Fauntleroy of Virginia Family History

Fauntleroy Family

Fauntleroy Family

Fauntleroy coat-of-arms is described: From Virginia, Prominent Families, Vol. 1-4

On a wreath of the same colour, a fieur-de-lis ar, between two angels’ wings, displayed azure. Shields three infants’ heads coupled, argent, cringed or.
Motto: “Enfant du sor.”
The first known of the name of Fauntleroy was living in Dorset, England, in 1721. An undying tradition ascribes the paternity of the family to John, King of Frances, who was a captive at Windsor Castle, from 1356 to 1364, by a morganatic marriage with Catherine Grandeson, Countess of Salisbury, a member of the Courtenay family.
The first from whom an unbroken line was traced was John Fauntleroy, who married Joanna Whalley, of Purbick. Issue:
I. John Fauntleroy((2)). Married Elizabeth Wadham.
II. William Fauntleroy((2)), D. D., of Oxford.
III. Elizabeth Fauntleroy((2)), Abbess of Almsbury.
IV. Agnes Fauntleroy((2)). Married Lord Stourton.
V. Tristam Fauntleroy((2)). Married Joan, daughter of William, second Lord Stourton. His will was dated 1639. By the marriage of Tustam Fauntleroy and Joan Stourton, the family descends from the titled families of Stourton and Berkeley, as follows:
Robert Fitz Hardinge received Berkeley Castle by forfeiture, 1170, from Roger de Berkeley. Issue:
Maurice Hardinge, b. 1120, married Alice Berkeley, the daughter of the vested owner. He had Thomas of Berkeley, of Berkeley Castle, married Joan Saumasey, d. 1243. Issue.
Maurice Berkeley married Isabelle Crown, daughter of an English baron and his wife, Isabel de Valence (or Valem), half maternal sister to Henry the Third, by the second marriage of his mother, Isabelle, with William de Lusignan, ninth count de la Marche.
Miss Strickland traces her lineage through the Courtenay family to Louis le Gros. He had issue:
I. Thomas Berkeley, first Lord, who married, 1264, Joan Ferras, daughter of William de Ferras, Earl of Derby. Their daughter, Alice, married Ralph de Stourton, in 1300. Issue:
I. William de Stourton. Married Joan, daughter of Sir William Vernon.
II. John Stourton. Married a daughter of Lord Bassett.
III. William Stourton. Married Elizabeth Moigne, in 1402, daughter of Sir John Moigne. (Sir John was created baron, 1448; married Margarite, daughter of Sir John Wadham.)
IV. William Stourton. Married Margaret Chiddock, daughter of Sir John Chiddock.
V. Joan Stourton. Married Tristam Fauntleroy, in 1539. Issue:
I. John Fauntleroy, of Crondall, d. 1598. Married -.
II. William Fauntleroy, d. 1625. Married Frances -.
III. John Fauntleroy. Married Ph£be Wilkinson, in 1609.
Moore Fauntleroy Pedigree

Moore Fauntleroy Pedigree

IV. Moore Fauntleroy, came to Virginia in 1642, built Maylor’s Hold, Richmond Co., Va.; member of the House of Burgesses in 1644 to 1659; married Mary Hill. From this marriage, all of the name in Virginia descended. He sponsored a great number of early immigrants to America, his land holdings were very large. In the early days of the Colonies the British Crown awarded land grants for sponsoring immigrants.  They have intermarried with the Turners, of Kinlock, and Walsingham, the Beverleys, the Paynes of Warrenton, and some branches of the Carters (Carter Family, Chapter VII, Volume II). Landon Carter of Pittsylvania married Judith Fauntleroy.

Miss Betsey Fauntleroy, a granddaughter of Moore Fauntleroy, the emigrant, was one of the lady-loves of Gen’l George Washington. She did not smile on him, however, but married Dr. William Brockenbrough, of Tappahannock. She was grandmother of Judge William Brockenbrough, of the Court of Appeals, Richmond, Va. The house of President Jefferson Davis, during the Civil War, now the Confederate Museum, in Richmond, Va., was built and owned by him. (Volume I, Chapter VIII.)
Gen’l Thomas Turner Fauntleroy, another distinguished descendant of Moore Fauntleroy and Mary Hill; b. Richmond Co., Va., October 6, 1796; d. September 12, 1883. He was Colonel of the first Reg. U. S. Dragoons. As soon as Virginia seceded he promptly resigned, and offered himself to the Confederacy; he was made General. Of all the officers who resigned from the U. S. Army and came south, he held the highest rank. Married Ann Magdelin Magill, youngest child of Col. Charles Magill, and his second wife, Mary Buckner, née Thruston. Issue:
I. Charles Magill Fauntleroy, b. August 21, 1822; d. July 29, 1889.
II. Thomas Turner Fauntleroy.
III. Alfred Fauntleroy, d. in childhood.
IV. Mary Fauntleroy. Married Mr. Barnes.
V. Catherine Fauntleroy. Married Col. Whittlery.
VI. Archibald Magill Fauntleroy, b. July 8, 1836; d. 1886
I. Charles Magill Fauntleroy, b. 1822, entered U. S. Navy, but resigned in 1861, and entered the Confederate S. Army, and was appointed Inspector General, under Gen’l Joseph E. Johnston; married three times: first, Janet Knox of Leesburg, Loudoun Co., Va., in 1847; dying, she left one child:
I. Janet Fauntleroy. Married Powell Harrison, of Loudoun Co., Va.
Thomas Turner Fauntleroy, second son of Gen’l Fauntleroy and Mary Buckner Thruston, his wife, practiced law in Winchester, and was junior member of the law firm of Barton .& Williams. After the close of the Civil War, he was appointed Judge of the Va. Court of Appeals, which office he held for twelve years, during which time he lived in Richmond; later he removed with his family to St. Louis, where he now resides.
Judge Thomas T. Fauntleroy married, in Winchester, Va., in 1851, Ann Hite Williams, daughter of Philip Williams, a leading lawyer of the State, and Ann Maury, née Hite. One year later she died, leaving a babe of only a few weeks, called Philip Williams Fauntleroy, who was most affectionately raised by his stepmother, Williams. He first studied law, later for the Protestant Episcopal Ministry. He has had charge of a church in St. Louis for many years; married Miss Battle, and has several children.
Judge Thomas Turner Fauntleroy married, second, Elizabeth Smith Hite, daughter of Cornelius Baldwin Hite, Sr., of Belle Grove, and Augusta Elizabeth, née Smith, daughter of Col. Augustin Charles Smith, of Winchester, Va. Issue will be given elsewhere.
III. Mary Fauntleroy, eldest daughter of Gen’l Fauntleroy, and Ann Magdalen Magill, his wife; married Dr. Joseph Barnes, U. S. Army, Surgeon General, of Washington. Issue:
I. Joseph Barnes, Jr.
II. Anna Barnes.
IV. Katharine (called Kate) Fauntleroy, daughter of Gen’l Thomas T. Fauntleroy, married Major Whittlesey, U. S. A., for some years in charge of the “Soldier’s Home,” near Washington, D. C. Afterwards, was sent to a post in Washington Territory (now a State), where he died, leaving a widow and two sons. Mrs. Whittlesey has since died, her obituary appearing in a Winchester paper:
Winchester, Va., May 28, 1906.-A telegram was received here to-day from Seattle, Wash., announcing the death of Mrs. Katharine Whittlesey, widow of Major J. H. Whittlesey, of the United States Army, and member of an old and distinguished Virginia family, her father being General Thomas T. Fauntleroy, of this city. Two sons and one sister, Mrs. Barnes, of Washington, survive.
I. Charles Whittlesey. Married -, and lives in Tacoma, Washington.
II. William Whittlesey. Married -, and lives in Seattle, Washington.
V. Dr. Archibald Magill Fauntleroy, youngest son of Gen’l Thomas T. Fauntleroy, and Ann Magdalen, née Magill, resigned from the U. S. Army, and was appointed Medical Director and Surgeon on the staff of Gen’l Johnston; married Sally Conrad, the beautiful daughter of Robert L. Conrad, an eminent lawyer in Winchester, Va.; died leaving a widow and many children.
IV. Archibald Magill, son of Col. Charles Magill and Mary Buckner Thruston, his wife, married Mary Jane Page, of Bosewell, Gloucester Co., Va.; daughter of Mann Page, and Elizabeth Nelson, and granddaughter of Gov. Page and Gov. Nelson. Mr. and Mrs. Archibald Magill lived at “Barley Wood,” a few miles from Winchester, Va. No issue.
V. John Samuel Magill, son of Col. Charles Magill and Mary Buckner Thruston, married Mary Ann Glass. They lived at the “Meadows,” a handsome estate near Winchester. He was a lawyer, and represented Frederick Co., in the Legislature, several years. He had one child:
I. Mary Elizabeth Magill, d. in childhood.
VI. Alfred Thruston Magill, son of Col. Charles Magill and Mary Buckner Thruston, was Professor of Medicine in the University of Va.; at the time, his wife’s father, Judge Henry St. George Tucker, was Professor of Law there. Dr. Magill was not only distinguished in his profession, but honored and loved for his high character; d. June 12, 1837, aged 33 years. Married Ann Evelina Hunter Tucker, daughter of Judge Henry St. George Tucker, of the Court of Appeals of Va., brother of Judge Beverley Tucker, and half brother of John Randolph of Roanoke. Issue:
I. Fanny Bland Magill, b. December 17, 1828; d. May 13, 1901. Married Rev. James Robert Graham, October 3, 1853. He was in charge of the Presbyterian Church, in Winchester, which position he occupied until his death. He left one daughter, Evelina Tucker Magill, and five sons. Three of the latter are Presbyterian ministers, one a physician, and one a druggist, in St. Louis.
II. Mary Tucker Magill was a woman of culture, and wrote several books.
III. Evelina Magill. Married William Levin Powell, son of Mr. Humphrey Powell, of Loudoun Co., Va., and brother of Mrs. Randolph Tucker; she d. 1901, leaving one son:
I. Levin Powell, who graduated at the University of Va. in 1901.
IV. Virginia Magill. Married Maj. Edwards, C. S. Army. After the war, they settled in Atlanta, Ga. No issue.
VII. Henry Dangerfield Magill, son of Col. Charles Magill, and Mary Buckner Thruston, his wife, married Ann Elizabeth Mason, daughter of Temple Mason, of “Temple Hall,” Loudoun Co., Va. On May 15, 1847, Dr. Henry D. Magill was instantly killed by a fall from his horse, while on his round of professional duties. A friend wrote of him-“A noble and almost perfect specimen of a man, in mind, person and character, a successful and accomplished physician, descended on both sides from the best Revolutionary stock, but, above all, was his constant walk in the footsteps of Christ.” Bishop Meade, in his “Old Churches and Families,” speaks of the loveliness of Dr. Magill’s character. Issue:
I. Thomas Henry Magill. Married -, and lives in Louisiana.
II. Ann Magill. Married Mr. Sparrow, son of Dr. Sparrow, who for many years was Professor at the Episcopal Theological Seminary, near Alexandria, Va. She d. 1895, without issue. One of Mrs. Ann (Magill) Sparrow’s ancestors was Col. George Mason, member of Parliament, in the reign of Charles I, of England, and first of his family in America. (Mason Family, Volume II, Chapter XVII.)
VIII. Mary Buckner Thruston Magill, daughter of Charles Magill and Mary Buckner Thruston, his wife; b. 1810; d. 1890. She was a devoted church woman, lovely in character and possessed of voice of rare sweetness and power; married, 1831, Robert Lee Randolph, of “Eastern View,” son of Col. Robert Randolph and Elizabeth Carter, of Shirley. Issue elsewhere. (Randolph Family, Volume II, Chapter V.)
IX. Augustine Smith Magill, son of Col. Charles Magill and Mary Buckner Magill (Thruston), his wife; b. 1811. He was an A. M. of the University of Virginia; removed to St. Martinsville, La., and practiced law; married his cousin, Frances Weeks, of St. Martinsville, La. Issue:
I. David Weeks Magill.
II. Mary Ida Magill.
III. Augustine Magill.
IV. Buckner Magill, d. young.

Augustine Smith Magill d. 1852, and his widow married Dr. Pruett. In the summer of 1853, Dr. and Mrs. Pruett, with her two children, Ida and Augustine Magill, went to a much frequented bathing place on Lost Island, on the coast of Louisiana. During a terrific cyclone and tidal wave, the island was submerged, and Mrs. Pruett, the two children, and a brother of Dr. Pruett, were drowned. David Weeks Magill and Dr. John Augustine Smith expected to join the Pruett party, but were delayed by the storm. Their fate, some few weeks later, was equally tragic. Dr. Smith fell from a steamboat, which was approaching Morgan City, and was drowned; David Magill joined the C. S. Army, and died from fever contracted in the service.

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The Drake family of New England

Drake of Ashe

The Drake family of New England, descendants of the illustrious English family of that name, which had its seat at Ashe, Devonshire, England, are thus traced. From Ancestry of John Barber White and his descendants edited by Almira Larkin White

1. John Drake of Exmouth, England, 1360; m. Christian, dau. of John Billet; he acquired the estate of Ashe. His widow m. (2) Richard Francheney.

2. John Drake m. Christian, dau. of John Antage, and settled at Otterton, founded the Otterton family of Drake, through his son. He was unlawfully excluded from Ashe by his half brother, Christopher Francheyney (son of his mother by her second husband.)

