His family has always been identified with the Democratic party, but notwithstanding the force of tradition Mr. Waters does not ally himself with any political organization, but reserves the right to cast his vote, irrespective of partisan ties and party platforms, for the man whom he deems best fitted to serve the interests of the commonwealth. He is a member of the Baltimore Chamber of Commerce, and in private life his amiable and generous disposition has endeared him to hosts of friends. He is a gentleman in every sense of the word, fine-looking, courteous and dignified, kindly in manner and speech and, though quick and decisive in character, always considerate of others and exceedingly generous. He is a member of the Patapsco Hunt Club, the Zeta Chapter of the Kappa Alpha Fraternity and the Baltimore Yacht Club, having formerly served as chairman of the house committee of the last-named organization.

Mr. Waters married, October 20, 1886, in Baltimore, Lillian Wilmer, daughter of Jasper M. and Lydia (Emory) Berry, the latter a daughter of Judge Hopper Emory, and they have been the parents of two children: Wilmer Berry, born July 23, 1887, now attending Johns Hopkins University; Lydia Duke, born in 1889, died June 1, 1890. Mrs. Waters is one of those women who combine with perfect womanliness and domesticity an unerring judgment, a union of qualities of great value to her husband, making her not alone his charming companion, but also his confidante and adviser.

Mr. Waters’ advice in regard to attaining success is well worthy the serious consideration of all young men beginning life. He says: “Stick right to whatever you have undertaken to do until it is accomplished. It is necessary for one to select a line of business for which he is best fitted, and that is in the direction that will be a pleasure rather than a bore.” These conditions, Mr. Waters, as his record bears witness, has strictly and most successfully complied with, and in all relations, both as business man and citizen, his rule of life has been the motto of his ancient house, “Toujours Udele”.

Waters of Somerset County, Maryland tax assessment of 1783

Edward Waters. W. Addition to Timber Tract, 626 acres. SO Dividing Creek p. 117
Edward Waters. Addition to Back Hole, 246 acres. SO Dividing Creek p. 117
Edward Waters. Fortunes Folly, 66 acres. SO Dividing Creek p. 117
Edward Waters. Hog Yard, 50 acres. SO Dividing Creek p. 117
George Waters. Suffolk, 446 1/2 acres. SO Dividing Creek p. 117
George Waters. Hop At A Venture, 75 acres. SO Dividing Creek p. 117
George Waters. W. Enlargement, 165 acres. SO Dividing Creek p. 117
George Waters. Waters’ Addition, 11 acres. SO Dividing Creek p. 117
John Waters. Salem, 490 acres. SO Great Annamessex p. 107
John Waters. New Rumney, 43 acres. SO Great Annamessex p. 107
John Waters. Jones’ Chance, 100 acres. SO Rewastico p. 58. MSA S1161-9-11. 1/4/5/52
John Waters. Tubmanns Lott, 37 1/3 acres. SO Rewastico p. 58. MSA S1161-9-11. 1/4/5/52
John Waters. Quantico, 27 acres. SO Rewastico p. 58. MSA S1161-9-11. 1/4/5/52
John Waters. Dormans Delight, 250 acres. SO Rewastico p. 58. MSA S1161-9-11. 1/4/5/52
John Waters. Shiles’ Choice, 220 acres. SO Rewastico p. 58. MSA S1161-9-11. 1/4/5/52
John Waters. Downs Chance, 60 acres. SO Rewastico p. 58. MSA S1161-9-11. 1/4/5/52
Littleton Waters. Envy, 408 acres. Notes: Heirs. SO Great Annamessex p. 109
Littleton Waters. Partnership, 125 acres. Notes: Heirs. SO Great Annamessex p. 109
Richard Waters. Flat Land, 840 acres. SO Great Annamessex p. 107
Richard Waters. Friends Kindness, 116 acres. SO Great Annamessex p. 107
Richard Waters. Waters River, 525 acres. SO Great Annamessex p. 107
Richard Waters. Conveniency, 80 acres. SO Great Annamessex p. 107
Richard Waters. London Gift, 50 acres. SO Great Annamessex p. 107
Richard Waters. Security, 52 acres. SO Great Annamessex p. 107
Richard Waters. Envy, pt, 70 acres. SO Great Annamessex p. 107
Richard Waters. Millers Choice, 70 acres. SO Great Annamessex p. 107
Rose Waters. Waters’ Addition, 136 acres. SO Great Annamessex p. 107
Rose Waters. Waters’ River, 352 1/2 acres. SO Great Annamessex p. 107
Sarah Waters. SO Great Annamessex p. 109
Spencer Waters. Cager Island, 700 acres. Notes: Heirs. SO Great Annamessex p. 107
Spencer Waters. Teagues Addition, 78 acres. Notes: Heirs. SO Great Annamessex p. 107
Spencer Waters. TD in the L: Choice, 26 acres. Notes: Heirs; Tract name is difficult to read. SO Great Annamessex p. 107
Thomas Waters. Last Purchase, 300 acres. SO Wicomico p. 76
William Waters. Walterton, 97 1/4 acres. SO Great Annamessex p. 107
William Waters. Wilsons Lott, 20 acres. SO Great Annamessex p. 107
William Waters. Beach & Pine, 50 acres. SO Great Annamessex p. 107
William Waters. SO Great Annamessex p. 109

Genealogical history of the Lewis Family

Taken from: “Some prominent Virginia families: Volume 2 – Page 620″ by Louise Pecquet du Bellet, Edward Jaquelin, Martha Cary Jaquelin

lewis-arms

Motto translated means”Every land is a brave man’s country.”

It is a question very often discussed of late as to whether the hour makes the man or the man the hour. To a student of the history of Virginia an answer is very soon given, for since the settlement of Jamestown, in 1607, which was virtually the birth of this country, there has never arisen a crisis of any kind when Virginia, our mother State, has not had one or more of her sons ready to meet it. When the hour arrives the man appears. We may search the pages of history in vain for a nobler or as noble a group of men as Washington and his patriot Virginians in 1776.

The Lewis family of Virginia is one of the most distinguished families in the State. It is connected by marriage with many of the best-known names, such as Washington. Marshall, Fielding, Merriweather, Daingerfield, Taliaferro and others. The men of the family from the time when they first settled in the colony, about the middle of the seventeenth century, have been men of action and distinction; they have won for themselves the most remarkable record as soldiers. It is recorded on the tombstone of “Pioneer John” that he furnished five sons for the Revolution. There were five colonels in the Revolution—Colonel Nicholas, Colonel Fielding, Colonel William, Colonel Charles and Colonel Joel—and quite a number of majors and captains. The Lewises also won a gallant record in the War of 1812, the Mexican War and in the Confederate States Army.

The Lewis family were originally French Huguenots, and left France after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, 1685. Three brothers—namely, William, Samuel and John—fled to England. (See “History of the Huguenots.”) Shortly afterwards William removed to the north of Ireland, where he married a Miss McClelland; Samuel fixed his residence in Wales, while John continued in England. Descendants of each of these three brothers are supposed to have settled in Virginia.

About the middle of the seventeenth century four brothers of the Lewis family left Wales.

I. Samuel Lewis, went to Portugal; nothing is known of him.

II. William Lewis, d. in Ireland.

III. General Robert Lewis, d. in Gloucester Co., Va.

IV. John Lewis, d. in Hanover Co., Va.

1. I. William Lewis1, one of the Welsh brothers; d. in Ireland. Married Miss McClelland and left one son:

2. I. Andrew Lewis3. Married Miss Calhoun.
They had Issue:

3. I. John Lewis2, b. 1678, in Ireland. Married Margaret Lynn.

4. II. Samuel Lewis2, b. 1680. ‘No issue.

III. John Lewis3 (Andrew2, William1). In 1720 John Lewis left Ireland a fugitive, having stabbed Sir Inango Campbell, his Irish landlord, who attempted in a lawless and brutal manner to evict him from his premises, of which he held a freehold lien, and had slain an invalid brother, before his eves. He first took refuge in Portugal, and later fled to America and settled in Pennsylvania; then in Augusta Co., Va. In Campbell’s “History of Virginia” he is styled as Pioneer John Lewis. He is described as being tall and of great muscular strength, and was one of the best backwoodsmen of his day. He built his house with portholes in it, so that he could successfully contend with the savage tribes that infested the country. When Augusta County was organized he was the founder of Staunton, the county seat, and was one of the first magistrates appointed by the Governor. John Lewis died in 1762. On his tombstone it is recorded that he gave five sons to fight the battles of the American Revolution.