3. John Drake inherited Otterton; m. a Cruwys of Cruwys Morchand.

4. John Drake of Otterton m. Agnes dau. of Killoway.

5. John Drake settled first at Exmouth, and by a suit-at-law recovered Ashe. He m. Margaret, dau. of John Cole of Rill.

6. John Drake inherited Ashe; m. Anne, dau. of Roger Greenville; his son Bernard inherited Ashe.

7. Robert Drake settled at Wiscomb, Parish of South Leigh, Devonshife.

8. William Drake of Wiscomb, County Devon.

9. John Drake, b. in Wiscomb, Devonshire, England, about 1580; m. in England, Elizabeth Rogers. He came to Boston, in the fleet with Winthrop, as he was admitted freeman, Oct. 19, 1630. He removed to Windsor, Conn., in 1635-6, where he was injured by being run over by his loaded team, Aug. 17, 1659. His widow d. Oct. 7, 1681, aged 99. Children:

1034. Jacob Drake 10 b. in England, came with his parents to New England in 1630; m. in Windsor, Apr. 12, 1649, Mary, dau. of John Bissell of Windsor. He d. Aug. 6, 1689.

1035. John Drake, 10+

1036. A daughter 10 into whose house the father was carried at the time of the accident that caused his death.

1037. Job Drake, 10 b. in England; m. in Windsor, June 25,

1646, Mary, dau. of Henry and Elizabeth (Saunders) Walcutt. He d. in Windsor, Sept. 6, 1692.

JOHN Drake 10 (1035), b. in England, came with his parents to Boston, New England, in 1630; settled in Windsor, Conn. He ma. Nov. 30, 1648, Hannah Moore 2 (1012); he was one of the first settlers of Simsbury, Conn. His inventory presented Sept. 12, 1689: Simsbury property £393.15s; Windsor, £225.2s; total 616.17s. Children:

1038. Job Drake, 11 b. in Windsor, June 15, 1651; m. Mar. 20, 1672, Elizabeth Alvord 5 (1103), b. in Windsor, Sept. 21, 1651.

1039. Hannah Drake, 11 b. Aug. 6, 1653.

1040. Enoch Drake, 11 b. Dec. 8, 1655; m. Nov. 11, 1680, Sarah Porter.

1041. Ruth Drake,”+

1042. Simon Drake, 11 b. Oct. 28, 1659.

1043. Lydia Drake, 11 b. Jan. 10, 1661.

1044. Elizabeth Drake, 11 b. July 22, 1664.

1045. Mary Drake, 11 b. Jan. 29, 1666.

1046. Mindwell Drake,” b. Nov. 10, 1671.

1047. Joseph Drake, 11 b. June 26, 1674.

RUTH Drake 11 (1041), b. in Windsor, Conn., Dec. 1, 1657; m. as (2) wife, Jan. 25, 1677, Samuel Barber’ (1005), b. in Windsor, Conn., bapt. Oct. 1, 1648; his will was proven April 4, 1709; hers proven Dec., 1731.

Ruth Drake 11 m. Samuel Barber 2.
Joseph Barber 3 m Mary Loomis 3
Daniel Barber 4 m. Naomi Barber 4.
Elizabeth Barber 5 m. Rev. Isaiah Butler, Jr. 5.
Rebekah Butler 3 m. Moses Barber 3.
Rebekah Barber 7 m. John White 10.
John Barber White 11 m. Arabell Bowen 11 and Emma Siggins 5.

Ashe House 1752 Devon England

Drake Island Mount Edgecombe

Drake Island Mount Edgecombe

Painting by Mitchell Plymouth Drake Island

Painting by Mitchell Plymouth Drake Island

History of the Drake’s of Ashe: From Genealogical and family history of the state of New Hampshire : a record of the achievements of her people in the making of a commonwealth and the founding of a nation (1908)
Soon after the conquest of Wessex by DRAKE the Saxons, a family or clan called
Draco or Drago appears to have taken possession of an old Roman and British encampment in what is now the Manor of Musbury, Axminster, Devon county, England, which subsequently became known as Mount Drake. From this family it is probable that all of the name in England and Ireland are descended, as, although the crests of the various families of Drake in later days varied, their arms were the same, thus proving the common origin of the family. That the family is of great antiquity is shown from the fact that before the Norman conquest, 1066, A. D., it was well established in Devon county. In Domes Day Book six places are mentioned as possessed by persons of the name. We are told that “Honiton”, one of them, was well known to the Romans, and was held by Drago, the Saxon, before the conquest. The name Drago or Draco, the Latin for Drake, was in use among the Romans, and signifies “one who draws or leads,” a “leader.” The Romans obtained the name from the Greeks, among whom it is found as early as 600, B. G, when Draco, the celebrated Athenian legislator, drew up the code of laws for the government of the people, which bore his name.

Ashe, an ancient seat adjoining Mount Drake, was brought into the Drake Family by the marriage, in 1420, of John Drake, of Mount Drake and Exmouth (the first from whom lineal descent can be traced), to Christiana, daughter and heiress of John Billett, of Ashe, and remained in the family about four hundred years. Of this family was Sir Francis Drake, the celebrated navigator; also Samuel Drake, D. D., of eminent literary attainments, who died in 1673, and whose equally eminent son of the same name edited Archibishop Parker’s works, etc.; also Francis Drake, M. D., surgeon of York and F. R. S., a great antiquarian, author of “The History and Antiquities of York;” and Doctor James Drake, F. R. I., whose discoveries in anatomy are not surpassed in importance by those of Hervey, John Drake, of the council of Plymouth, one of the original company established by King James in 1606 for settling New England, was of a branch of the family of Ashe, several of whose sons came to this country, including John who came to Boston in 1630, with two or more sons, and who finally settled in Windsor; and Robert, also two or more sons and one daughter, who settled in Hampton, New Hampshire. From these brothers are descended all of the name in New England, and most if not all of those bearing it in the middle, southern and western states. We, however, meet with some modern emigrants of the name, but they are not numerous. Robert Drake was among the first who, to avoid persecution fled to New England, driven hither from fear of a revival of Popery in a later reign. He was contemporary with Admiral Sir Francis Drake, Knight, and was born the same year that he returned from his great voyage around the world, and was fifteen years of age when that commander died.

(I) Robert Drake was born in the county of Devon, England, in 1580, the year of the great earthquake, came to New England with a family before 1643, and took up his residence at Exeter, New Hampshire, but removed from that place to Hampton, in the same state in the beginning of 1651. Here he owned and left a considerable estate. When he went to Exeter does not appear, but he may have been of the Rev. John Wheelwright’s company who settled there in 1638. His house, which he bought of Francis Peabody, stood on the same place now occupied by the Baptist meeting house in Hampton. He was a man of eminent piety, was one of the selectmen in 1654, and was highly respected. He was sixty-three years of age when he came to America, and was eightyeight at the time of his death, January 14, 1668. His will, in which he describes himself as “searge maker,” was made in 1663. Two items in the inventory taken January 23, 1667, show the difference in values then and now. One hundred acres of land of a second division westward was valued at eight pounds ($40); four iron wedges and a pair of beetle rings, ten shillings ($2.50). There is no mention of his wife, and it is not known whether she came to America or not. He had three children, Nathaniel, Susannah and Abraham.

(II) Abraham, second son and third and youngest child of Robert Drake, probably came to New England with his father. He was a prominent inhabitant of Exeter in 1643, and afterward in Hampton, whither he went, probably with his father. “His residence was at a place since called ‘Drake’s Side,’ because at was on the westerly side of a considerable swamp; and his estate has been handed down in the name to this day (1845), and in the name of Abraham, with a single exception, now over two hundred years,” says S. G. Drake, the historian of the family. How long before 1643 Abraham Drake was at Exeter has not been ascertained, but in a petition which with twenty others he signed and presented to the general court of Massachusetts, in’ that year, against the encroachments of the neighboring settlers, it is said, those people “know we long since purchased these lands, also quietly possessed them.” In the settlement of the Ox Common at Hampton in 1651 he had one share. In 1663 the town chose him to-lay out four thousand acres “west of Hampton bounds, and a way to Great Pond.” In 1665 he was appointed to lay out the second division, and in 1668 and 1669 he was chosen to run down the town lines. He was selectman in 1658, and perhaps other years, and in 1673 he had the appointment of Marshall of the county of Norfolk, in which office he probably continued until the separation of New Hampshire from Massachusetts, in 1679. He was a man capable of any business, a good penman, and forward in all public service. In a tax list of ad. 9 mo. 1653, of an amount of fifty-three pounds, two shillings, ten pence, his quota was ten shillings, two pence, the whole number of persons taxed being seventy-three. Abraham Drake, like his father, lived to a very advanced age, but the time of his death is not yet discovered. It appears from a pencil note in Mr. Toppans manuscript that he was living in 1712, at the age of eighty-four. His wife Jane died January 25, 1676. Abraham had by his wife Jane seven children: Susannah, Abraham, Sarah, Mary, Elizabeth, Hannah and Robert.

(III) Abraham (2), second child and eldest son of Abraham (1) and Jane Drake, born December 29, 1654, died in 1714, aged fifty-nine years, appears to have been one of the wealthiest men of Hampton, the inventory of his estate being nine hundred and twenty-six pounds, five shillings. He was a prominent man in the town, as his father before him had been, and was selectman in 1696-1703-07-08. His wife was Sarah, and they had five children: Sarah, Abraham, Jane, Mary and Nathaniel. (The last named receives mention, with descendants,, in this article).

(IV) Abraham (3), second child and eldest son of Abraham (2) and Sarah Drake, was born in December, 1688, and died April 13, 1767, aged seventy-eight. He married January 2, 1711, Theodate Roby. Her father, Judge Henry Ruby, who fills a conspicuous page in the early history of New Hampshire, was a descendant of Henry Roby, who was at Exeter in the beginning of its settlement, and one of the petitioners before noticed. Theodate (lied April 12, 1783, aged ninety-one years. The children of Abraham and Theodate were: Elizabeth, Theodate, Abraham, Samuel, Sarah, Mary, Abigail, John, Simon and Thomas. (Mention of Thomas and descendants appears in this article.)

(V) Simon, fourth son and ninth child of Abraham and Theodate (Roby) Drake, was born October 4, 1730, in Hampton, and died November 30, 1819, in Epping, where he settled about 1752. That town was then a wilderness, the first framed house being built there only two years before. There was at this time much trouble from the Indians, and during the year that Mr. Drake settled there a party of savages had killed Mr. Beard and two women about two miles from his residence. He was a man of remarkable exactness, and the method and neatness of his farm was only equaled by his wife in all that pertained to her department. He was a fine farmer, and had a nice farm, which he left to his younger son. His wife, Judith (Perkins) Drake, was born April 18, 1736, and died November 30, 1819. Their children were: James, Mary, Abraham, Josiah, Simon, David, Theodate, Sarah, Samuel and Betsy.

(VI) Major James, eldest child of Simon and Judith (Perkins) Drake,’ was born November 14, •755. m Epping, New Hampshire, and died in Pittsfield, February 26, 1834. He settled in the last named town when a very young man, being among its earliest settlers, and commenced clearing a farm from the wilderness. He was but nineteen years of age, upon the outbreak of the war of Independence, and abandoned his axe, shouldered a musket and joined a company then being organized for the Continental army. After sharing its fortunes in the ensuing struggle, he was discharged and returned to Pittsfield and resumed the work of clearing and improving his farm. He became major of a regiment of the state militia, and was always one of the town’s most prominent citizens. He was for many years a selectman, and long represented the town creditably in the state legislature. For integrity in all his dealings none could claim a higher place. “He was of middle stature, of fine figure, head round; and, in short, for a description of his person, that of Sir Francis Drake would be almost perfect •when applied to him.” This resemblance extended also to his mental and moral traits, for he was a man of great force of character, possessing a strong will and much determination, which qualities were tempered by sound judgment. His physical ability has seldom been equaled, and he was able to encounter the most extreme fatigue with but slight inconvenience. He became, eventually, the owner of several good farms, all of which he acquired by his great industry and economy. He was married December 17, 1781, to Hannah Ward, daughter of Lieutenant Cotton and Hannah (Mead) Ward, of Hampton. She was born October 31, 1763, and died December 17, 1848. They had twelve children, each of whom lived to be over sixty years of age. Their combined ages made a total of more than eight hundred and seventy years, the average age being seventy-two years, six months and sixteen days. Their names were as follows: Cotton Ward, Sarah, Mary, Hannah, Judith, Rachel, Theodate, Simon, Deborah, Betsy, James and Noah Ward.

(VII) Colonel James, third son and eleventh child of Major James and Hannah (Ward) Drake, was born June 29, 1805, in Pittsfield, and died in that town, April 7, 1870. He was born on the Drake homestead, near the Quaker meeting house, and was brought up to agriculture, which he followed successfully for some years. He also dealt extensively in live stock. He moved to the village of Pittsfield and became president of the Pittsfield Bank, afterwards the National Bank, and held that position for the remainder of his life. He was an excellent business man and acquired a handsome property. He figured prominently in public affairs, serving as selectman of the town and was a member of the state senate in 1847-48. In political struggles he supported the Democratic party. He early showed a fondness for military life, and rose from private to that of colonel in the militia. He commanded the eighteenth regiment with signal ability and credit until the abandonment of the militia system. He had a good figure and authoritative voice, and made a soldierly appearance, whether on foot or in the saddle. His strict adherence to principle was conspicuous among his commendable qualities, and the cause of morality and religion had in him a staunch and generous supporter. His death occurred at his home in Pittsfield Village. He was married, August 13, 1834, to Betsy Seavey, who was born October 14, 1811, a daughter of George and Betsy (Lane) Seavey, of Chichester, New Hampshire. (See Seavey). She was an attractive and charming woman, well educated, having finished her training at Hampton Academy: she was possessed of an evenly balanced mind with rare executive ability and self control, was always mindful of the happiness and comfort of others, was a church member, and hers was a life of rare christian devotion. She died September 28, 1865, and was survived by her husband for more than four years. They were the parents of three children: Georgianna Butters, Frank James and Nathaniel Seavey.

(VIII) Georgianna Butters, eldest child of James and Betsy (Seavey) Drake, was born January 15, 1836, at the old Drake homestead in Pittsfield, and is a woman of fine mental capacity and attainments, endowed with the graces and virtues essential to true womanhood, and is at home alike in the social and the domestic circle. She was married September 1, 1858, to Josiah Carpenter, now president of the Second National Bank in Manchester. Her musical ability early found opportunity in social functions and church work. In Manchester she is prominent in charitable and patriotic work, being president of the Manchester Children’s Home and vice-president of the Woman’s Aid and Relief Society, two of the oldest and leading charitable institutions of the city, and is also connected with many other charities. She is one of the charter members of the National Society of Colonial Dames in the State of New Hampshire, and for six years held the office of state regent in the National Society of Daughters of the American Revolution, from 1895 to 1901. She then declined a re-election, and was made honorary state regent for life. He regency covered a period of unusual prosperity in the society in New Hampshire, the chapters increasing from two to sixteen in number under her judicious and zealous guidance. For many years she has been a member of the Episcopal Church, and actively connected with the various branches of its work at home and throughout the diocese. With her husband she has devoted much time to travel, and seldom spends winter in the severe climate of New Hampshire. They have traversed nearly every section of our own country, and the countries of Europe and the Holy Land, Asia and Africa having contributed memories of various experiences and valuable information. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Carpenter: Georgia Ella, and a son who died in infancy. The daughter was born October 13, 1859, and grew up under most careful training and developed to womanhood, rich in intelligence and accomplishments, with a cheerfulness and kindliness of temper which endeared her to all. She was married, March 27, 1889, to Frank M. Gerrish, and they went abroad for a wedding tour. As in former ocean trips Mrs. Gerrish suffered severely from sea sickness, from the effects of which she died, August 29, 1889, nine weeks after her return to the beautiful home which her parents had erected and presented as a wedding gift.

(VIII) Frank James, son of James and Betsy (Seavey) Drake, was born November 3, 1842, on the Drake farm in South Pittstield. He pursued his studies at Pittsfield Academy and under tutors, and graduated from Dartmouth in 1865. He engaged in business in Manchester, New Hampshire, and died suddenly of appendicitis at his summer home in Barnstead, August 20, 1891′. He was married June 7, 1869, to Harriet C. E. Parker, daughter of Hon. James V. Parker. They were the parents of two children: James Drake and Helen. The former died in infancy, and the latter is now the wife of Charles Spalding Aldrich, of Troy, New York.

(VIII) Nathaniel Seavey, youngest child of James and Betsey (Seavey) Drake, was born September 16, 1851, in the house which he now occupies on Main street, Pittsfield. His education was gained in the public schools and completed at Pittsfield Academy. Having turned his attention to a business career, he engaged for two years in the clothing business, and afterwards was connected with the United States and Canada Express Company, and the American Express Company in Pittsfield, and subsequently spent some time in their offices in Concord, New Hampshire, and Boston, Massachusetts. Later he entered the employ of the C. B. Lancaster Shoe Company and had charge of its office, remaining with this concern about twelve years, until it removed to Keene, New Hampshire. During the last six years of this time he was superintendent of the factory and its branches, and the capacity of the plant was much enlarged. The business was the largest ever carried on in Pittsfield, involving a weekly pay-roll of about four thousand dollars. Mr. Drake was one of the founders of the Hill & Drake Shoe Company, afterwards known as the Drake & Sanborn Shoe Company. In this connection it is interesting to note that although Pittsfield has the reputation of being a manufacturing town, this shoe company, which employs some over fifty people, was the first enterprise giving employment to over a dozen men that was- conducted on home capital. All the other manufacturing enterprises of the town have been and are still owned by outside capital. In politics Mr. Drake is a Democrat, he has served with ability as moderator and treasurer many years. He is a director of the Pittsfield National Bank, and one of the trustees of the Farmers’ Savings Bank. Since the organization of the Pittsfield Aqueduct Company, in 1884, and the Pittsfield Gas Company, in 1888, he has served continuously as clerk of these corporations, and is a director in the latter company. He is a director of the Pittsfield Board of Trade, an officer in Catamount Grange, and a member of the Pittsfield Library Association, and is ever most active in promoting the welfare and highest interests of his native town. At the present time he deals quite extensively in real estate. His prominence in business circles, together with his high social standing, places him in the front rank among the leading citizens of Pittsfield.

Mr. Drake was married, March 17, 1873, ‘to Mary A. R. Green, who was born July 3, 1857, daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth (Chase) Green, of Pittsfield. She is a lady of pleasing manners and true womanly grace, sharing her husband’s popularity. They have two children: James Frank, born September I, 1880, and Agnes, April 2, 1883. The daughter and both parents are members of the Episcopal Church. After graduating as salutatorian of her class from high school in her native village, Agnes attended Lasell Seminary at Auburndale, Massachusetts, and received a diploma from there in 1903. She was a member of the glee club of the Delta Society, and was identified with Prize Company A, in the military drill, which is one of the prominent features of this seminary. Since returning to her home she has interested herself in the furtherance of whatever tends to the betterment of her native village, especially in its schools, and is a zealous member of the board of education.

(IX) James Frank, only son and elder child of Nathaniel S. and Mary A. R. (Green) Drake, was born September I, 1880, in Pittsfield village, New Hampshire. His early education was received in the graded schools of his native town, after which he entered Kimball Union Academy at Meriden, New Hampshire, from which he received a diploma in 1808. In the fall of that year he entered Dartmouth College and graduated therefrom with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1902. He then took a year of post-graduate study at Dartmouth in the Amos Tuck School of Administration and Finance, receiving in 1903 the degree of Master of Commercial Science. After completing his post-graduate work he went to Springfield, Massachusetts, to accept the position of secretary of the Springfield board of trade, which he still holds having received at the end of each year, in the shape of increase in salary, substantial recognition of the services he has rendered. While in college he became a member of the Theta Delta Chi Fraternity. Both as an undergraduate and as an alumnus he has taken an active part in all matters pertaining to its welfare, serving as the representative of the Dartmouth Charge at three national conventions of the fraternity. From the time of his graduation he has been actively interested in the prosperity of his college, and through his efforts a considerable number of young men have chosen that institution as their Alma Mater. He is chairman of the executive committee of the class of 1902 of Dartmouth, in whose hands is the control of all matters pertaining to the class. For the past three years he has served as secretary of the Dartmouth Alumni Association of Western Massachusetts. He has been chosen by Dartmouth College as one of a committee of nine from the body of alumni to take charge of the work of raising a larger scholarship fund for the college. He was the representative of Dartmouth College at the meeting of college men held in Springfield. May 17, 1906, to form a federation of college and university clubs, and was chosen as one of the organization committee, which reported the result of its work at another meeting held in Springfield, December 13, 1906, when a permanent organization known as the Federation of College and University Clubs in the United States, was formed. He was chosen treasurer of the Federation and a member of its executive council.

Soon after his arrival in Springfield he became connected with The Home Correspondence School of that city, serving as the head of the commercial department of that institution, which position he still occupies. In December, 1904, in company with an old school and college friend, he purchased The Home Correspondence School and has since served as secretary and treasurer of that corporation, the friend above referred to being the active manager, and Mr. Drake caring for the financial end of the business. Under their administration the school has prospered remarkably and to-day ranks as one of the very best institutions of its kind in the country. In addition to the business enterprise mentioned, Mr. Drake has found time to interest himself in some others which have brought him favorably before the public. In 1905 and again in 1906 he succeeded in securing for Springfield the annual championship football game between Dartmouth College and Brown University, taking upon himself the entire management of these contests—no small undertaking—and carried them through in a highly successful and creditable manner. His position as secretary of the Springfield board of trade has caused him to become connected with several other enterprises of a public nature. In May, 1903, soon after coming to Springfield, he became secretary of the Connecticut River Navigation Association, an organization which has for its object the opening of the Connecticut river to navigation from Hartford, Connecticut, to Holyoke, Massachusetts. In 1905 he was chosen secretary of the McKinley Memorial Commission, a commission chosen by the citizens of Springfield to take charge’ of a considerable fund raised by popular subscription for the purpose of erecting a memorial to the late President McKinley. He also identified himself with the Independence Day Association of Springfield, an organization that has charge of the observance of Indepcndance Day in that city, and has taken an active part in the association’s work.

For three years he has been a member of the educational committtee of the Young Men’s Christian Association of Springfield, which committee has under its supervision a school of over a hundred students with a competent force of instructors. He is a member of the Economic and the Diversity Club, the latter being one of Springfield’s prominent literary organizations. In June, 1903, he became a member of the Country Club of Springfield and is now serving as one of its executive committee and for the third year as its secretary. He is a member of the club’s tennis team and an enthusiastic golfer. In the fall of 1003 he was chosen a vice-president of the Massachusetts State Board of Trade and a member of its executive council, positions which he still holds. In politics he is a firm believer in the principles of the Democratic party as were his father and paternal grandfather before him. While still a small boy he displayed an unusual interest in matters political, and that interest he has always maintained.

(V) Thomas, tenth child and fifth son of Abraham (3) and Theodate (Roby) Drake, was born July 8, 1733, and died August 16, 1816, aged eightythree. He settled in Epping, and owned lands adjoining the farm of his brother Simon, but finally removed to Chichester, New Hampshire, where he died. He married (first), June 27, 1763, Patience

Towle, and (second), Edgerly, of Epping who died on the 15th and was buried on the 17th of June, 1775, the day of the battle of Bunker Hill. The children, all of the second marriage, and born at Epping, were seven: Abigail, Josiah, Eliphalct, Abraham, Daniel, Nancy and Sally.

(VI) Eliphalet, third child and second son of Thomas and (Edgerly) Drake, was born September 18, 1765, and died July 9, 1839. He was a farmer and spent his life in Chichester. He married, in 1788, Judith Staniels, of Chichester, who was born February 18, 1769, and who died May 24, l36i.

(VII) Thomas, son of Eliphalet and Judith (Staniels) Drake, born in Chichester, February 14, 1796, died April 29, 1842, aged forty-two years, waa successful farmer and stock raiser. He married in Loudon, December 29, 1824. Anna Winslow, who was born April 2, 1801, who died in 1872, and who was a daughter of Bartholomew and Hannah Winslow. Mr. Winslow died February 25, 1838, aged eighty years. Mrs. Winslow died November 4, 1857, aged ninety years. The children of Thomas and Anna (Winslow) Drake were: Jacob P., who died young, and James H, twins; Jacob E., Hannah Ann, Charles H., Colcord W. and James Henry (formerly Henry F.) and Sarah Ann (twins).

(VIII) James Henry, seventh child and fifth son of Thomas and Anna (Winslow) Drake, was born in Chichester, December 27, 1841. When he was about three years old his mother moved with her family to Concord, where she remained about seven years, and then moved to Manchester. James H. was educated in the public schools of Concord, Manchester and Loudon, and in New London and Newport academies. In 1861 he entered the employ of the Concord railroad as baggage-man in the Concord depot, and soon after became a brakenian. Subsequently he took a place with the Northern New Hampshire railroad as brakeman, and later as mail agent and expressman. He was promoted to conductor in 1866, and served in that capacity until 1899, when he retired from railroad employment, having been in service thirty-eight years, thirtythree years of which time he had been a conductor of a passenger train, running most of the time between Concord, New Hampshire, and White River Junction, Vermont. Soon after leaving the railroad service Mr. Drake went into business under the firm name of George L Lincoln & Company, of Concord, dealers in furniture, from which he withdrew two years later, and entered into partnership with Fred. Marden. under the name of Marden & Drake, shoe dealers, in which line he is now actively and successfully engaged. He is Independent in politics, and is not a member of any club or secret society. James H. Drake married, in 1887, Ellen F. Holt, born in 1843, a daughter of William K. Holt, of Loudon. They have two children: Helen, now a student at Vassar College: and Benjamin, a student in the Concord high school.

(IV) Captain Nathaniel, youngest child of Abraham (2) and Sarah (Hobbs) Drake, was born May 7, 1695, at “Drake Side,” in Hampton, and lived through life in his native town. He was married (first) June I, 1716, to Jane Lunt, who died December 2, 1743, at the age of fifty-one years. He was married (second), November 22. 1744, to Abigail Foss, a widow, of Rye. His children, all born of the first marriage, were: Robert, Nathaniel, Jane, Abraham, and Sarah and Mary (twins).

(V) Abraham (3), third son and fourth child of Nathaniel and Jane (Lunt) Drake, was born March 1, 1726, in Hampton, and settled in what is now Brentwood. He was married, March 5, 1752, to Martha Eaton of Salisbury, Massachusetts.

(VI) Abraham (4), son of Abraham (3) and Martha (Eaton) Drake, was born June 7, 1758, in Brentwood, New Hampshire, and died in New Hampton. He was married, January 27, 1782, in New Hampton, to Anna Burnham, who was born July 26, I7S6, in Lee, New Hampshire, daughter of Joshua Burnham, and died February I, 1805. They resided in New Hampton, where all their children were born, namely: Polly (died young), Abraham, Polly (died youngj, Joshua B., Joseph, Nancy, Betsey S., Jeremiah M., Thomas, Polly and Simeon D.

(VII) Joseph Burnham, third son and fifth child of Abraham (4) and Anna (Burnham) Drake, was born December 13, 1789, in New Hampton, and married Polly (or Mary) Thompson. They resided in New Hampton, where they had the following children: Louisa, Nancy, John A., Betsey Dow, Joseph Thompson, Francis M. and Abraham.

(VIII) Betsey Dow, third daughter and fourth child of Joseph B. and Polly (Thompson) Drake, was born November 4, 1822, in New Hampton, and became the wife of Hiram Clark. (See Clark, IV).