John Lewis and Margaret Lynn, his wife, had issue:

.”>. I. Samuel Lewis4, served with distinction as a captain in the war between the English and French colonists. His brothers, Andrew. William and Charles, were members of his company, and all four were at Braddock’s defeat, and three of them were wounded. Samuel was afterwards conspicuous in the defense of Greenbrier County and the border settlements from the Indians. He was born 1716: d. unmarried.

6. II. Thomas Lewis4, b. in Ireland, 1718.

7. III. Andrew Lewis4, b. in Ireland, 1750.

8. IV. William Lewis4, b. in Ireland, 1724.

9. V. Margaret Lewis4, b. in Ireland, 1726.

10. VI. Anne Lewis4, b. in Ireland, 1728.

11. VII. Charles Lewis4, b. in Virginia, 1736.

Alice Lewis4. Married Mr. Madison.

IV. Col. Andrew Lewis4 (John”, Andrew2, William1), son of John Lewis (Pioneer) and Margaret Lynn, daughter of the Laird of Loch Lynn, chieftain of the once powerful Clan of Loch Lynn: b. in Ireland, 1720. He emigrated with his father to America, and settled in Augusta Co., Va. He took a very active part in the Indian Wars. In 1754 he was twice wounded in the battle of Fort Necessity, under General Washington, by whom he was appointed major of hie regiment. General Lewis was, with four of his brothers, in a company of which the eldest was captain, at Braddock’s defeat, in 1758. “General Andrew Lewis was several times a member of the Colonial Legislature.

An Indian war being anticipated, Lord Dunmore appointed General Lewis commander of the Southern forces. September 11, 1774, General Lewis, with eleven hundred men, commenced his march through the wilderness. After a march of one hundred and sixty miles they reached Point Pleasant, at the junction of the Great Kanawha and Ohio rivers, and there on October 10, 1774, he signally defeated the Shawnee Indians. He is known as the hero of Point Pleasant. His strikingly majestic form and figure never failed to remind me of the memorable remark made by the Governor of the colony of New York, when General Lewis was a commissioner on behalf of Virginia at the treaty of Fort Stanwix, in New York, in 1768, that “the earth seemed to tremble under him as he walked along.” His statue is one of those around that of the father of his country, in Capitol Square, Richmond, Va.; it is marked with the name of Andrew Lewis, the “Hero of Point Pleasant.”

General Washington, under whom Lewis had served in various capacities, had formed such a high estimate of Lewis’s character and ability, it is said, that when the chief command of the Revolutionary army was proposed to Washington, he expressed a wish that it had been given to General Lewis. General Lewis died in 1781.

General Andrew Lewis married (1749) Elizabeth Givens, of Augusta Co., Va., and left issue:

12. I. Captain John Lewis5, who was an officer under his father at Grant’s defeat, when he was made prisoner and carried to Quebec and thence to France. Married Patsy Love of Alexandria, Va. Issue:

13. I. Andrew Samuel Lewis5. Married Miss Whilby.

14. II. Charles Lewis5. Married daughter of Gen. Abraham Trigg, of Virginia.

15. III. Elizabeth Lewis5. Married, second, Mr. Ball; third,

Mr. Marshall. (Her first husband was Mr. Luke, of Alexandria, Va.)

16. II. Thomas Lewis”. Married Miss Evans, of Point Pleasant, Va.

17. III. Colonel Samuel Lewis5, U. S. A.; d. unmarried in Greenbrier Co., Va.

18. IV. Colonel Andrew Lewis”, V. S. A. of the Brent

Mountain, b. 1759. Married Eliza, daughter of John Madison, of Montgomery Co., Va.; d. 1844.
They had Issue:

19. I. Charles Lewis5, d. unmarried.

20. II. Thomas Lewis5, a distinguished lawyer who killed and was killed by Mr. McHenry in a duel with rifles at the distance of thirty yards, the first duel at close quarters ever fought with rifles in Virginia. Left no issue.

21. III. — Lewis8, d. young.

22. IV. . Lewis5, d. young.

23. V. Agatha Lewis”, b. 1778. Married Col. Elijah McClanahan, of Botetourt Co., Va.

24. V. Annie Lewis”. Married Roland Madison, of Kentucky.
They had Issue:

25. I. John Madison”.

26. II. Eliza Lewis Madison”. Married Mr. Worthington of Maryland.

27. III. Andrew Lewis Madison”, d. captain in U. S. A.

28. IV. Roland Madison”, Jr., lived (1873) in Rushville, Indiana.

29. VI. William Lewis”, b. 1764. Married, first, Lucy, daughter of John Madison; second, Nancy McClenahan.

1. 1. General Robert Lewis1^ brother of William Lewis1, with his wife and two sons came to Virginia in 1645, in the good ship “Blessing.” The names of the sons were:

2. I. Colonel John Lewis2, Sr.

3. II. William Lewis2, of Chemokins, St. Peters Parish. New Kent Co., Va.

I. Colonel John Lewis2 Sr. (General Robert Lewis1). Married Isabella Warner, daughter of Augustine Warner, of Warner Hall, Gloucester Co., Va., Speaker of the first House of Burgesses.
They had issue:
4. I. Major John Lewis3, Jr., of Gloucester Co., Va., ii member of the Virginia Council, b. Nov. 30, 1669. Married Frances Fielding. She d. 1731; he d. 1754.

5. II. Warner Lewis3. Married Eleanor, widow of William Gooch, son of Sir William Gooch, Governor of Virginia, and daughter of James Bowles, of Maryland.

0. III. Lewis3. Married Col. Willis, of Fredericksburg, Va.

7. IV. Lewis3. Married Francis Merriweather.

8. V. Major John Lewis3.

9. VI. Isabella Lewis3.

10. VII. Anna Lewis3.
III. Major John Lewis3 (John2, Robert1), of Gloucester Co., Va., member of the Virginia Council, b. November 30, 1669. Married Frances Fielding: d. 1731. He d. 1754. Issue:

11. I. Colonel Robert Lewis4, of Belvoir, Albemarle Co., Va.

12. II. Colonel Charles Lewis4, of the Byrd.

13. III. Colonel Fielding Lewis4. Married, first, Catherine; second, Betty Washington.

IV. Warner Lewis4 (Warner3, John2, Robert1), son of Warner Lewis3 and Eleanor Gooch. Married, first. Mary Chiswell; second, Mary Fleming.

Issue by first marriage:

14. I. Warner Lewis”. Married Courtenay Norton. Issue: I. Courtenay Warner Lewis5. Married Mr. Selden, of Gloucester, Va.

IV. Colonel Fielding Lewis4 (Major John Lewis3 Sr, Col. John Lewis2 Sr-, General Robert Lewis1), second son of Warner Lewis and Eleanor Gooch. Married Agnes Hanvood. They lived at Weyanoke, on the James River. Fielding Lewis held a high place in society, and was considered one of the fathers of Virginia agriculture. His portrait, with that of John Taylor, of Caroline, and other distinguished agriculturists, may now be seen in the rooms of the Agricultural Society of Richmond, placed there by order of the society. Issue:

15. I. Margaret Waddrop Lewis”.

16. II. Frances Fielding Lewis”.

17. III. Anne Lewis””.

18. IV. Frances Lewis7′.

19. V. Eleanor W. Lewis”.

Margaret W. Lewis5 married Thomas Marshall, eldest son of Chief Justice Marshall. Their descendants are given in Volume I, Chapters V, VI, VII.

Eleanor Warner Lewis”. Married Robert Douthat. Their descendants now living in Baltimore are:

I. Mr. Montgomery 0. Selden, his children Allen and Elizabeth Selden.

II. Mr. Bolling Selden, his children Mrs. Swope, Susan P.
Selden, Agnes Lewis Selden and Alice Selden.

The descendants of Mrs. Courtenay Warner Lewis, who married Mr. William Selden, of Gloucester, are:

Mrs. Charles Dimmock, Mrs. William Dimmock, and Mrs. Loyd Tabb. This branch of the family inherited Warner Hall in Gloucester.

V. Frances Fielding Lewis5 (Fielding4. Warner’1, John2, Robert1), daughter of Fielding Lewis and Agnes Harwood, his wife. Married Archibald Taylor, of Norfolk, Va. Issue:

20. I. Fielding Lewis Taylor”, a colonel in the Confederate army, who was killed in a battle. Married Farley Fauntleroy. Issue:

21. I. Archibald Taylor7. Married Martha Fauntleroy.

Issue:

22. I. Archibald Taylor”.

23. II. Thomas Taylor8, served under Gen. Robert E. Lee

in the Confederate army. He was killed at the Battle of Shiloh. V. Eleanor Warner Lewis8 (Fielding4. Warner3, John2, Robert1), daughter of Fielding Lewis and Agnes Harwood, his wife. Married Robert Douthat, of Weyanoke. Issue:

I Robert Douthat5. Married, first, Mary Ambler Marshall; second, Betty W. Wade. Issue Vol. I.

The issue of William H. Selden and Jane Douthat, were:
I. Robert Selden..
II. Eleanor Selden.

III. William Selden.

IV. Bolling Selden.
V. Agnes Selden.

VI. Montgomery Selden.
VII. Lewis Selden.

IV. Col. Robert Lewis4 (Major John Lewis2, John2, Robert1), of Belvoir, Albemarle Co., Va. Married Jane, daughter of Nicholas Merriweather; d. 1757. His will is recorded in Albemarle Co., Va.

IV. Col. Charles Lewis4 (Major John Lewis3, John2, Robert1), of the Byrd. Married Lucy, daughter of John Taliaferro, of the Manor Plantation, of Snow Creek, Spottsylvania Co., Va., about 1750.

IV. Colonel Fielding Lewis4 (Major John Lewis3, John2, Robert1), son of Major John Lewis and Frances Fielding, his wife. Married (1746) Catherine Washington, a cousin of General Washington; second, Betty Washington, sister of General Washington.

Col. Fielding settled near Fredericksburg, Va. He was a member of the House of Burgesses, a merchant and vestryman. There is in the possession of a descendant of Col. Fielding Lewis and his wife, Betty Washington, an old family Bible, a hereditary relic for five generations, having been given by Mary Ball Washington to her only daughter, Betty (Mrs. Fielding Lewis), and transmitted directly to her descendants. During the Revolution, in 1776, Col. Fielding Lewis was an ardent patriot and did special service by superintending the manufacture of arms for the use of the army.

Col. Fielding Lewis and Catherine Washington, his first wife, had issue:

24. I. John Lewis5, b. 1747. Married five times.

25. II. Francis Lewis5, d. young.

26. III. Warner Lewis5, d. young. Issue by second wife:

27. IV. Fielding Lewis”.

28. V. Augustine Lewis”.

29. VI. Warner Lewis”.

30. VII. George Washington Lewis”
.
31. VIII. Mary Lewis”. married William Lyons

32. IX. Charles Lewis”.

33. X. Samuel Lewis”.

34. XL Bettie Lewis”.

35. XII. Lawrence Lewis”.

36. XIII. Robert Lewis”.

37. XIV. Howell Lewis5, b. 1771. Married Miss Pollard, and

left issue.

V. John Lewis5 (Fielding4, John1, John2, Robert1), son of Col. Fielding Lewis and Catherine Washington, his first wife, b. 1747. He was a graduate of Oxford. England, and died in Logan County, Kentucky. Married five times, first, Lucy Thornton: second, Elizabeth, daughter of Gabriel Jones; third, Miss Jones; fourth, Mary Ann Fontaine, widow of Bowles Armistead; fifth, Mrs. Mercer, nee Carter.

V. Fielding Lewis5 (Fielding4, John2, John2, Robert1), fourth son of Col. Fielding Lewis. Married and died in Fairfax Co., Va., leaving no male issue. Issue:

38. I. Catherine Lewis8. Married Henry Chew Dade. 3!l. II. Lucinda Lewis5. Married Gilson Foote.

V. George W. Lewis5 (Fielding4, John2, John2, Robert1), seventh son of Col. Fielding, b. June 24, 1755. He was a captain in Colonel Baylor’s regiment of cavalry, during the Revolutionary War, and commander of General Washington’s life-guards. It is said that General Mercer expired in his arms at the battle of Princeton. Married Miss Daingerfield and lived in Clarke Co., Va.; died at his county seat, Marmion, in 1871. He enjoyed the highest confidence of General Washington and was sent by him on a secret expedition to Canada.

George Washington Lewis and Miss Daingerfield, his wife, had issue:

40. I. Mary Lewis”. Married Col. Byrd Willis. (See Willis Family, Chapter IX.)

41. II. Daingerfield Lewis”.

42. III. Samuel Lewis”.

43. IV. Bettie Lewis”, b. 1765. Married Charles Carter.

(See Carter Family, Chapter VII.)

V. Lawrence Lewis5 (Fielding4, John3, John2, Robert1), twelfth son of Colonel Fielding Lewis, b. 1767. He lived on his estate, Woodlawn, near Mount Vernon. He was the adopted son and executor of the will of General “Washington. Married Eleanor Parke Custis, daughter of Washington Parke Custis, adopted child of Mrs. Washington. They had issue:

44. I. Lorenzo Lewis”.

45. II. Lawrence Lewis”.

46. III. Frances Parke Lewis”.

47. IV. Washington Lewis”, lived in Clarke Co., Va. His descendants own many of the old family portraits, among them those of Col. Fielding Lewis and his second wife, Betty Washington. V. .Robert Lewis3 (Fielding4, John2, John2, Robert1), thirteenth son of Col. Fielding Lewis and Betty Washington, his second wife; was private secretary to General Washington during his presidential term. Married Miss Brown and settled in Fredericksburg, Va. Issue:

48. I. Daughter Lewis5. Married Rev. Edward McGuire of Fredericksburg, Va.

49. II. Daughter Lewis”. Married George W. Bassett, of Richmond, Va.

From Bishop Meade’s “Old Families”.we quote the following account:

Among the families who belonged to Pohick Church was that of Mr. Lawrence Lewis, nephew of General Washington. He married Miss Custis, the granddaughter of Mrs. Washington. In many of the pictures of the Washington family she may be seen as a girl in a group with the General, Mrs. Washington, and her brother. Washington Parke Custis. There were two full sisters, Mrs. Law and Mrs. Peter. Mrs. Custis, the widow of Washington Parke Custis, married second. Dr. David Stuart, first of Hope Parish and then of Ossian Hall, Fairfax Co., Va. One of the sons of Lorenzo Lewis married a daughter of Beverly Johnson, of Baltimore, Md.

John Lewis, Sr., one of the original brothers, who emigrated from Wales to America, was born about 1640. He lived with the Mastyns, an ancient and wealthy family of Denbighshire, Wales. He died in Hanover Co., Va., 1726, where his will can be found on record. This John Lewis, Sr., was the great-great-grandfather of William Terrill Lewis, of Louisville, Winston Co., Miss., author of the Lewis genealogy, from which the dates of this article have been largely drawn. In his will John Lewis mentions the names of his children:

2. I. Rebecca Lewis3.

3. II. Abraham Lewis3.

4. III. Sarah Lewis3.

5. IV. Angelica Lewis’2.

6. V. David Lewis3.

7. VI. John Lewis2.

II. David Lewis2 (John1), Sr., fifth son of John I/iwis, Sr., was born in Hanover Co., Va., about 1685. Married, first, Miss Terrill, by whom he had eight children.