George Allen Drake, business man of DRAKE Dover, New Hampshire, is perhaps one of the best examples of the purely selfmade man that can be found in Strafford county, where he has lived something less than fifteen years. He is a native of Illinois and was born at Chatsworth in that state, April 10, 1868. His father, Charles W. Drake, died when George was seven years old, and within the next year he was left an orphan by the death of his mother. During the next five years he lived with the family of his brother and went to school when it was possible for him to do so, but in that respect his opportunities for obtaining more than an elementary education were very limited, at the age of thirteen years he started out to make his own way in life, turning his hand to whatever he could find to do and often doing the work of a boy much older and stronger than himself. At the age of eighteen he secured employment on the Union Pacific railroad, where he worked about two years, then went out to work on a ranch, and also for a time was in the service of the T. & S. railroad. In 1894 Mr. Drake came east and located in Dover, New Hampshire, having saved the money he had earned in railroading and ranching in the west, and with that as a capital he was able to start a general livery business in the city. This he continued successfully about ten years, and in July, 1905, purchased the steam carpet cleaning works formerly carried on by Daniel Page, and is still its proprietor.

Mr. Drake married, Carrie E., daughter of Timothy Hussey, and has one son, Charles W. Drake, born in Dover, December 18, 1899.

From British History online:

The manor of Nutwell was given, at an early period, by the Dinham family (fn. 29) (it having been parcel of their barony of Hartland (fn. 30) ,) to the priory of Dinham, in Brittany. After the suppression of alien priories, the Dinhams became again possessed of this manor; and Sir John Dinham, who was treasurer to King Henry VII., and afterwards Lord Dinham, built here a castellated mansion, for his own residence, which Risdon calls a fair and stately dwelling. Sergeant Prideaux purchased this estate of the heirs of Dinham. In Sir William Pole’s time, it was the seat of Sir Thomas Prideaux; afterwards, successively, of Sir Henry Ford, and the Pollexfens. Of late years, it was the property and seat of Sir Francis Drake, Bart., who made great alterations in the house and grounds; the chapel was converted into a handsome library. From Sir Francis Drake, it passed by devise to his nephew, the late Lord Heathfield; and on his death, in 1813, to his sister’s son, Thomas Trayton Fuller Elliot Drake, Esq., lately created a baronet, whose property and residence it now is. Nutwell House was garrisoned for the parliament, during the civil wars.

YARCOMBE, or YARTCOMBE, in the hundred of Axminster and in the deanery of Dunkeswell, lies on the borders of Dorsetshire and Somersetshire, about seven miles from Honiton, and four from Chard in Somersetshire. The river Yarty, in a course of about four miles, divides Yarcombe from the above-mentioned counties. Marsh, on the new road of communication from London to Exeter, through Ilminster and Chard, is in this parish.

William the Conqueror gave the manor of Yarcombe to the abbot and convent of St. Michael in Normandy, who allotted it to their priory of Otterton, in this county. After the dissolution the manor, or a moiety of it, was granted to Robert Earl of Leicester, who sold it to Robert Drake, Esq., of the Ash family, by whom it was conveyed to the celebrated Sir Francis Drake, the circumnavigator, who was possessed of the other moiety by grant from the crown. It descended (with the impropriation) to the late Lord Heathfield, and is now the property of his nephew, Sir Thomas Trayton Fuller Elliot Drake, Bart., who is improving the estate, and making extensive plantations. (fn.31) Footnotes: 29 Oliver de Dinham possessed it in the reign of Henry II. Madox’s Hist. of Exchequer, p. 409. 30 Hundred Roll. 31 Sprigge’s England’s Recovery, p. 159, 160.

Shevehayne, now esteemed the manor-house, was anciently in the family of Speke, and passed, by successive sales, to Woode, Stawell, and Martyn. In this house, which is occupied occasionally by Sir T. T. F. E. Drake, is a fine portrait of Sir Francis Drake. Paynshay, formerly parcel of the manor, was, in 1260, given by the prior of Otterton to William Pyne, or Payne. It passed, by descent, to Sturton and Daubeny, by successive sales, to Smyth, Woode, and Bret. It is now the property of Sir T. T. F. E. Drake, who purchased it with the great tithes, about 1808, of Mr. Codrington, now Sir Bethel Codrington, Bart. The King is patron of the vicarage, which, before the year 1247, was endowed with a glebe of 30 acres, and certain gardens and houses. Source: Chartulary of Otterton Priory, in Chapple’s Collections.

Drake pedigree from John Drake Esquire of Exmouth1

Drake pedigree from John Drake Esquire of Exmouth1

Drake pedigree from John Drake Esquire of Exmouth2

Drake pedigree from John Drake Esquire of Exmouth2

Drake pedigree from John Drake Esquire of Exmouth3

Drake pedigree from John Drake Esquire of Exmouth3

Drake pedigree from John Drake Esquire of Exmouth4

Drake pedigree from John Drake Esquire of Exmouth4

Drake Family1Drake Family2Drake Family3Drake Family4Drake Family5Drake Family6Drake Family7Drake Family8

Riggs Hills and Riggs Family lineage and origins

Riggs COA

Riggs Family Papers located in Library of Congress

It is, perhaps, not necessary to state that this little Appendix is intended to embrace only four or five families, bearing the Riggs’ name, but whose lineage has not been distinctly traced to Edward of Roxbury. They will be separately indexed, and the references will be to pages only and not to numbers. “The Maryland Family” shows much research and is specially valuable as furnishing starting-points for other tracings. It is so well done that it is given here in the form and words of its compiler, Mr. E. Francis Riggs, of Washington, D. C, and is as follows:

If too late to aid in furnishing matter for the work, which I am glad to know you now have in hand, I think I can tell you some interesting things. You ask for my ” Maryland family, ” but my investigations have been so directed to my father’s immediate line (which was not the eldest) that it would seem but fragmentary and incomplete to give you this as a satisfactory history of the clan. The name existed early in Maryland. One Francis Riggs was in Calvert County in 1663, acquiring no less than 2,300 acres of land, and died intestate in 1667, when his estates in the province were claimed by his first cousin, Joseph Riggs of Virginia. In the proceedings before the High Provincial Court the claimant set forth that his deceased cousin was son of John Riggs of Southampton (England), and that he, Joseph, was the son of Francis Riggs of Fareham, County of Hampshire (or Hants). (Fareham is a pretty market town at the northwest end of Portsmouth harbor, twelve miles southeast of Southampton and nine northwest of Portsmouth.) Of these two personages we learn no more, beyond the fact that Joseph established himself in Calvert County, and died there in 1671. In Virginia one John Riggs held land in lower Norfolk County in 1653. In 1689 Ensign John Riggs brought the official announcement of the accession of William and Mary to the throne to Nicholson, Lieutenant-Governor of New York.

My earliest known ancestor was John Riggs. An old Baxter’s Directory, printed in 1672, which from internal evidence probably belonged to his wife’s (Davis) family, mentions his death August 17, 1762, aged 75 years. He was, therefore, born in 1687. On the 16th of January, 1721-2 he married, at St. John’s Church, Annapolis, Mary, daughter of Thomas Davis and Mary, his wife, who (as I know from the same Baxter’s Directory) was born January 9, 1702, and died December 13, 1768. John Riggs is first mentioned in 1716 in the will of John Marriott, of Anne Arundel County, who bequeathed to him 50 acres, part of a tract called “Shepard’s Forest.” In 1723 he had surveyed a tract of land called “Riggs’ Hills, “on the northern branch of the Patuxent River, near the present village of Savage, containing 200 acres, and in 1725 he purchased an adjoining tract containing 142 acres, known as part of “Rich Neck.” Both of these tracts were in Queen Caroline Parish. The church was near what is now Laurel, Howard County, and John Riggs was a pewholder in 1736.

He also bought in 1751 a tract of land of 1,000 acres, called “Bordley’s Choice,” in that part of Frederick County now known as Montgomery County, near the village of Brookeville. John Riggs died, as I have said (and was probably buried at Riggs’ Hills, where a few graves, unmarked, are visible; his will was proved September 22, 1762), August 17, 1762, having had a numerous progeny, viz.:

1. Thomas, born October 20, 1722, died October 25, 1797.

2. Rachel, born June 11, 1724, married to Edward Warfield, October 6, 1741, by the Rev. James Macgill, at Queen Caroline Parish, died April 16, 1794, having had twelve children.

3. John, born July 11, 1726.

4. James, born April 13, 1728; was “Tobacco Inspector” for the Parish, September 6, 1736; was taxed, from 1756 to 1762, 300 pounds of tobacco annually as a “bachelor”; died August 14, 1780.

5. Ruth, born October 20, 1730, married Greenberry Griffith, had ten children, died October 18, 1779.

6. Mary, born September 24, 1732, married Benjamin Griffith, had eight children.

7. Catherine, born February 24, 1734, married Hyatt, died April 8,

1802.

8. Ann, born July 29, 1738.

9. Samuel, born October 6, 1740, was also a Tobacco Inspector in Queen Caroline Parish, September 2, 1766-7, married in 1767 Amelia Dorsey. daughter of Colonel Philemon Dorsey, of Anne Arundel County, and Catherine (Ridgeley) his wife; died at his farm, part of “Bordley’s Choice,” near Brookeville, Montgomery County (formerly part of Frederick County), May 25, 1814, and is there buried beside his wife, who was born August 23, 1749, and died August 6, 1807. They had twelve children.

10. Elisha, born October 4, 1742, married Delila Hammond, served as Captain of Continental Militia in Colonel Edward Gaither’s Battalion, and died June 6, 1777, and had three children.

11. Achsah (or “Nackey”), born January 27, 1745-6, married

Brown.

12. Amon, born April 21, 1748, married Ruth Griffith (died 1830, set. 83), December 21, 1769, died March 16, 1822, had nine children.

Family of Samuel R1ggs (of John) and Amelia (Dorsey):

1. Mary, born August 14, 1768, married Henry Griffith.

2. Henrietta, born December 22, 1769, married Daniel Gaither.

3. Thomas, born January 12, 1772, married November 17, 1796, Mary, daughter of his Uncle Elisha (of John) Riggs, died January 10, 1845, and had issue; was an eminent merchant in Baltimore.

4. Anna, born August 12, 1773, married her cousin, John H. (of Elisha), died February 18, 1796.

5. Reuben, born May 23, 1775, married Mary Thomas, died April 25, 1829.

6. George Washington, born August 14, 1777, was a successful merchant at Georgetown, D. C, and later in Baltimore, Md., married first Eliza Robinson, secondly Rebecca Norris, widow, and had issue by both wives.

7. Elisha, born June 13, 1779, married first Alice Lawrason (of James), of Alexandria, Va., September 17, 1812 (who died April 16, 1817, aged 25), leaving two sons, and secondly Mary Ann Karrick (of Joseph), July 16, 1822. Was highly successful in mercantile pursuits in Georgetown, D. C, and later in New York City, where he died August 3, 1853; buried in New York.

8. Eleanor, born June 7, 1781, died August, 1804.

9. Romulus, born December 22, 1782, married Mercy Ann Lawrason (of James), sister of Alice (above mentioned), May 29, 1810. Was a prosperous merchant and well-known citizen of Philadelphia, Pa., where he died October 2, 1846, leaving issue.

10. Julia, born December 22, 1784, died 1862, unmarried.

11. Samuel, born June 14, 1786, died September, 1805.

12. Remus, born January 12, 1790, married Katherine Adams, and had issue, died December 18, 1867.

Family of El1sha R1ggs (of John) and Delila Hammond, his wife:

1. John Hammond, married his cousin Anna (of Samuel).

2. Mary, born May 23, 1776, married her cousin Thomas (of Samuel), died May 10, 1829.

3. Sarah, born 1777, died October 22, 1795, s.p.

Family of Amon R1ggs (of John) and Ruth Griffith, his wife:

1. John, born 1771.

2. Henry, born 1772.

3. Charles, born 1774, died 1802.

4. Amon, born 1776.

5. James, born 1779.

6. Samuel, born 1781.

7. Joshua, born 1790, died 1810. 8 and 9. Two daughters.

Family of Thomas (of Samuel) Riggs and Mary (Riggs) his wife:

1. Sarah Hammond, born September 19, 1797, married Griffith,

died September 25, 1823, had issue.

2. Samuel, b. August 20, 1800, married Margaret Norris.

3. Caroline Eleanor, born June 7, 1803, married Caleb Dorsey, died April 13, 1877.

4. Elisha, born July 6, 1810, married Avolina Warfield, died June 16, 1883.

5. Thomas John, born May 15, 1815.

Family of El1sha (of Samuel) Riggs and Alice (Lawrason), his first wife:

1. George Washington, born at Georgetown, D. C, July 4, 1813, married at Madison, N. J., June 23, 1840, Janet Madeleine Cecelia SheddenBanker, died at his country seat, Greenhill, Md., near Washington, D. C, August 24, 1881.

2. Lawrason, born November 22, 1814, married first Sophia Crittenden (died without issue), secondly Frances Behn Clapp, thirdly Mary Bright, died October 13, 1884, leaving issue.

Family of Romulus (of Samuel) Riggs and Mercy Ann (Lawrason), his wife:

1. Samuel James, born September, 1811, married Medora Cheatham, of Nashville, Tenn., died July 4, 1847, s.p.

2. Amelia Dorsey, born 1813, married James P. Erskine, left issue.

3. Alice Ann, born 1815, married James W. Bacon, M.D., of Philadelphia, died February 21, 1839, leaving issue.

4. James Lawrason, born 1817, married thrice.

5. Mercy Ann, born 1819, died November 21, 1821.

6. Mary Elizabeth, born 1821, married Robert Colgate, of New York City.

7. Henrietta, born 1823, married Samuel G. Battle, of Mobile, Ala., had issue; lives in Philadelphia.

8. Julia Mandeville, born 1825, married George H. Boker, of Philadelphia, died 1899.

9. Illinois, married Charles H. Graff, of Philadelphia.

So much for the first four generations of the family in Maryland ; more is scarcely needed for your purpose, and besides my notes are incomplete in the various branches outside my immediate family, in the later generations.