William, James and John Terrill were brothers of AngloNorman descent. They came to America about 1660, as huntsmen for King James II, of England, and settled in Gloucester Co., Va. For their dexterity in hunting they wire awarded by the King fifteen hundred acres of land, to be selected by themselves. The Terrills are of Anglo-Norman origin and descend from Sir Walter Tyrell, a Norman knight who came into England with William the Conqueror, A. D. 1066. David Lewis, Sr., fifth child of the emigrant, moved from Hanover Co., Va., and settled in Albemarle. Co., Va., about 1750, where he died in 1779. He married twice and left eleven children. William Terrill Lewis3, the eldest child of David Lewis, Sr., b. 1718, Hanover Co., Va., moved to Albemarle Co., Va., and was the third settler in that county. William Lewis, Sr., was one of the first men who volunteered their services in Albemarle Co., Va., to resist the high-handed measures of Lord Dunmore in 1774.

IV. Col. Robert Lewis4 (John3, John2, Robert1), of Belvoir, Albemarle Co., Va., son of Major John Lewis3 and Frances Fielding Lewis, his wife. Married Jane, daughter of Nicholas Meriwether. He died in 1757, leaving five children. Issue: I. Robert Lewis”. II. John Lewis”.

III. Charles Lewis”.

IV. Nicholas Lewis5.
V. William Lewis”.

V. William Lewis5 (Robert4, John2, John2, L’obert1) was captain in the State line during the Revolution. Married Lucy Meriwether, daughter of Thomas Meriwether, by whom he had three children:

I. Meriwether Lewis”.
II. Reuben Lewis”.
III. Jane Lewis”.

VI. Meriwether Lewis” (William5, Robert4, John2, John2, Robert1), generally called the “Oregon Explorer,” son of Captain William I.ewis, b. August 18, 1774. His father died when he was very young and he grew up under the care of his uncle, Col. Nicholas Lewis. Thomas Jefferson gives a very interesting sketch of Meriwether Lewis, who was for two years his private secretary. He says: “He was remarkable, even in infancy, for enterprise, boldness and discretion. When only eight years old he habitually went out in the dead of the night alone with his dogs into the forest to hunt the raccoon and opossum. At the age of thirteen he was put to the Latin school and continued until eighteen.”

At the age of twenty he engaged as a volunteer in the body of militia called out by General Washington for service in the western part of the United States. At twenty-three he was promoted to a captaincy. In 1792 Thomas Jefferson proposed to the American Philosophical Society that they should set on foot a subscription to engage some competent person to explore the region by ascending the Missouri, crossing the Stony Mountains and descending the nearest river to the Pacific. Captain Lewis, being then stationed at Charlottesville, warmly solicited Jefferson to obtain for him the execution of the expedition, although it was explained to him that the person engaged to go should be accompanied by a single companion only, to avoid exciting alarm among the Indians. This did not deter him, but the proposal did not succeed. In 1803 Congress approved the plan and voted a man of money to carry it into execution. Captain Lewis, who had been private secretary for Jefferson for two years, renewed his solicitations to have the direction of the party. His request was granted, and as it was necessary that he should have some competent person with him, in case of accident to himself, William Clarke, brother of General Rogers Clarke, was selected and approved, receiving a commission as captain. In April. 1803, a draft of his instructions was sent to Captain Lewis, and on the 5th of July, 1803. they left Washington and proceeded to Pittsburg. The two explorers. Lewis and Clarke, returned to St. Louis on the 23d of September. 180(>. having been gone a little over three years. The old accounts of the expedition tell us, “Never did a similar event excite more joy throughout the United States.” Captain Lewis was soon after appointed Governor of Louisiana and Captain Clarke a general of its militia, and agent of the United States for Indian affairs in the department. Captain Meriwether Lewis died October 11. 1809, aged 35.

The Virginia ‘Heraldry gives (February 11, 1906): “There seems to have been some doubt for a time as to which of Col. Robert Lewis’ sons married Catherine Fauntleroy. Some genealogists stated that it was Robert, but it has been proved that he married his cousin, Frances Lewis.”

I believe that there is now a record of the marriage of John Lewis- and Catherine Fauntleroy in Washington. However that may be, there seems to be no doubt that John is the Lewis who married Catherine.

V. John Lewis5 (Robert4, John2, John2, Robert1), son of Col. Robert Lewis and Jane Meriwether, his wife. Married Catherine Fauntleroy, daughter of Col. William Fauntleroy, of Naylor’s Hole (he mentions his daughter Catherine Lewis in his will, dated 1757), and his wife, Apphia Bushrod, and great-granddaughter of Col. Moore Fauntleroy, who emigrated to America before 1C43. and who was the twenty-first generation of descent from Henry I, of France (Browning’s “Americans of Royal Descent”).

In Deed Book No. 5, of the Albemarle County Records (pp. 191, 192 and 299), he describes himself as “John Lewis, of Halifax Co., Va., in three separate deeds, in which his wife Catherine joins as party to same. He qualified as executor to his father’s will in 1766 (Albemarle records). He left Halifax and went to reside on the Dan River, in North Carolina.

John Lewis and Catherine Fauntleroy, his wife, had issue:
I. Sallie Lewis”, b. 1761. Married (Aug. 10, 1780) Philip
Taylor. Mr. Williams, of Asheville, N. C., has an old
prayer-book that belonged to Philip Taylor, an ancestor of his, which contains the record of the marriage and the fact of her being the daughter of John and Catherine Lewis.

II. Apphia Fauntleroy Lewis”. Married David Allen, who lived on the Dan River, five miles from Danville, Pittsylvania Co., Va. A great-aunt, who died only a few years ago, by name Apphia Lewis Hightower, gave the facts to my cousin, with the names of the children. She spent much of her time at the old plantation on the Dan River with her grandparents. Apphia Fauntleroy Lewis and her husband, David Allen, had issue: I. Lewis Buckner Allen7, b. 1773; d. July 20, 1835, at Hickory Flat, near Florence, Ala. Married Mary Catherine Jones, daughter of Richard C. Jones and Elizabeth Crowley Ward, of Amelia Co., Va.

II. Julius Allen7, a bachelor, who inherited the old home on the Dan River and afterward left it to his nephew. David Allen.

III. Fauntleroy Allen7.

IV. Felix Allen7. Married Margaret White.
V. Christian Allen7. Married Sallie Fortson.

VI. Sallie Fauntleroy Allen7. Married Joseph Woodson.
VII. David Bushrod Allen7, moved to Mississippi.
VIII. Marv Meriwether Allen7. Married John Ross.

VII. Lewis Buckner Allen7 and Mary Catherine Jones left issue:

I. Elizabeth Crowley Allen”, b. 1817; d. March 5, 1849,
Alabama. Married (April 3, 1834) Captain Clinton
Heslep.

II. William Ward Allen”. Married and moved to Texas.

III. Ann Catherine Allen”. Married John Donalson; descend

ants live in Aberdeen, Miss.

IV. John Lewis Allen8. Married Josephine Middlebrook.

V. Apphia Lewis Allen”. Married John Hightower; descendants live in Texas. VI. Richard Allen”, d. single. VIII. Elizabeth Crowley Allen” was b. 1817: d. March 5, 1849. Married (April 3, 1834) Captain Clinton Heslep, b. December 10, 1810, in West Calm, Pa., and was the son of Joseph Heslep and wife, Susan Kendig. Joseph Heslep moved to Kentucky in 1813 and then to Alabama. He was very wealthy, having developed the first iron works in that part of the country. His sister Hanna married Bernard Van Leer, and they were the ancestors of the Van Leers of Nashville, Tenn.

Elizabeth Crowley Allen and her husband, Captain Clinton Heslep. left issue:

I. Mary Cornelia Heslep”, b. 1835. at Hickory Flat, near
Florence, Ala.: d. at Florence, 1902. Married John
Hood. Issue:
I. James Hood1″.
II. Lizzie Hood1″. Married Harris.