As to the origin of the Riggs family, I have always been convinced that the New England, New Jersey, and Maryland clans were of the same common origin, and that their origin was English. In England, the name is, I believe, extinct. I have been unable to find it there. I had research made in England years ago, and from wills filed in the public records it seems that the name under various forms, Rygge, Rigge, Rigges, and Riggs appears early in the fifteenth century. One, Thomas Riggs, of Southampton, whose will was proved in 1551, was an alderman of that town (County of Hampshire). His son Thomas died possessed of the manor of Fareham, near Southampton, and other sons, Edward, William, and John, are mentioned in the father1s (Thomas) will. Thomas (second) had a son Rafe, who married Mary Blake, of Hampshire. Raff. had—

1. Thomas, of Fareham; buried at Fareham, 1638.

2. Robert, of Fareham, married Margery Chambers, of Southampton; his will proved 1644.

3. Ralph, three times Mayor, City of Winchester (Hampshire), married Mary Johnson, of Buckinghamshire; will proved 1647.

4. Francis, married Katherine Knight, died before 1636.

5. William, baptized at Fareham, 1593.

6. John, of Southampton, merchant, married Marie Blake Hopgood, 1626; will proved 1636.

7. Mary, baptized 1585, married thrice.

8. Elizabeth, baptized 1591.

9. Anne, baptized 1596, married twice.

Thomas, son of Robert and Margery Chambers, had—

1. Robert, born 1632, ob. s.p.

2. Elizabeth, married Robert Coates.

3. Margery, married December 4, 1631, John Earlesman.

4. Mary, baptized February 27, 1629-30, married Sir John Otway, Knt.

5. Margaret, married Thomas Baker.

Ralph (or Rafe) Riggs, of Winchester, third son of Rafe and Mary (Blake) Riggs, married Mary Johnson, had—

1. Francis.

2. Ralph, ob. s.p.

3. Thomas, married Constance Hook, of Hook, County of Southampton.

4. Edmund, of Winchester, will proved April 27, 1660, buried in Winchester Cathedral, married Margaret Savage, of King Clere, County of Southampton.

5. Ogle, married Mercy, co-heiress of John Lock, of Hollist, County of Sussex, died 1705, set. 69.

6. Mary, married Anthony Yelden, of Winchester.

7. Elizabeth.

Franc1s R1ggs, fourth son of Rafe and Mary (Blake) Riggs, married Katherine Knight, and had—

1. Francis;

2. Joseph;

3. Benjamin;

4. Alice, married Thomas Heither;

5. Elizabeth, married Masey;

6. Catherine, married , Mitchell;

7. Susan, married Charlete.

John R1ggs, of Southampton, merchant, sixth son of Rafe and Mary (Blake) Riggs, married Mary Hopgood at Fareham, January 12, 1622-3, had—

1. John;

2. Thomas, born 1636;

3. Francis;

4. Maria;

5. Elizabeth;

6. Anne.

Thomas R1ggs, third son of Ralph and Mary (Johnson) Riggs, married Constance Hook, and had—

1. Ralph, baptized at Fareham, April 9, 1657.

2. Constance, baptized at Fareham, July 29, 1650, married George Downs.

3. Thomas, baptized at Fareham, November 25, 1652.

Edmund R1ggs, of Winchester, fourth son of Ralph and Mary (Johnson) Riggs, married Margaret Savage, and had—

1. Edmond,

2. Thomas,

3. Mary.

Ogle R1ggs, fifth son of Ralph and Mary (Johnson) Riggs, married Mercy Lock, and had—

1. Thomas, born 1651;

2. Ogle, of Hollist House, County of Sussex;

3. Robert,

4. Ralph,

5. Elizabeth,

6. Mercy,

7. Mary.

Ogle R1ggs, of Hollist House, Eastbourne, County of Sussex, married and had a son Ogle, born 1687, High Sheriff in 1730, of Hollist House, who married Elizabeth, daughter of Michael Mushgrave, of “Parish of Christchurch,” N. Virginia (she died January 23, 1762). Ogle died December 7, 1766. They had—

1. Thomas, Captain in Royal Navy, married Anne Bettesworth 1748, died in South Carolina, s.p.

2. Ogle, born 1736, died February 5, 1773, s.p.

3. Mercy, died October 18, 1772.

These names, representing several generations of the (English) family of Hampshire and Sussex, are to be found in “Berry’s Visitation of Hants,” and the “Visitation of Sussex” by the same author, somewhat amplified as to dates, etc., by my own searches and by a pedigree prepared for me at the Herald’s College, London, some years ago. I had prepared also a reference list of wills on record in England and abstractsfrom the wills of certain of the Southampton Riggs, but the latter were lost by a professional genealogist who attempted to fix the origin of my ancestor John. While my efforts have been unsuccessful in this, I have always felt convinced that our descent was from this Southampton and Fareham family. I have seen the parish church, Fareham, and in the chancel in a prominent place are the monuments of several of the family, with armorial bearings. The Manor House of Fareham, once held by the Riggs’ family, I was not able to identify. The arms, as given in Berry, of the Hampshire Riggs are: Gules, a fesse, vair, between these three water spaniels, argent, each holding in the mouth a birdbolt, or, plumed argent. Crest: a talbot, passant, gules, eared, or, holding in the mouth a birdbolt of the second (or) plumed argent.

During the past summer I had some correspondence with a professional genealogist, Mr. Gustave Anjou, of 132 Nassau Street, New York City (or P. O. Box 2,611), who informed me that he had devoted years, to tracing the history of the family, in this country and in England. L have recently written to him asking if you might count on his aid, but he has replied that his records are only available on payment of a proper return for his labor and then not for publication. It may or may not be of value to you to communicate with Mr. Anjou. I may add that the pedigree I give of the Hampshire Riggs may be incomplete and that individuals are missing in it from whom the American emigrants were descended. Yours faithfully, E. Francis Riggs.

Taken From , Appendix Genealogy of the Riggs family: with a number of cognate branches descended … By John Hankins Wallace

Riggs Genealogy

Genealogical history of the Lewis Family

Taken from: “Some prominent Virginia families: Volume 2 – Page 620″ by Louise Pecquet du Bellet, Edward Jaquelin, Martha Cary Jaquelin

lewis-arms

Motto translated means”Every land is a brave man’s country.”

It is a question very often discussed of late as to whether the hour makes the man or the man the hour. To a student of the history of Virginia an answer is very soon given, for since the settlement of Jamestown, in 1607, which was virtually the birth of this country, there has never arisen a crisis of any kind when Virginia, our mother State, has not had one or more of her sons ready to meet it. When the hour arrives the man appears. We may search the pages of history in vain for a nobler or as noble a group of men as Washington and his patriot Virginians in 1776.

The Lewis family of Virginia is one of the most distinguished families in the State. It is connected by marriage with many of the best-known names, such as Washington. Marshall, Fielding, Merriweather, Daingerfield, Taliaferro and others. The men of the family from the time when they first settled in the colony, about the middle of the seventeenth century, have been men of action and distinction; they have won for themselves the most remarkable record as soldiers. It is recorded on the tombstone of “Pioneer John” that he furnished five sons for the Revolution. There were five colonels in the Revolution—Colonel Nicholas, Colonel Fielding, Colonel William, Colonel Charles and Colonel Joel—and quite a number of majors and captains. The Lewises also won a gallant record in the War of 1812, the Mexican War and in the Confederate States Army.

The Lewis family were originally French Huguenots, and left France after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, 1685. Three brothers—namely, William, Samuel and John—fled to England. (See “History of the Huguenots.”) Shortly afterwards William removed to the north of Ireland, where he married a Miss McClelland; Samuel fixed his residence in Wales, while John continued in England. Descendants of each of these three brothers are supposed to have settled in Virginia.

About the middle of the seventeenth century four brothers of the Lewis family left Wales.

I. Samuel Lewis, went to Portugal; nothing is known of him.

II. William Lewis, d. in Ireland.

III. General Robert Lewis, d. in Gloucester Co., Va.

IV. John Lewis, d. in Hanover Co., Va.

1. I. William Lewis1, one of the Welsh brothers; d. in Ireland. Married Miss McClelland and left one son:

2. I. Andrew Lewis3. Married Miss Calhoun.
They had Issue:

3. I. John Lewis2, b. 1678, in Ireland. Married Margaret Lynn.

4. II. Samuel Lewis2, b. 1680. ‘No issue.

III. John Lewis3 (Andrew2, William1). In 1720 John Lewis left Ireland a fugitive, having stabbed Sir Inango Campbell, his Irish landlord, who attempted in a lawless and brutal manner to evict him from his premises, of which he held a freehold lien, and had slain an invalid brother, before his eves. He first took refuge in Portugal, and later fled to America and settled in Pennsylvania; then in Augusta Co., Va. In Campbell’s “History of Virginia” he is styled as Pioneer John Lewis. He is described as being tall and of great muscular strength, and was one of the best backwoodsmen of his day. He built his house with portholes in it, so that he could successfully contend with the savage tribes that infested the country. When Augusta County was organized he was the founder of Staunton, the county seat, and was one of the first magistrates appointed by the Governor. John Lewis died in 1762. On his tombstone it is recorded that he gave five sons to fight the battles of the American Revolution.

John Lewis and Margaret Lynn, his wife, had issue:

.”>. I. Samuel Lewis4, served with distinction as a captain in the war between the English and French colonists. His brothers, Andrew. William and Charles, were members of his company, and all four were at Braddock’s defeat, and three of them were wounded. Samuel was afterwards conspicuous in the defense of Greenbrier County and the border settlements from the Indians. He was born 1716: d. unmarried.

6. II. Thomas Lewis4, b. in Ireland, 1718.

7. III. Andrew Lewis4, b. in Ireland, 1750.

8. IV. William Lewis4, b. in Ireland, 1724.

9. V. Margaret Lewis4, b. in Ireland, 1726.

10. VI. Anne Lewis4, b. in Ireland, 1728.

11. VII. Charles Lewis4, b. in Virginia, 1736.

Alice Lewis4. Married Mr. Madison.

IV. Col. Andrew Lewis4 (John”, Andrew2, William1), son of John Lewis (Pioneer) and Margaret Lynn, daughter of the Laird of Loch Lynn, chieftain of the once powerful Clan of Loch Lynn: b. in Ireland, 1720. He emigrated with his father to America, and settled in Augusta Co., Va. He took a very active part in the Indian Wars. In 1754 he was twice wounded in the battle of Fort Necessity, under General Washington, by whom he was appointed major of hie regiment. General Lewis was, with four of his brothers, in a company of which the eldest was captain, at Braddock’s defeat, in 1758. “General Andrew Lewis was several times a member of the Colonial Legislature.

An Indian war being anticipated, Lord Dunmore appointed General Lewis commander of the Southern forces. September 11, 1774, General Lewis, with eleven hundred men, commenced his march through the wilderness. After a march of one hundred and sixty miles they reached Point Pleasant, at the junction of the Great Kanawha and Ohio rivers, and there on October 10, 1774, he signally defeated the Shawnee Indians. He is known as the hero of Point Pleasant. His strikingly majestic form and figure never failed to remind me of the memorable remark made by the Governor of the colony of New York, when General Lewis was a commissioner on behalf of Virginia at the treaty of Fort Stanwix, in New York, in 1768, that “the earth seemed to tremble under him as he walked along.” His statue is one of those around that of the father of his country, in Capitol Square, Richmond, Va.; it is marked with the name of Andrew Lewis, the “Hero of Point Pleasant.”

General Washington, under whom Lewis had served in various capacities, had formed such a high estimate of Lewis’s character and ability, it is said, that when the chief command of the Revolutionary army was proposed to Washington, he expressed a wish that it had been given to General Lewis. General Lewis died in 1781.

General Andrew Lewis married (1749) Elizabeth Givens, of Augusta Co., Va., and left issue:

12. I. Captain John Lewis5, who was an officer under his father at Grant’s defeat, when he was made prisoner and carried to Quebec and thence to France. Married Patsy Love of Alexandria, Va. Issue:

13. I. Andrew Samuel Lewis5. Married Miss Whilby.

14. II. Charles Lewis5. Married daughter of Gen. Abraham Trigg, of Virginia.

15. III. Elizabeth Lewis5. Married, second, Mr. Ball; third,

Mr. Marshall. (Her first husband was Mr. Luke, of Alexandria, Va.)

16. II. Thomas Lewis”. Married Miss Evans, of Point Pleasant, Va.

17. III. Colonel Samuel Lewis5, U. S. A.; d. unmarried in Greenbrier Co., Va.

18. IV. Colonel Andrew Lewis”, V. S. A. of the Brent

Mountain, b. 1759. Married Eliza, daughter of John Madison, of Montgomery Co., Va.; d. 1844.
They had Issue:

19. I. Charles Lewis5, d. unmarried.

20. II. Thomas Lewis5, a distinguished lawyer who killed and was killed by Mr. McHenry in a duel with rifles at the distance of thirty yards, the first duel at close quarters ever fought with rifles in Virginia. Left no issue.

21. III. — Lewis8, d. young.

22. IV. . Lewis5, d. young.

23. V. Agatha Lewis”, b. 1778. Married Col. Elijah McClanahan, of Botetourt Co., Va.

24. V. Annie Lewis”. Married Roland Madison, of Kentucky.
They had Issue:

25. I. John Madison”.

26. II. Eliza Lewis Madison”. Married Mr. Worthington of Maryland.

27. III. Andrew Lewis Madison”, d. captain in U. S. A.

28. IV. Roland Madison”, Jr., lived (1873) in Rushville, Indiana.

29. VI. William Lewis”, b. 1764. Married, first, Lucy, daughter of John Madison; second, Nancy McClenahan.

1. 1. General Robert Lewis1^ brother of William Lewis1, with his wife and two sons came to Virginia in 1645, in the good ship “Blessing.” The names of the sons were:

2. I. Colonel John Lewis2, Sr.

3. II. William Lewis2, of Chemokins, St. Peters Parish. New Kent Co., Va.

I. Colonel John Lewis2 Sr. (General Robert Lewis1). Married Isabella Warner, daughter of Augustine Warner, of Warner Hall, Gloucester Co., Va., Speaker of the first House of Burgesses.
They had issue:
4. I. Major John Lewis3, Jr., of Gloucester Co., Va., ii member of the Virginia Council, b. Nov. 30, 1669. Married Frances Fielding. She d. 1731; he d. 1754.