III. John Hood1″, of the United States Navy.

IV. Chalmers Hood1″.
V. Cole Hood1″.

VI. Clinton Hood1″.
VII. Mary- Hood1″.
II. Christian Heslep”, b. 1837, Alabama; d. 1890, St. Louis.
Mo.

III. Lewis Buckner Heslep”, b. June 22, 1838, Alabama; d. June 1, 1905, St. Louis. Mo. Married (Nov. 22, 1860) Griselda A. Seat, in Trenton, Tenn., a daughter of Capt. Pobert Seat, and his wife, Martha Gilchrist. Martha Gilchrist was a daughter of Dr. Allen Gilchrist, whose father, Thomas Gilchrist, married Martha Jones, sister of Gen. Willie Jones and Gov. Allen Jones, of Revolutionary fame, in North Carolina. Dr. Allen Gilchrist’s sister, Griselda Gilchrist, married Col. William Polk, of Tennessee, who was the father of Gen. Leonidas Polk, of Civil War fame.

IV. Joseph Heslep”, b. May 1, 1842, Florence, Ala.

V. Clinton Heslep”, b. Sept. 11, 1843, at Brown’s Port.
Perry Co., Tenn.; d. in Florence, after Civil War.

IX. Lewis Buckner Heslep” and Griselda A. Seat, his wife, had issue:

I. Cornelia Sallie Heslep1″, b. March 1, 1862, Trenton,
Tenn. Married (Sept. 22, 1880, St. Louis. Mo.)

Robert G. Hogan, b. in England and nephew of Hon. John Hogan, of St. Louis, who represented that city in Congress, and was known by the sobriquet of “Honest John.” II. Vernon Benton Heslep1″, b. April 15, 1864, in Columbus. Ky.

III. Lewis Buekner Heslep1″, b. Feb. 4. 1867, Trenton. Tenn.

X. Cornelia S. Heslep1″ married Robert G. Hogan, and had issue:

L Reginald R. Hogan11, lieutenant in United States Marine
Corps, b. Dec. 21, 1881, St. Louis, Mo.
II. Hazel Heslep Hogan11, b. June 28, 1883, St. Louis.
Married (April 5, 1903, in St. Louis) Ephraim Brevard Cockrell, son of former United States Senator
Francis Marion Cockrell.

III. Robert Cecil Hogan11. b. July 26, 1S85, St. Louis.

IV. Gladys Griselda Hogan11, b. March 7, 1889, St. Louis.
V. George Vernon Hogan11. b. March 10, 1895, in Webster

Grove, St. Louis Co., Mo.

HON. THOMAS LEWIS.

Thomas Lewis2, the second son of the founder, was born in Donegal, Ireland, April 27, 1718; died January 31, 1790. He was a man of strong and cultivated mind, of spirit and enterprise, and during the colonial period and the Revolutionary War rendered important services to the country. In 1746 he was appointed colonial surveyor of Augusta, and much of Washington’s great wealth was acquired by surveys of land under his authority and in common with him. He and Col. John Wilson represented the county in the House of Burgesses almost uninterruptedly from 1745 to 1767, and they voted in 1765 for Patrick Henry’s celebrated resolutions declaring that “this general assembly have the only exclusive right and power to lay taxes and impositions u;:on the inhabitants of this colony; that any efforts in an opposite direction are illegal, unconstitutional and unjust, and have a manifest tendency to destroy British as well as American freedom.”

In 1775 he was unanimously elected delegate to the Colonial Congress, and was one of the first to enroll his name among the “Sons of Liberty.” He was commissioner of the old confederacy of the thirteen colonies in 1778, to treat with the Indian tribes at the battle of Point Pleasant. He was a member of the convention which ratified the constitution of the United States.

After the Revolution, Gen. Washington made him a visit at Lewiston, in Rockingham, and there arranged their land claims. His descendants still own and reside upon his estate, Lewiston, near Port Republic, in the present county of Rockingham. He had a literary taste, and when not engaged in business was generally to be found in his library. He died at his residence in Rockingham County, on the Shenandoah River, three miles from Port Republic, January 31, 1790. In his will he fixed the place on his own estate where he wished to be buried, and desired that the burial service might be read from the Book of Common Prayer by his friend Peachy Gilmer. Married (January 26, 1749) Jane. the daughter of William Strother, Esq., of Stafford Co., Va., whose estate, opposite to Fredericksburg, joined the residence of the father of Gen. Washington, with whom (Gen. W.) she was a schoolmate and nearly of the same age.

Hon. Thomas Lewis2 and Jane Strother, his wife, had issue:

14. XII. Sophia Lewis3, b. 1775. Married John Carthrae, of Rockingham Co., Va.; removed to Missouri. Issue unknown.

15. XIII. William Benjamin Lewis2, b. 1778. Married Miss Hite, and at’ his death, 1842, left issue:

16. I. William H. Lewis4. Married Elizabeth, daughter of Capt. John Lewis, of Bath Co. Issue unknown.

17. II. Gen. George Lewis4. Married Miss Effinger.

18. III. Mary Jane Lewis4.

III. Margaret Ann Lewis3 (Thomas2, John1), b. 1751. Married MeClenahan. of Staunton, Va., by whom she left one child:

19. I. John MeClenahan4.

Her husband dying, she afterwards married Col. Wm. Bowyer, of Staunton, by whom at her death, in 1834, she left issue:

20. II. William C. Bowyer4.

21. III. Strother Bowyer4.

22. IV. Luke Bowyer4.

23. V. Peter C. Bowyer4.

24. VI. Matilda Bowyer4.

III. Agatha Lewis3 (Thomas-, John1), daughter of Col. Thomas Lewis and Jane Strother, his wife, b. 1753; d. 1836, aged 83. Married, first, Capt. Frogg, d. leaving one daughter; she left one daughter.

Agatha Lewis married, second, Col. John Stuart, of Greenbrier Co., Va., by whom she left issue:

25. 1. Elizabeth Frogg4, b. 1773. Issue by second marriage:

26. II. Charles A. Stuart4, b. 1775.

27. III. Lewis Stuart4, b. 1777.

28. IV. Margaret Stuart4, b. 1779.

29. V. Jane Stuart4, b. 17—.

I shall complete the Stuart lineage before taking up Charles Lewis’s branch:

IV. Elizabeth Frogg4 (Agatha3, Thomas-, John1), daughter of Agatha Lewis and Capt. Frogg. .Married Major Isaac Estill, of Monroe Co. and left issue.
30. I. Wallace Estill’.

31. II. John Estill”.

32. III. Estill”.

33. IV. Agnes Estill”.

IV.- Charles A. Stuart4 (Agatha Lewis2, Thomas2, John1), son of Agatha Lewis and John Stuart, of Greenbrier Co., Va. Married Miss Robertson, of Augusta Co., Va., and had following issue:

34. I. Robertson Stuart5. Married Miss Bradford, of Orange, Va.

35. II. James Stuart”. Married Margaret Lewis. Issue unknown.

36. III. Elizabeth Stuart5, single.

IV. Lewis Stuart4 (Agatha Lewis2, Thomas2, John1), son of Agatha Lewis and Col. John Stuart, b. 1777. Married Sarah Lewis and had issue:

37. 1. Rachael Stuart”. Married Gen. Davis, Mississippi.

38. II. Jane Stuart5. Married Samuel Price.

39. III. Agnes Stuart”. Married Charles L. Peyton.

40. IV. Charley Stuart5, unmarried.

41. V. Margaret Stuart”. Married James Davis.

42. VI. Lewis Stuart5, unmarried.

43. VII. Henry Stuart5, unmarried.

44. VIII. Andrew Stuart5, unmarried.

[V. Margaret Stuart4 (Agatha Lewis2, Thomas2, John1), daughter of Agatha Lewis and Col. John Stuart, b. 1779. Married Col. Andrew Lewis,* of Point Pleasant, 1802; he d. 1833, leaving issue:

45. I. Agnes Lewis5, b. 1805.

46. II. John Lewis5, b. 1807 ; d. 1811.

47. III. Elizabeth Lewis5, b. ;d. 1812.

48. IV. Mary J. Lewis5, b. 1811. Married Charles R. Baldwin in 1833; d. 1835.

49. V. John Stuart Lewis”.

50. VI. Margaret Lewis5, b ;d. 1819.

*note.—Col. Andrew Lewis3 (Charles3, John1) was son of Col. Charles Lewis and Sarah Murray.