5. II. Warner Lewis3. Married Eleanor, widow of William Gooch, son of Sir William Gooch, Governor of Virginia, and daughter of James Bowles, of Maryland.

0. III. Lewis3. Married Col. Willis, of Fredericksburg, Va.

7. IV. Lewis3. Married Francis Merriweather.

8. V. Major John Lewis3.

9. VI. Isabella Lewis3.

10. VII. Anna Lewis3.
III. Major John Lewis3 (John2, Robert1), of Gloucester Co., Va., member of the Virginia Council, b. November 30, 1669. Married Frances Fielding: d. 1731. He d. 1754. Issue:

11. I. Colonel Robert Lewis4, of Belvoir, Albemarle Co., Va.

12. II. Colonel Charles Lewis4, of the Byrd.

13. III. Colonel Fielding Lewis4. Married, first, Catherine; second, Betty Washington.

IV. Warner Lewis4 (Warner3, John2, Robert1), son of Warner Lewis3 and Eleanor Gooch. Married, first. Mary Chiswell; second, Mary Fleming.

Issue by first marriage:

14. I. Warner Lewis”. Married Courtenay Norton. Issue: I. Courtenay Warner Lewis5. Married Mr. Selden, of Gloucester, Va.

IV. Colonel Fielding Lewis4 (Major John Lewis3 Sr, Col. John Lewis2 Sr-, General Robert Lewis1), second son of Warner Lewis and Eleanor Gooch. Married Agnes Hanvood. They lived at Weyanoke, on the James River. Fielding Lewis held a high place in society, and was considered one of the fathers of Virginia agriculture. His portrait, with that of John Taylor, of Caroline, and other distinguished agriculturists, may now be seen in the rooms of the Agricultural Society of Richmond, placed there by order of the society. Issue:

15. I. Margaret Waddrop Lewis”.

16. II. Frances Fielding Lewis”.

17. III. Anne Lewis””.

18. IV. Frances Lewis7′.

19. V. Eleanor W. Lewis”.

Margaret W. Lewis5 married Thomas Marshall, eldest son of Chief Justice Marshall. Their descendants are given in Volume I, Chapters V, VI, VII.

Eleanor Warner Lewis”. Married Robert Douthat. Their descendants now living in Baltimore are:

I. Mr. Montgomery 0. Selden, his children Allen and Elizabeth Selden.

II. Mr. Bolling Selden, his children Mrs. Swope, Susan P.
Selden, Agnes Lewis Selden and Alice Selden.

The descendants of Mrs. Courtenay Warner Lewis, who married Mr. William Selden, of Gloucester, are:

Mrs. Charles Dimmock, Mrs. William Dimmock, and Mrs. Loyd Tabb. This branch of the family inherited Warner Hall in Gloucester.

V. Frances Fielding Lewis5 (Fielding4. Warner’1, John2, Robert1), daughter of Fielding Lewis and Agnes Harwood, his wife. Married Archibald Taylor, of Norfolk, Va. Issue:

20. I. Fielding Lewis Taylor”, a colonel in the Confederate army, who was killed in a battle. Married Farley Fauntleroy. Issue:

21. I. Archibald Taylor7. Married Martha Fauntleroy.

Issue:

22. I. Archibald Taylor”.

23. II. Thomas Taylor8, served under Gen. Robert E. Lee

in the Confederate army. He was killed at the Battle of Shiloh. V. Eleanor Warner Lewis8 (Fielding4. Warner3, John2, Robert1), daughter of Fielding Lewis and Agnes Harwood, his wife. Married Robert Douthat, of Weyanoke. Issue:

I Robert Douthat5. Married, first, Mary Ambler Marshall; second, Betty W. Wade. Issue Vol. I.

The issue of William H. Selden and Jane Douthat, were:
I. Robert Selden..
II. Eleanor Selden.

III. William Selden.

IV. Bolling Selden.
V. Agnes Selden.

VI. Montgomery Selden.
VII. Lewis Selden.

IV. Col. Robert Lewis4 (Major John Lewis2, John2, Robert1), of Belvoir, Albemarle Co., Va. Married Jane, daughter of Nicholas Merriweather; d. 1757. His will is recorded in Albemarle Co., Va.

IV. Col. Charles Lewis4 (Major John Lewis3, John2, Robert1), of the Byrd. Married Lucy, daughter of John Taliaferro, of the Manor Plantation, of Snow Creek, Spottsylvania Co., Va., about 1750.

IV. Colonel Fielding Lewis4 (Major John Lewis3, John2, Robert1), son of Major John Lewis and Frances Fielding, his wife. Married (1746) Catherine Washington, a cousin of General Washington; second, Betty Washington, sister of General Washington.

Col. Fielding settled near Fredericksburg, Va. He was a member of the House of Burgesses, a merchant and vestryman. There is in the possession of a descendant of Col. Fielding Lewis and his wife, Betty Washington, an old family Bible, a hereditary relic for five generations, having been given by Mary Ball Washington to her only daughter, Betty (Mrs. Fielding Lewis), and transmitted directly to her descendants. During the Revolution, in 1776, Col. Fielding Lewis was an ardent patriot and did special service by superintending the manufacture of arms for the use of the army.

Col. Fielding Lewis and Catherine Washington, his first wife, had issue:

24. I. John Lewis5, b. 1747. Married five times.

25. II. Francis Lewis5, d. young.

26. III. Warner Lewis5, d. young. Issue by second wife:

27. IV. Fielding Lewis”.

28. V. Augustine Lewis”.

29. VI. Warner Lewis”.

30. VII. George Washington Lewis”
.
31. VIII. Mary Lewis”. married William Lyons

32. IX. Charles Lewis”.

33. X. Samuel Lewis”.

34. XL Bettie Lewis”.

35. XII. Lawrence Lewis”.

36. XIII. Robert Lewis”.

37. XIV. Howell Lewis5, b. 1771. Married Miss Pollard, and

left issue.

V. John Lewis5 (Fielding4, John1, John2, Robert1), son of Col. Fielding Lewis and Catherine Washington, his first wife, b. 1747. He was a graduate of Oxford. England, and died in Logan County, Kentucky. Married five times, first, Lucy Thornton: second, Elizabeth, daughter of Gabriel Jones; third, Miss Jones; fourth, Mary Ann Fontaine, widow of Bowles Armistead; fifth, Mrs. Mercer, nee Carter.

V. Fielding Lewis5 (Fielding4, John2, John2, Robert1), fourth son of Col. Fielding Lewis. Married and died in Fairfax Co., Va., leaving no male issue. Issue:

38. I. Catherine Lewis8. Married Henry Chew Dade. 3!l. II. Lucinda Lewis5. Married Gilson Foote.

V. George W. Lewis5 (Fielding4, John2, John2, Robert1), seventh son of Col. Fielding, b. June 24, 1755. He was a captain in Colonel Baylor’s regiment of cavalry, during the Revolutionary War, and commander of General Washington’s life-guards. It is said that General Mercer expired in his arms at the battle of Princeton. Married Miss Daingerfield and lived in Clarke Co., Va.; died at his county seat, Marmion, in 1871. He enjoyed the highest confidence of General Washington and was sent by him on a secret expedition to Canada.

George Washington Lewis and Miss Daingerfield, his wife, had issue:

40. I. Mary Lewis”. Married Col. Byrd Willis. (See Willis Family, Chapter IX.)

41. II. Daingerfield Lewis”.

42. III. Samuel Lewis”.

43. IV. Bettie Lewis”, b. 1765. Married Charles Carter.

(See Carter Family, Chapter VII.)

V. Lawrence Lewis5 (Fielding4, John3, John2, Robert1), twelfth son of Colonel Fielding Lewis, b. 1767. He lived on his estate, Woodlawn, near Mount Vernon. He was the adopted son and executor of the will of General “Washington. Married Eleanor Parke Custis, daughter of Washington Parke Custis, adopted child of Mrs. Washington. They had issue:

44. I. Lorenzo Lewis”.

45. II. Lawrence Lewis”.

46. III. Frances Parke Lewis”.

47. IV. Washington Lewis”, lived in Clarke Co., Va. His descendants own many of the old family portraits, among them those of Col. Fielding Lewis and his second wife, Betty Washington. V. .Robert Lewis3 (Fielding4, John2, John2, Robert1), thirteenth son of Col. Fielding Lewis and Betty Washington, his second wife; was private secretary to General Washington during his presidential term. Married Miss Brown and settled in Fredericksburg, Va. Issue:

48. I. Daughter Lewis5. Married Rev. Edward McGuire of Fredericksburg, Va.

49. II. Daughter Lewis”. Married George W. Bassett, of Richmond, Va.

From Bishop Meade’s “Old Families”.we quote the following account:

Among the families who belonged to Pohick Church was that of Mr. Lawrence Lewis, nephew of General Washington. He married Miss Custis, the granddaughter of Mrs. Washington. In many of the pictures of the Washington family she may be seen as a girl in a group with the General, Mrs. Washington, and her brother. Washington Parke Custis. There were two full sisters, Mrs. Law and Mrs. Peter. Mrs. Custis, the widow of Washington Parke Custis, married second. Dr. David Stuart, first of Hope Parish and then of Ossian Hall, Fairfax Co., Va. One of the sons of Lorenzo Lewis married a daughter of Beverly Johnson, of Baltimore, Md.

John Lewis, Sr., one of the original brothers, who emigrated from Wales to America, was born about 1640. He lived with the Mastyns, an ancient and wealthy family of Denbighshire, Wales. He died in Hanover Co., Va., 1726, where his will can be found on record. This John Lewis, Sr., was the great-great-grandfather of William Terrill Lewis, of Louisville, Winston Co., Miss., author of the Lewis genealogy, from which the dates of this article have been largely drawn. In his will John Lewis mentions the names of his children:

2. I. Rebecca Lewis3.

3. II. Abraham Lewis3.

4. III. Sarah Lewis3.

5. IV. Angelica Lewis’2.

6. V. David Lewis3.

7. VI. John Lewis2.

II. David Lewis2 (John1), Sr., fifth son of John I/iwis, Sr., was born in Hanover Co., Va., about 1685. Married, first, Miss Terrill, by whom he had eight children.

William, James and John Terrill were brothers of AngloNorman descent. They came to America about 1660, as huntsmen for King James II, of England, and settled in Gloucester Co., Va. For their dexterity in hunting they wire awarded by the King fifteen hundred acres of land, to be selected by themselves. The Terrills are of Anglo-Norman origin and descend from Sir Walter Tyrell, a Norman knight who came into England with William the Conqueror, A. D. 1066. David Lewis, Sr., fifth child of the emigrant, moved from Hanover Co., Va., and settled in Albemarle. Co., Va., about 1750, where he died in 1779. He married twice and left eleven children. William Terrill Lewis3, the eldest child of David Lewis, Sr., b. 1718, Hanover Co., Va., moved to Albemarle Co., Va., and was the third settler in that county. William Lewis, Sr., was one of the first men who volunteered their services in Albemarle Co., Va., to resist the high-handed measures of Lord Dunmore in 1774.

IV. Col. Robert Lewis4 (John3, John2, Robert1), of Belvoir, Albemarle Co., Va., son of Major John Lewis3 and Frances Fielding Lewis, his wife. Married Jane, daughter of Nicholas Meriwether. He died in 1757, leaving five children. Issue: I. Robert Lewis”. II. John Lewis”.

III. Charles Lewis”.

IV. Nicholas Lewis5.
V. William Lewis”.

V. William Lewis5 (Robert4, John2, John2, L’obert1) was captain in the State line during the Revolution. Married Lucy Meriwether, daughter of Thomas Meriwether, by whom he had three children:

I. Meriwether Lewis”.
II. Reuben Lewis”.
III. Jane Lewis”.

VI. Meriwether Lewis” (William5, Robert4, John2, John2, Robert1), generally called the “Oregon Explorer,” son of Captain William I.ewis, b. August 18, 1774. His father died when he was very young and he grew up under the care of his uncle, Col. Nicholas Lewis. Thomas Jefferson gives a very interesting sketch of Meriwether Lewis, who was for two years his private secretary. He says: “He was remarkable, even in infancy, for enterprise, boldness and discretion. When only eight years old he habitually went out in the dead of the night alone with his dogs into the forest to hunt the raccoon and opossum. At the age of thirteen he was put to the Latin school and continued until eighteen.”

At the age of twenty he engaged as a volunteer in the body of militia called out by General Washington for service in the western part of the United States. At twenty-three he was promoted to a captaincy. In 1792 Thomas Jefferson proposed to the American Philosophical Society that they should set on foot a subscription to engage some competent person to explore the region by ascending the Missouri, crossing the Stony Mountains and descending the nearest river to the Pacific. Captain Lewis, being then stationed at Charlottesville, warmly solicited Jefferson to obtain for him the execution of the expedition, although it was explained to him that the person engaged to go should be accompanied by a single companion only, to avoid exciting alarm among the Indians. This did not deter him, but the proposal did not succeed. In 1803 Congress approved the plan and voted a man of money to carry it into execution. Captain Lewis, who had been private secretary for Jefferson for two years, renewed his solicitations to have the direction of the party. His request was granted, and as it was necessary that he should have some competent person with him, in case of accident to himself, William Clarke, brother of General Rogers Clarke, was selected and approved, receiving a commission as captain. In April. 1803, a draft of his instructions was sent to Captain Lewis, and on the 5th of July, 1803. they left Washington and proceeded to Pittsburg. The two explorers. Lewis and Clarke, returned to St. Louis on the 23d of September. 180(>. having been gone a little over three years. The old accounts of the expedition tell us, “Never did a similar event excite more joy throughout the United States.” Captain Lewis was soon after appointed Governor of Louisiana and Captain Clarke a general of its militia, and agent of the United States for Indian affairs in the department. Captain Meriwether Lewis died October 11. 1809, aged 35.