51. VII. Sarah Frances Lewis5, b. 1817. Married Dr. Creigh.

of Lewisburg, W. Va. Issue unknown.

52. VIII. Elizabeth Lewis5, b. 1819.

53. IX. Andrew Lewis5, el. young.

IV. Jane Stuart4 (Agatha Lewis2, Thomas2, John1), daughter of Agatha Lewis and Col. John Stuart, b. 17—. Married Major Robert Crockett, of Wythe Co., W. Va., and left the following

Maria Crockett5. Married Judge James E. Brown.
Agatha Crockett”. Married James McGavoc, and
left issue.

Charles Crockett”. Married Mary Bowyer, of Botetourt and left issue.
Stuart Crockett”. Married Margaret Taylor, of Smyth Co., and left issue.

Frank Crockett”. Married .

Gustavus Crockett”. Married Eliza Erskine.
Augustine Crockett3, d. unmarried.

V. Agatha Estill5 (Elizabeth4, Agatha Lewis2, Thomas2, John1), daughter of Elizabeth Frogg and Major Isaac Estill. Married Henry Erskine of Greenbrier and had issue:

Elizabeth Erskine8. Married Gustavus Crockett.
Margaret Lewis Erskine”. Married Charles S. Gay, of Richmond, Va., who removed to Augusta Co.,
Va., and had issue:
Charles Gay7, killed in battle Malvern Hill.
Fanny Gay7. Married Richard M. Catlett, a lawyer of Staunton, Va.
Elizabeth Gay7.
Erskine Gay7, unmarried.
Agatha Gay7.
William Gay7.

Carrie Gay7. Married W. M. Allen, of Staunton, Va.
Margaret Gay7, d. young.
William Lewis Gay7, d. young.
John Robertson Gay7, d. young.

Jane Erskine8. Married William Boyd, a lawyer of Buchanan, in Botetourt Co., Va., and had issue

“4. I. Henry Boyd7.

75. II. Alice Boys Boyd7.

76. III. William Boyd7.

77. IV. Andrew Boyd7.

V. Rachel Stuart5 (Lewis4, Agatha Lewis3. Thomas2, John1), daughter of Lewis Stuart and Sarah Lewis, his wife. Married Gen. Davis, of Mississippi, and had issue:

78. I. Runnels Davis5.

79. II. Charles Davis5.

80. III. Sarah Davis”.

81. IV. Mary Davis”.

82. V. Alfred Davis”.

83. VI. Davis”.

84. VII. Davis”.

V. Jane Stuart5 (Lewis4, Agatha Lewie3, Thomas2, John1), daughter of Lewis Stuart and Sarah Lewis, his wife. Married Samuel Price, of Lewisburg, W. Va., formerly Lieutenant-Governor of Virginia and in 1876 United States Senator for West Virginia, and at her death, in 187:I. left issue:

85. I. Margaret Price”.

86. II. Mary Price”.

87. III. John Price”.

88. IV. Sally Price”.

89. V. Jennie Price”.

90. VI. Lewis Price”.

V. Agnes Stuart5 (Lewis4, Agatha Lewis2, Thomas2, John1), daughter of Lewis Stuart and Sarah Lewis, his wife. Married Charles L. Peyton, son of C. Peyton and a great nephew of President Jefferson, of Greenbrier Co., W. Va., and had issue:

91. I. Thomas Peyton”.

92. II. Elizabeth Peyton”.

93. III. Lewis Peyton”.

94. IV. Charles Peyton”.

95. V. Harry Peyton”.

96. VI. Caroline Peyton”.

V. Maria Crockett” (Jane Stuart4. Agatha Lewis2, Thomas2, John1), daughter of Jane Stuart and Major Robert Crockett, of Wythe Co., Va. Married Judge James E. Brown, by whom she had issue:

97. I. William Brown”, d. unmarried.

98. II. Jane Brown”, d. unmarried.

99. III. Fanny Peyton Brown”. Married Col. Joseph F.

Kent. She d. 1861, leaving issue: I. Betty Kent7. Married George M. Harrison.

II. John Kent7, unmarried.

III. Jane Kent7. Married Howe Peyton Cochran.

IV. Emma Kent7. Married Jno. 0. Yates.
V. Alexander Kent7, d. unmarried.

After the death (1861) of Mrs. Kent, Col. Joseph F. Kent
married, second, Virginia Frances Peyton, b. 1841. Issue:
I. Joseph Kent7.
II. Susan Peyton Kent7.

III. Mary Preston Kent7.

II. Susan Peyton Kent7. Married (6th of January, 1904) by Rev. Mercer P. Logan, D. D., at St. John’s Episcopal Church, Wytheville, Va., to Mr. Edmund Fontaine Broun, of Charleston, W. Va.*

IV. Alexander Brown, fourth child of Judge Brown, was a most promising young man, who, after graduating with distinction at the University of Virginia, commenced the law practice in Wythe, hut died soon after.

The Baltimore Sun of August 13, 1905, has the following article on:

THE OLD HOME OF NELLY CUSTIS.

Of the many old Colonial Homes in Virginia which are still in a splendid state of preservation, perhaps none can claim greater historical interest or more pleasing associations than does old Woodlawn Mansion, the

‘Being in Wytheville that winter I (L. Pecquet du Bellet) was at the wedding. I was at the reception and handed all the telegrams of congratulations to the bride and groom. A lovelier bride I have never seen. The parlors were crowded with guests from various States of the Union. The presents were very handsome, costing several thousand dollars.

The mother of the bride is a very dear friend of mine. I receive some very interesting letters from her. (Peyton Family, Hayden’s Virginia Genealogies, pp. 461-566.)

original home of Mrs. Eleanor Custis Lewis, nee Nelly Custis, the adopted daughter of General George Washington. Since Woodlawn was built one hundred years have rolled into the great abyss of the past, yet it stands to day a complete and solid result of fine old-time architecture, in no respect reduced from its ancient splendor or magnificence.

Woodlawn is located in lower Fairfax County, lying directly on the road known as the Alexandria pike, and an hour’s drive from that old city of Alexandria, where centers so much of history, sentiment and anecdote concerning America’s greatest general, the illustrious Washington. The commanding site upon which this mansion is built was formerly a part of the Mount Vernon estate, but, with the acres surrounding it. was given by General Washington to his adopted daughter, Nelly Custis, upon her marriage to his favorite nephew, Lawrence. Lewis, afterwards Major Lewis of Woodlawn. Its architecture is of Colonial date, being one of the finest specimens of that period and better known as the Georgian architecture. Within the long drawing-room of that historic mansion, on the last anniversary of the birthday of her devoted foster-father. Nelly was made the bride of Lawrence Lewis, Washington himself giving the blushing young beauty away to the beloved nephew, afterwards Major Lewis, of Woodlawn. This event took place on the 22nd of February. 1799. Mrs. Eleanor Custis Lewis sleeps to-day beneath the marble shaft that marks her grave at Mount Vernon, only a few feet away from the tomb containing the honored dust of her beloved hero and foster-father. Upon this monument the noble traits of this gentlewoman are thus written:

“Sacred to the memory of Eleanor Parke Custis. granddaughter of Mrs. Washington and adopted daughter of General Washington. Reared under the roof of the Father of His Country, this lady was not more remarkable for her beauty of person than for the superiority of her mind. She lived to be admired and died to be regretted, July 15. 1852, in the seventyfourth year of her age.”

Woodlawn has changed owners many times, and is the property to-day of Mr. Paul Kester, the popular young playwright.

Since writing the above I am the happy recipient of the following extract from Mrs. Penrose N. Ions, of San Angelo, Texas, taken from the “History of Huguenots,” by Samuel Smiles:

Jean Louis was forced to flee from France, during the persecutions of the Huguenots, which followed the revocation of the “Edict of Nantes.” He came of a Protestant family of wealth, position and influence, of the town of Castred. He made good his escape to England, and as the English were in need of experienced officers in Flanders, he was gladly weleomed and given a commission as Captain in Queen Anne’s Army in the “Low Countries.” For his gallantry and valuable services he was made Field Marshal, Earl of Ligenter and Baron of Greniskilin.