The Virginia ‘Heraldry gives (February 11, 1906): “There seems to have been some doubt for a time as to which of Col. Robert Lewis’ sons married Catherine Fauntleroy. Some genealogists stated that it was Robert, but it has been proved that he married his cousin, Frances Lewis.”

I believe that there is now a record of the marriage of John Lewis- and Catherine Fauntleroy in Washington. However that may be, there seems to be no doubt that John is the Lewis who married Catherine.

V. John Lewis5 (Robert4, John2, John2, Robert1), son of Col. Robert Lewis and Jane Meriwether, his wife. Married Catherine Fauntleroy, daughter of Col. William Fauntleroy, of Naylor’s Hole (he mentions his daughter Catherine Lewis in his will, dated 1757), and his wife, Apphia Bushrod, and great-granddaughter of Col. Moore Fauntleroy, who emigrated to America before 1C43. and who was the twenty-first generation of descent from Henry I, of France (Browning’s “Americans of Royal Descent”).

In Deed Book No. 5, of the Albemarle County Records (pp. 191, 192 and 299), he describes himself as “John Lewis, of Halifax Co., Va., in three separate deeds, in which his wife Catherine joins as party to same. He qualified as executor to his father’s will in 1766 (Albemarle records). He left Halifax and went to reside on the Dan River, in North Carolina.

John Lewis and Catherine Fauntleroy, his wife, had issue:
I. Sallie Lewis”, b. 1761. Married (Aug. 10, 1780) Philip
Taylor. Mr. Williams, of Asheville, N. C., has an old
prayer-book that belonged to Philip Taylor, an ancestor of his, which contains the record of the marriage and the fact of her being the daughter of John and Catherine Lewis.

II. Apphia Fauntleroy Lewis”. Married David Allen, who lived on the Dan River, five miles from Danville, Pittsylvania Co., Va. A great-aunt, who died only a few years ago, by name Apphia Lewis Hightower, gave the facts to my cousin, with the names of the children. She spent much of her time at the old plantation on the Dan River with her grandparents. Apphia Fauntleroy Lewis and her husband, David Allen, had issue: I. Lewis Buckner Allen7, b. 1773; d. July 20, 1835, at Hickory Flat, near Florence, Ala. Married Mary Catherine Jones, daughter of Richard C. Jones and Elizabeth Crowley Ward, of Amelia Co., Va.

II. Julius Allen7, a bachelor, who inherited the old home on the Dan River and afterward left it to his nephew. David Allen.

III. Fauntleroy Allen7.

IV. Felix Allen7. Married Margaret White.
V. Christian Allen7. Married Sallie Fortson.

VI. Sallie Fauntleroy Allen7. Married Joseph Woodson.
VII. David Bushrod Allen7, moved to Mississippi.
VIII. Marv Meriwether Allen7. Married John Ross.

VII. Lewis Buckner Allen7 and Mary Catherine Jones left issue:

I. Elizabeth Crowley Allen”, b. 1817; d. March 5, 1849,
Alabama. Married (April 3, 1834) Captain Clinton
Heslep.

II. William Ward Allen”. Married and moved to Texas.

III. Ann Catherine Allen”. Married John Donalson; descend

ants live in Aberdeen, Miss.

IV. John Lewis Allen8. Married Josephine Middlebrook.

V. Apphia Lewis Allen”. Married John Hightower; descendants live in Texas. VI. Richard Allen”, d. single. VIII. Elizabeth Crowley Allen” was b. 1817: d. March 5, 1849. Married (April 3, 1834) Captain Clinton Heslep, b. December 10, 1810, in West Calm, Pa., and was the son of Joseph Heslep and wife, Susan Kendig. Joseph Heslep moved to Kentucky in 1813 and then to Alabama. He was very wealthy, having developed the first iron works in that part of the country. His sister Hanna married Bernard Van Leer, and they were the ancestors of the Van Leers of Nashville, Tenn.

Elizabeth Crowley Allen and her husband, Captain Clinton Heslep. left issue:

I. Mary Cornelia Heslep”, b. 1835. at Hickory Flat, near
Florence, Ala.: d. at Florence, 1902. Married John
Hood. Issue:
I. James Hood1″.
II. Lizzie Hood1″. Married Harris.

III. John Hood1″, of the United States Navy.

IV. Chalmers Hood1″.
V. Cole Hood1″.

VI. Clinton Hood1″.
VII. Mary- Hood1″.
II. Christian Heslep”, b. 1837, Alabama; d. 1890, St. Louis.
Mo.

III. Lewis Buckner Heslep”, b. June 22, 1838, Alabama; d. June 1, 1905, St. Louis. Mo. Married (Nov. 22, 1860) Griselda A. Seat, in Trenton, Tenn., a daughter of Capt. Pobert Seat, and his wife, Martha Gilchrist. Martha Gilchrist was a daughter of Dr. Allen Gilchrist, whose father, Thomas Gilchrist, married Martha Jones, sister of Gen. Willie Jones and Gov. Allen Jones, of Revolutionary fame, in North Carolina. Dr. Allen Gilchrist’s sister, Griselda Gilchrist, married Col. William Polk, of Tennessee, who was the father of Gen. Leonidas Polk, of Civil War fame.

IV. Joseph Heslep”, b. May 1, 1842, Florence, Ala.

V. Clinton Heslep”, b. Sept. 11, 1843, at Brown’s Port.
Perry Co., Tenn.; d. in Florence, after Civil War.

IX. Lewis Buckner Heslep” and Griselda A. Seat, his wife, had issue:

I. Cornelia Sallie Heslep1″, b. March 1, 1862, Trenton,
Tenn. Married (Sept. 22, 1880, St. Louis. Mo.)

Robert G. Hogan, b. in England and nephew of Hon. John Hogan, of St. Louis, who represented that city in Congress, and was known by the sobriquet of “Honest John.” II. Vernon Benton Heslep1″, b. April 15, 1864, in Columbus. Ky.

III. Lewis Buekner Heslep1″, b. Feb. 4. 1867, Trenton. Tenn.

X. Cornelia S. Heslep1″ married Robert G. Hogan, and had issue:

L Reginald R. Hogan11, lieutenant in United States Marine
Corps, b. Dec. 21, 1881, St. Louis, Mo.
II. Hazel Heslep Hogan11, b. June 28, 1883, St. Louis.
Married (April 5, 1903, in St. Louis) Ephraim Brevard Cockrell, son of former United States Senator
Francis Marion Cockrell.

III. Robert Cecil Hogan11. b. July 26, 1S85, St. Louis.

IV. Gladys Griselda Hogan11, b. March 7, 1889, St. Louis.
V. George Vernon Hogan11. b. March 10, 1895, in Webster

Grove, St. Louis Co., Mo.

HON. THOMAS LEWIS.

Thomas Lewis2, the second son of the founder, was born in Donegal, Ireland, April 27, 1718; died January 31, 1790. He was a man of strong and cultivated mind, of spirit and enterprise, and during the colonial period and the Revolutionary War rendered important services to the country. In 1746 he was appointed colonial surveyor of Augusta, and much of Washington’s great wealth was acquired by surveys of land under his authority and in common with him. He and Col. John Wilson represented the county in the House of Burgesses almost uninterruptedly from 1745 to 1767, and they voted in 1765 for Patrick Henry’s celebrated resolutions declaring that “this general assembly have the only exclusive right and power to lay taxes and impositions u;:on the inhabitants of this colony; that any efforts in an opposite direction are illegal, unconstitutional and unjust, and have a manifest tendency to destroy British as well as American freedom.”

In 1775 he was unanimously elected delegate to the Colonial Congress, and was one of the first to enroll his name among the “Sons of Liberty.” He was commissioner of the old confederacy of the thirteen colonies in 1778, to treat with the Indian tribes at the battle of Point Pleasant. He was a member of the convention which ratified the constitution of the United States.

After the Revolution, Gen. Washington made him a visit at Lewiston, in Rockingham, and there arranged their land claims. His descendants still own and reside upon his estate, Lewiston, near Port Republic, in the present county of Rockingham. He had a literary taste, and when not engaged in business was generally to be found in his library. He died at his residence in Rockingham County, on the Shenandoah River, three miles from Port Republic, January 31, 1790. In his will he fixed the place on his own estate where he wished to be buried, and desired that the burial service might be read from the Book of Common Prayer by his friend Peachy Gilmer. Married (January 26, 1749) Jane. the daughter of William Strother, Esq., of Stafford Co., Va., whose estate, opposite to Fredericksburg, joined the residence of the father of Gen. Washington, with whom (Gen. W.) she was a schoolmate and nearly of the same age.

Hon. Thomas Lewis2 and Jane Strother, his wife, had issue:

14. XII. Sophia Lewis3, b. 1775. Married John Carthrae, of Rockingham Co., Va.; removed to Missouri. Issue unknown.

15. XIII. William Benjamin Lewis2, b. 1778. Married Miss Hite, and at’ his death, 1842, left issue:

16. I. William H. Lewis4. Married Elizabeth, daughter of Capt. John Lewis, of Bath Co. Issue unknown.

17. II. Gen. George Lewis4. Married Miss Effinger.

18. III. Mary Jane Lewis4.

III. Margaret Ann Lewis3 (Thomas2, John1), b. 1751. Married MeClenahan. of Staunton, Va., by whom she left one child:

19. I. John MeClenahan4.

Her husband dying, she afterwards married Col. Wm. Bowyer, of Staunton, by whom at her death, in 1834, she left issue:

20. II. William C. Bowyer4.

21. III. Strother Bowyer4.

22. IV. Luke Bowyer4.

23. V. Peter C. Bowyer4.

24. VI. Matilda Bowyer4.

III. Agatha Lewis3 (Thomas-, John1), daughter of Col. Thomas Lewis and Jane Strother, his wife, b. 1753; d. 1836, aged 83. Married, first, Capt. Frogg, d. leaving one daughter; she left one daughter.

Agatha Lewis married, second, Col. John Stuart, of Greenbrier Co., Va., by whom she left issue:

25. 1. Elizabeth Frogg4, b. 1773. Issue by second marriage:

26. II. Charles A. Stuart4, b. 1775.

27. III. Lewis Stuart4, b. 1777.

28. IV. Margaret Stuart4, b. 1779.

29. V. Jane Stuart4, b. 17—.

I shall complete the Stuart lineage before taking up Charles Lewis’s branch:

IV. Elizabeth Frogg4 (Agatha3, Thomas-, John1), daughter of Agatha Lewis and Capt. Frogg. .Married Major Isaac Estill, of Monroe Co. and left issue.
30. I. Wallace Estill’.

31. II. John Estill”.

32. III. Estill”.

33. IV. Agnes Estill”.

IV.- Charles A. Stuart4 (Agatha Lewis2, Thomas2, John1), son of Agatha Lewis and John Stuart, of Greenbrier Co., Va. Married Miss Robertson, of Augusta Co., Va., and had following issue:

34. I. Robertson Stuart5. Married Miss Bradford, of Orange, Va.

35. II. James Stuart”. Married Margaret Lewis. Issue unknown.

36. III. Elizabeth Stuart5, single.

IV. Lewis Stuart4 (Agatha Lewis2, Thomas2, John1), son of Agatha Lewis and Col. John Stuart, b. 1777. Married Sarah Lewis and had issue:

37. 1. Rachael Stuart”. Married Gen. Davis, Mississippi.

38. II. Jane Stuart5. Married Samuel Price.

39. III. Agnes Stuart”. Married Charles L. Peyton.

40. IV. Charley Stuart5, unmarried.

41. V. Margaret Stuart”. Married James Davis.

42. VI. Lewis Stuart5, unmarried.

43. VII. Henry Stuart5, unmarried.

44. VIII. Andrew Stuart5, unmarried.

[V. Margaret Stuart4 (Agatha Lewis2, Thomas2, John1), daughter of Agatha Lewis and Col. John Stuart, b. 1779. Married Col. Andrew Lewis,* of Point Pleasant, 1802; he d. 1833, leaving issue:

45. I. Agnes Lewis5, b. 1805.

46. II. John Lewis5, b. 1807 ; d. 1811.

47. III. Elizabeth Lewis5, b. ;d. 1812.

48. IV. Mary J. Lewis5, b. 1811. Married Charles R. Baldwin in 1833; d. 1835.

49. V. John Stuart Lewis”.

50. VI. Margaret Lewis5, b ;d. 1819.

*note.—Col. Andrew Lewis3 (Charles3, John1) was son of Col. Charles Lewis and Sarah Murray.

51. VII. Sarah Frances Lewis5, b. 1817. Married Dr. Creigh.

of Lewisburg, W. Va. Issue unknown.

52. VIII. Elizabeth Lewis5, b. 1819.

53. IX. Andrew Lewis5, el. young.

IV. Jane Stuart4 (Agatha Lewis2, Thomas2, John1), daughter of Agatha Lewis and Col. John Stuart, b. 17—. Married Major Robert Crockett, of Wythe Co., W. Va., and left the following

Maria Crockett5. Married Judge James E. Brown.
Agatha Crockett”. Married James McGavoc, and
left issue.

Charles Crockett”. Married Mary Bowyer, of Botetourt and left issue.
Stuart Crockett”. Married Margaret Taylor, of Smyth Co., and left issue.

Frank Crockett”. Married .

Gustavus Crockett”. Married Eliza Erskine.
Augustine Crockett3, d. unmarried.