He was with Marlborough in Flanders, and attracted his attention at the storming of Liege. At Blenheim he was the only captain of hisregiment who survived. At Kenice (or Menice) he led the grenadiers in storming the counters. He fought at Malplaquet. where he was made Major of Brigade. He was in all of Marlborough’s battles, and at Dettingen as Lieutenant-General, he won still higher distinction. The intrepidity with which he led the British Infantry won the battle of Fontenoy. Placed in command of the British forces in Flanders, he was taken prisoner at the engagement of Sanfield. Restored to England he was made Commander-in-Chief, and Colonel of the Fort Guards. During his career, he was in nineteen battles and twenty-three sieges.

GENERAL JOHN LEWIS.

The first General John Lewis had a son- named :he was the eldest and died early. He had rented in fee simple, for a hundred years, the estate of Lord Dunraven, in Ireland. John Lewis, the eldest son of the dead man, succeeded to the titles and estates and settled in Ireland. That John Lewis went to Scotland and married Margaret, the daughter of Lord Lynn, who lived on Loch (Lake) Lynn.

John Lewis, then an earl, and his wife lived happily for a few years. Then the profligate Earl of Dunraven wanted to give (rent) the estate to a boon companion. He came with an armed hand to drive John Lewis away. He fired into the house and killed a brother of Lewis, who was ill in bed. John Lewis, who had been absent, returned, and, seeing the armed Earl, he shot him dead. English soldiers were sent to arrest John Lewis for killing the Earl of Dunraven, but the Irish of the whole country arose and helped him to escape to the west coast. All the landlords near John Lew-is armed their followers and escorted him to the coast, and he escaped to France. Feeling unsafe in France, he made his way alone and on foot over to the mountains in Spain. Relatives knelt to King George and begged a pardon for John Lewis. As he was safe in Spain and the King could not get him, he thought to make good use of him and try to get the Indians to kill him, so he (the King) said John Lewis should lose titles and property, but if he would go to Virginia, and go far beyond all of his good subjects, he (the King) would forgive and rent him a tract of land, 100,000 acres, provided he built a fort and became a shield to all of his good and loyal subjects. So, as he could not help himself, John Lewis came to Virginia. His brother brought over the family of John Lewis and a shipload of tenants—MeHughs (now called MeCuea) and McLungs and many other Valley families, all Presbyterians. As soon as they got to Virginia they were on a level with John Lewis.

John Lewis had the following children: Samuel, Thomas, Andrew, William, Margaret Anne, Charles and Alice. Alice married Mr. Madison and was the mother of Bishop Madison. Mr. Madison was the first and only member of the family to belong to the Protestant Episcopal Church.

Thomas Lewis married Jane Strother. His sketch has been given above.

II. Col. Charles Lewie2 (John1), the youngest son of the founder, John Lewis, and Margaret Lynn, his wife; was killed October 10, 1774, at the battle of Point Pleasant. Married Sarah Murray, an English lady, half-sister of Col. Cameron, of Bath Co., Va. She was a near relative of Linlev Murray, who wrote the grammar.

Col. Charles Lewis left following issue:

3. L Elizabeth Lewis2, b. 1762 : d. single.

4. II. Margaret Lewis2, b. 1765.

5. III. John Lewis2, b. 1766.

6. IV. Marv Lewis2, b. 1768.

7. V. Thomas Lewis2, b. 1771.

8. VI. Andrew Lewis2, b. 1772.

9. VII. Charles Lewis2, b. 1774.

III. Col. John Lewis3 (Charles2, John1), son of Col. Charles Lewis and Sarah Murray, his wife, of Bath Co., Va. Married Rachel Miller, of Augusta Co., and left at his death, 1843. the following issue:

16. VII. John Lewis4. Married Mary J.’Lewie, daughter of

William Benjamin Lewis, of Rockingham Co., Va., and Miss Hite. W. B. Lewis’ was youngest son of Thomas Lewis2 and Jane Strother. Issue unknown.

17. VIII. Elizabeth Lewis4. Married Wm. H. Lewis, son of

Wm. Benjamin Lewis and M. Hite. Issue unknown.

18. IX. Hannah Lewis4, unmarried.

19. X. Rachel Lewis4, d. unmarried.

III. Charles Lewis3 (Thomas3. John1), son of Thomas Lewis2 and Jane Strother, his wife; b. 1772; d. 1832, near Port Republic. Rockingham Co., Va. Married Anne Hance. of the Eastern Shore of Maryland. PTe inherited the homestead on the Shenandoah River in what is now Rockingham Co., Va. Charles Lewis and Anne Hance had issue:

I. Thomas Lewis4. Married Delia Fletcher. Issue:
I. Anne Lewis”.
IF. Samuel Hance Lewis4.

III. Charles Chambers Lewis4. Married Mary Allen and had
following issue:
I. Charles Chambers Lewis”.
II. James Lewis”.

III. Andrew Lewis”.

IV. Mary Lewis”.

V. Henry Clay Lewis”. VI. William Lewis”. VII. George Kemper Lewis”. IV. Mary Lewis4. Married Dr. Nusco Chambers, of Clinton Co., Ohio.

V. Margaret Strother Lewis4. Married Rev. C. B. Tippett, of Maryland.

IV. Gen. Samuel Hance Lewis4 (Charles2, Thomas2, John1), son of Charles Lewis3 and Anne Hance, a prominent citizen of Virginia, was a graduate of Washington College (now Washington and Lee), a man of great literary tastes, profoundly religious, of high moral worth, and beloved friend of Bishops Meade and Cobb. While exceedingly genial among his intimate friends, he was a man remarkable for his strict religious observances, for his stern deportment in the presence of frivolity, and for his iron will and high integrity, both in private as well as in public life. He represented his county in the Legislature for many years, and his name is dear to the church in Virginia, in whose councils he was so long a ruling spirit. He died at his home, Lewiston, Rockingham Co., of cancer of the neck, in 1868.

He married, first, Nancy Lewis, the granddaughter of Col. Charles Lewis, killed at the battle of Point Pleasant; second. Anna Maria Lomax, daughter of Judge J. T. Lomax, of Fredericksburg, Va.; third, Mrs. Fry. No issue by this marriage.

Issue by first marriage:

I. Charles H. Lewis”, United States Minister to Portugal. 1873. Married a daughter of Judge Lomax and had issue of one daughter. TI. John Francis Lewis”.

III. Samuel H. Lewis5. Married a Miss Dabney.

IV. Elizabeth Lewis5. Married Rev. J. C. Wheat.
V. Mary Lewis5, d. unmarried.

VI. Anne Lewis5, d. unmarried.
VII. Margaret Lynn Lewis5, d. unmarried.
VIII. William Meade Lewis5, d. unmarried.
Issue by second marriage:

IX. Charlotte Lewis5. Married Beverly Botts and has issue.

X. Lunsford Lomax Lewis5.
XL Cornelia Lewis5, d. unmarried.
XII. Anne Maria Lewis5, d. unmarried.

V. John Francis Lewis5 (Samuel4, Charles’, Thomas2, John1), second son of Gen. Samuel Hance Lewis and Nancy Lewis, his first wife. He inherited all of his father’s sterling qualities, and was one of the leading men of his day in Virginia. Of magnificent physical proportions—six feet three inches tall—his mental attributes were quite as remarkable. He was especially noted for his reckless bravery, his impulsive denunciation of wrong, and his utter disregard for public opinion when he considered it to be in error. His first appearance in public life was when he was sent as delegate to the convention at the outbreak of the Civil War, which was to decide whether Virginia would secede from the Union or not. He was a strong Union man and went there instructed to vote against secession, which he did to the bitter end, saying they might hang him, as they threatened to do. but he would never sign the ordinance. He was the only man in this convention who did not sign it. There were several of the West Virginia members, who did not sign, but they left at once for their homes within the Northern line. A hundred times the ordinance was thrust into his face, but he invariably replied, “I will die first.” That he was not killed seems almost a miracle. Many of the best and staunchest Union men gave way to the pressure and signed the ordinance. Samuel McDowel More was burned in effigy, Jubal A. Early was threatened with mob law, yet they both yielded to the overwhelming excitement. John F. Lewis alone remained at his post, true to the last to his firm conviction that to do so would bring trouble and ruin to his State. His integrity and honesty of purpose were so well known and so well appreciated that they seemed to be a shield to his open and often reckless Union utterances, and while others were imprisoned, or shot down on the roadside, he was spared to save his State from the internal strife which so long retarded the happiness and prosperity of many of the more southern states. In 1869 he was elected Lieutenant Governor, and in November of that year was elected to the United States Senate. To quote from Rev. 0. S. Bunting, late of Petersburg, Va., and a dear friend: “From heel to crown he was every inch a man—brave, true, sincere, courteous in the truest sense, generous, positive. Agree with him some did not, but admire him all must. All over the State he was honoured as extremely few public men ever were.” He was born 1818. Married (October 26. 1842) Serena Helen Sheffey. b. 1823, daughter of the Hon. Daniel Sheffey, of Staunton. Va. They had issue:

I. Daniel Sheffey Lewis”, b. Oct. 17, 1843. Married Isabella Botts, daughter of Hon. John Minor Botts, of Richmond, Va. Issue:
I. Minor Botts Lewis7.
II. John F. Lewis7.
III. Daniel Sheffey Lewis7.
IV. Beverley Lewis7.

V. Lunsford Lewis7.
VI. Archie Lewis7.
II. Nannie Lewis”, b. 1845. Married Hon. John Ambler Smith, of Dinwiddie Co., Va. Their descendants are in Volume I, Chapters VI and VII.

III. Maria Hanson Lewis5, b. 1848. Married Penrose N. Ions,

of Fairfax, Va. No issue. Mr. Ions, agent Insurance Co., Hartford, Conn. They reside San Angelo. Texas.

IV. Serena Helen Lewis5, b. 1850. Married Lewis Stuart Davis, of Greenbrier. W. Va. No issue.

V. Mary Louise Lewis5, b. Sept. 16, 1857. Married Dr. Edwin Gibbs, of Lexington, Va. Issue:
I. John Lewis Gibbs7.
II. Nannie Lewis Gibbs7.

VI. John Francis Lewis”, b. Sept. 6, 1860. Married (Jan. 10,
1883) Anna Harnsberger, b. Dec. 1, 1861. They reside at Lynwood, Va., and have issue:
I. Helen Lewis7, b. Sept, 8, 1888.

II. Hanson Lewis7, b. May 11, 1893.

III. Anna Lewis7, b. May 4, 1896.

IV. Katherine Stuart Lewis7, b. April 26, 1898.

VII. Samuel Hance Lewis5, b. March 9, 1869. Married Editha Clay, of Lynchburg, ATa. Issue: 1. Samuel Hance Lewis7.

Daniel Sheffey Lewis5, oldest son of the late Hon. John F. Lewis5 and Serena Helen Sheffey, his wife, b. October 17, 1843, graduated from the Law Department of the University of Virginia in the year 1867. Married Isabella McLaine, youngest daughter of the late Hon. John Minor Botts. In 1876 he was the Republican candidate for Congress in the Fifth Congressional District of Virginia and was defeated by the Hon. George G. Cabell, of Danville, Va. In 1882 was appointed by President Arthur United States District Attorney for the Western District of Virginia, which place Mr. Lewis held until President Cleveland came into office, when he was removed to make way for the Hon. H. C. Allen, of Woodstock.

In 1886 he bought the Spirit of the VcUley, a newspaper published in Harrisonburg, Va., which he has published up to the present date (1906). For sixteen years he held the position of treasurer of the town of Harrisonburg and was reelected on June 14, 1904.

V. Samuel Hance Lewis5 (Samuel4. Charles8, Thomas3. John1), third son of Gen. Samuel Hance Lewis and Nancy Lewis. his first wife. Married Louisa Dabney. Issue:

I. Lucy Lewis”.
IL. Sal lie Lewis”.

III. Elizabeth Lewis”.

IV. Ellen Lewis”.

V. Samuel Hance Lewis”. Married (Dee. 1900) Agnes

de Leon Moses. Issue: I. Margaret Lynn Lewis7.

VI. John E. Walter Lewis”.
VII. Charles Lewis5.

VIII. Harry Lewis”.
IX. Sue Lewis”.

V. Elizabeth Rachel Lewis5 (Samuel4, Charles2, Thomas2, John1), duaghter of Gen. Samuel Hance Lewis and Nancy Lewis, his first wife. Married Rev. James Clinton Wheat. They have issue:

[. Dr. Samuel Lewis Wheat5, d. Dec., 1903. Married (1886)

Ella Rutherford. She came from Scotland. Issue: I. Elizabeth Lewis Wheat7, b. Oct, 27, 1887. I [. James Clinton Wheat7, b. Feb., 1888.

III. Frances Rutherford Wheat7, b. , 1889.

II. John Wheat”.

III. Eleanor C. Wheat5. She lives at the old home of Gen.

Samuel Hance Lewis, Lynwood, Rockingham Co., Va.

IV. James Clinton Wheat5. Married (June, 1895) Gertrude

Ross, daughter of J. M. Ross, of U. S. A. Issue:
I. Clarence Ross Wheat7. Mr. Wheat resides in Atlanta,
Ga.

Issue by second marriage, Anna Maria Lomax:
V. Charlotte Thornton Lewis”, daughter of Gen. Samuel H.
Lewis. Mamed Beverley B. Botts, son of Hon. John
Minor Botts.

VI. Lunsford Lomax Lewis5.

VII. Cornelia J. Lewis”, b. 1847; d. 1871.
VIII. Anna Maria Lewis5. Married Charles Maurice Smith,
of Richmond. Va. (Descendants Volume I, Chapters
VI and VII.)

V. Charlotte Thornton Lewis5 (Samuel4, Charles2, Thomas2, John1), daughter of Gen. Samuel H. Lewis and Anna Maria Lomax, his second wife. Married Beverley B. Botts, son of Hon. John Minor Botts. They have issue: I. Anna Lewis Botts”. II. Mary Beverley Botts”, b. Nov. 7, 1869, Culpeper Co., Va. Married (June 28, 1899, in Washington, D. C.) John Minor Botts Hoxey, b. April 17, 1869, Paterson, New Jersey. Issue: I. John Minor Botts Hoxey7, Jr., b. April 25, 1900, Brooklyn, N. Y.

II. Dorothea Douglas Hoxey, b. Jan. 26, 1903, Brooklyn, N. Y.; d. Feb. 6, 1903. V. Judge Lunsford Lewis5 (Samuel4, Charles3, Thomas2, John1) , son of Gen. Samuel Hance Lewis and Anna Maria Lomax, his second wife; he was Republican nominee for Governor of Virginia during the fall of 1905. Married, first, Rose Botts. daughter of John Minor Botts; second, Miss Jane Looney, of Memphis, Tenn.

I met Mrs. Lewis in Richmond, Va., June, 1904. To her kind and gracious invitation I am indebted for spending a delightful evening at the Woman’s Club. I had the pleasure of meeting Mrs. Stonewall Jackson the same evening. I met Mrs. Lewis several times during my visit in Richmond, and she was always as courteous as any lady I had the pleasure of meeting at the Capital City of the Old Dominion.

At the Woman’s Club I was introduced to Mrs. Willford. She pressed my hands and remarked: “You must be the daughter of Catherine Ambler Moncure. 1 visited her during my wedding tour in Paris, France, and remember seeing you as a child.”

Judge Lunsford Lomax Lewis and Rose Botts, his first wife, have issue:

I. Minor Lewis”. II. Mary Willer Lewis”. I have had some very interesting letters from Miss Lewis. III. Samuel Hance Lewis”.