V. Agatha Estill5 (Elizabeth4, Agatha Lewis2, Thomas2, John1), daughter of Elizabeth Frogg and Major Isaac Estill. Married Henry Erskine of Greenbrier and had issue:

Elizabeth Erskine8. Married Gustavus Crockett.
Margaret Lewis Erskine”. Married Charles S. Gay, of Richmond, Va., who removed to Augusta Co.,
Va., and had issue:
Charles Gay7, killed in battle Malvern Hill.
Fanny Gay7. Married Richard M. Catlett, a lawyer of Staunton, Va.
Elizabeth Gay7.
Erskine Gay7, unmarried.
Agatha Gay7.
William Gay7.

Carrie Gay7. Married W. M. Allen, of Staunton, Va.
Margaret Gay7, d. young.
William Lewis Gay7, d. young.
John Robertson Gay7, d. young.

Jane Erskine8. Married William Boyd, a lawyer of Buchanan, in Botetourt Co., Va., and had issue

“4. I. Henry Boyd7.

75. II. Alice Boys Boyd7.

76. III. William Boyd7.

77. IV. Andrew Boyd7.

V. Rachel Stuart5 (Lewis4, Agatha Lewis3. Thomas2, John1), daughter of Lewis Stuart and Sarah Lewis, his wife. Married Gen. Davis, of Mississippi, and had issue:

78. I. Runnels Davis5.

79. II. Charles Davis5.

80. III. Sarah Davis”.

81. IV. Mary Davis”.

82. V. Alfred Davis”.

83. VI. Davis”.

84. VII. Davis”.

V. Jane Stuart5 (Lewis4, Agatha Lewie3, Thomas2, John1), daughter of Lewis Stuart and Sarah Lewis, his wife. Married Samuel Price, of Lewisburg, W. Va., formerly Lieutenant-Governor of Virginia and in 1876 United States Senator for West Virginia, and at her death, in 187:I. left issue:

85. I. Margaret Price”.

86. II. Mary Price”.

87. III. John Price”.

88. IV. Sally Price”.

89. V. Jennie Price”.

90. VI. Lewis Price”.

V. Agnes Stuart5 (Lewis4, Agatha Lewis2, Thomas2, John1), daughter of Lewis Stuart and Sarah Lewis, his wife. Married Charles L. Peyton, son of C. Peyton and a great nephew of President Jefferson, of Greenbrier Co., W. Va., and had issue:

91. I. Thomas Peyton”.

92. II. Elizabeth Peyton”.

93. III. Lewis Peyton”.

94. IV. Charles Peyton”.

95. V. Harry Peyton”.

96. VI. Caroline Peyton”.

V. Maria Crockett” (Jane Stuart4. Agatha Lewis2, Thomas2, John1), daughter of Jane Stuart and Major Robert Crockett, of Wythe Co., Va. Married Judge James E. Brown, by whom she had issue:

97. I. William Brown”, d. unmarried.

98. II. Jane Brown”, d. unmarried.

99. III. Fanny Peyton Brown”. Married Col. Joseph F.

Kent. She d. 1861, leaving issue: I. Betty Kent7. Married George M. Harrison.

II. John Kent7, unmarried.

III. Jane Kent7. Married Howe Peyton Cochran.

IV. Emma Kent7. Married Jno. 0. Yates.
V. Alexander Kent7, d. unmarried.

After the death (1861) of Mrs. Kent, Col. Joseph F. Kent
married, second, Virginia Frances Peyton, b. 1841. Issue:
I. Joseph Kent7.
II. Susan Peyton Kent7.

III. Mary Preston Kent7.

II. Susan Peyton Kent7. Married (6th of January, 1904) by Rev. Mercer P. Logan, D. D., at St. John’s Episcopal Church, Wytheville, Va., to Mr. Edmund Fontaine Broun, of Charleston, W. Va.*

IV. Alexander Brown, fourth child of Judge Brown, was a most promising young man, who, after graduating with distinction at the University of Virginia, commenced the law practice in Wythe, hut died soon after.

The Baltimore Sun of August 13, 1905, has the following article on:

THE OLD HOME OF NELLY CUSTIS.

Of the many old Colonial Homes in Virginia which are still in a splendid state of preservation, perhaps none can claim greater historical interest or more pleasing associations than does old Woodlawn Mansion, the

‘Being in Wytheville that winter I (L. Pecquet du Bellet) was at the wedding. I was at the reception and handed all the telegrams of congratulations to the bride and groom. A lovelier bride I have never seen. The parlors were crowded with guests from various States of the Union. The presents were very handsome, costing several thousand dollars.

The mother of the bride is a very dear friend of mine. I receive some very interesting letters from her. (Peyton Family, Hayden’s Virginia Genealogies, pp. 461-566.)

original home of Mrs. Eleanor Custis Lewis, nee Nelly Custis, the adopted daughter of General George Washington. Since Woodlawn was built one hundred years have rolled into the great abyss of the past, yet it stands to day a complete and solid result of fine old-time architecture, in no respect reduced from its ancient splendor or magnificence.

Woodlawn is located in lower Fairfax County, lying directly on the road known as the Alexandria pike, and an hour’s drive from that old city of Alexandria, where centers so much of history, sentiment and anecdote concerning America’s greatest general, the illustrious Washington. The commanding site upon which this mansion is built was formerly a part of the Mount Vernon estate, but, with the acres surrounding it. was given by General Washington to his adopted daughter, Nelly Custis, upon her marriage to his favorite nephew, Lawrence. Lewis, afterwards Major Lewis of Woodlawn. Its architecture is of Colonial date, being one of the finest specimens of that period and better known as the Georgian architecture. Within the long drawing-room of that historic mansion, on the last anniversary of the birthday of her devoted foster-father. Nelly was made the bride of Lawrence Lewis, Washington himself giving the blushing young beauty away to the beloved nephew, afterwards Major Lewis, of Woodlawn. This event took place on the 22nd of February. 1799. Mrs. Eleanor Custis Lewis sleeps to-day beneath the marble shaft that marks her grave at Mount Vernon, only a few feet away from the tomb containing the honored dust of her beloved hero and foster-father. Upon this monument the noble traits of this gentlewoman are thus written:

“Sacred to the memory of Eleanor Parke Custis. granddaughter of Mrs. Washington and adopted daughter of General Washington. Reared under the roof of the Father of His Country, this lady was not more remarkable for her beauty of person than for the superiority of her mind. She lived to be admired and died to be regretted, July 15. 1852, in the seventyfourth year of her age.”

Woodlawn has changed owners many times, and is the property to-day of Mr. Paul Kester, the popular young playwright.

Since writing the above I am the happy recipient of the following extract from Mrs. Penrose N. Ions, of San Angelo, Texas, taken from the “History of Huguenots,” by Samuel Smiles:

Jean Louis was forced to flee from France, during the persecutions of the Huguenots, which followed the revocation of the “Edict of Nantes.” He came of a Protestant family of wealth, position and influence, of the town of Castred. He made good his escape to England, and as the English were in need of experienced officers in Flanders, he was gladly weleomed and given a commission as Captain in Queen Anne’s Army in the “Low Countries.” For his gallantry and valuable services he was made Field Marshal, Earl of Ligenter and Baron of Greniskilin.

He was with Marlborough in Flanders, and attracted his attention at the storming of Liege. At Blenheim he was the only captain of hisregiment who survived. At Kenice (or Menice) he led the grenadiers in storming the counters. He fought at Malplaquet. where he was made Major of Brigade. He was in all of Marlborough’s battles, and at Dettingen as Lieutenant-General, he won still higher distinction. The intrepidity with which he led the British Infantry won the battle of Fontenoy. Placed in command of the British forces in Flanders, he was taken prisoner at the engagement of Sanfield. Restored to England he was made Commander-in-Chief, and Colonel of the Fort Guards. During his career, he was in nineteen battles and twenty-three sieges.

GENERAL JOHN LEWIS.

The first General John Lewis had a son- named :he was the eldest and died early. He had rented in fee simple, for a hundred years, the estate of Lord Dunraven, in Ireland. John Lewis, the eldest son of the dead man, succeeded to the titles and estates and settled in Ireland. That John Lewis went to Scotland and married Margaret, the daughter of Lord Lynn, who lived on Loch (Lake) Lynn.

John Lewis, then an earl, and his wife lived happily for a few years. Then the profligate Earl of Dunraven wanted to give (rent) the estate to a boon companion. He came with an armed hand to drive John Lewis away. He fired into the house and killed a brother of Lewis, who was ill in bed. John Lewis, who had been absent, returned, and, seeing the armed Earl, he shot him dead. English soldiers were sent to arrest John Lewis for killing the Earl of Dunraven, but the Irish of the whole country arose and helped him to escape to the west coast. All the landlords near John Lew-is armed their followers and escorted him to the coast, and he escaped to France. Feeling unsafe in France, he made his way alone and on foot over to the mountains in Spain. Relatives knelt to King George and begged a pardon for John Lewis. As he was safe in Spain and the King could not get him, he thought to make good use of him and try to get the Indians to kill him, so he (the King) said John Lewis should lose titles and property, but if he would go to Virginia, and go far beyond all of his good subjects, he (the King) would forgive and rent him a tract of land, 100,000 acres, provided he built a fort and became a shield to all of his good and loyal subjects. So, as he could not help himself, John Lewis came to Virginia. His brother brought over the family of John Lewis and a shipload of tenants—MeHughs (now called MeCuea) and McLungs and many other Valley families, all Presbyterians. As soon as they got to Virginia they were on a level with John Lewis.

John Lewis had the following children: Samuel, Thomas, Andrew, William, Margaret Anne, Charles and Alice. Alice married Mr. Madison and was the mother of Bishop Madison. Mr. Madison was the first and only member of the family to belong to the Protestant Episcopal Church.

Thomas Lewis married Jane Strother. His sketch has been given above.

II. Col. Charles Lewie2 (John1), the youngest son of the founder, John Lewis, and Margaret Lynn, his wife; was killed October 10, 1774, at the battle of Point Pleasant. Married Sarah Murray, an English lady, half-sister of Col. Cameron, of Bath Co., Va. She was a near relative of Linlev Murray, who wrote the grammar.

Col. Charles Lewis left following issue:

3. L Elizabeth Lewis2, b. 1762 : d. single.

4. II. Margaret Lewis2, b. 1765.

5. III. John Lewis2, b. 1766.

6. IV. Marv Lewis2, b. 1768.

7. V. Thomas Lewis2, b. 1771.

8. VI. Andrew Lewis2, b. 1772.

9. VII. Charles Lewis2, b. 1774.

III. Col. John Lewis3 (Charles2, John1), son of Col. Charles Lewis and Sarah Murray, his wife, of Bath Co., Va. Married Rachel Miller, of Augusta Co., and left at his death, 1843. the following issue:

16. VII. John Lewis4. Married Mary J.’Lewie, daughter of

William Benjamin Lewis, of Rockingham Co., Va., and Miss Hite. W. B. Lewis’ was youngest son of Thomas Lewis2 and Jane Strother. Issue unknown.

17. VIII. Elizabeth Lewis4. Married Wm. H. Lewis, son of

Wm. Benjamin Lewis and M. Hite. Issue unknown.

18. IX. Hannah Lewis4, unmarried.

19. X. Rachel Lewis4, d. unmarried.

III. Charles Lewis3 (Thomas3. John1), son of Thomas Lewis2 and Jane Strother, his wife; b. 1772; d. 1832, near Port Republic. Rockingham Co., Va. Married Anne Hance. of the Eastern Shore of Maryland. PTe inherited the homestead on the Shenandoah River in what is now Rockingham Co., Va. Charles Lewis and Anne Hance had issue:

I. Thomas Lewis4. Married Delia Fletcher. Issue:
I. Anne Lewis”.
IF. Samuel Hance Lewis4.

III. Charles Chambers Lewis4. Married Mary Allen and had
following issue:
I. Charles Chambers Lewis”.
II. James Lewis”.

III. Andrew Lewis”.

IV. Mary Lewis”.

V. Henry Clay Lewis”. VI. William Lewis”. VII. George Kemper Lewis”. IV. Mary Lewis4. Married Dr. Nusco Chambers, of Clinton Co., Ohio.

V. Margaret Strother Lewis4. Married Rev. C. B. Tippett, of Maryland.

IV. Gen. Samuel Hance Lewis4 (Charles2, Thomas2, John1), son of Charles Lewis3 and Anne Hance, a prominent citizen of Virginia, was a graduate of Washington College (now Washington and Lee), a man of great literary tastes, profoundly religious, of high moral worth, and beloved friend of Bishops Meade and Cobb. While exceedingly genial among his intimate friends, he was a man remarkable for his strict religious observances, for his stern deportment in the presence of frivolity, and for his iron will and high integrity, both in private as well as in public life. He represented his county in the Legislature for many years, and his name is dear to the church in Virginia, in whose councils he was so long a ruling spirit. He died at his home, Lewiston, Rockingham Co., of cancer of the neck, in 1868.

He married, first, Nancy Lewis, the granddaughter of Col. Charles Lewis, killed at the battle of Point Pleasant; second. Anna Maria Lomax, daughter of Judge J. T. Lomax, of Fredericksburg, Va.; third, Mrs. Fry. No issue by this marriage.

Issue by first marriage:

I. Charles H. Lewis”, United States Minister to Portugal. 1873. Married a daughter of Judge Lomax and had issue of one daughter. TI. John Francis Lewis”.

III. Samuel H. Lewis5. Married a Miss Dabney.

IV. Elizabeth Lewis5. Married Rev. J. C. Wheat.
V. Mary Lewis5, d. unmarried.

VI. Anne Lewis5, d. unmarried.
VII. Margaret Lynn Lewis5, d. unmarried.
VIII. William Meade Lewis5, d. unmarried.
Issue by second marriage:

IX. Charlotte Lewis5. Married Beverly Botts and has issue.

X. Lunsford Lomax Lewis5.
XL Cornelia Lewis5, d. unmarried.
XII. Anne Maria Lewis5, d. unmarried.

V. John Francis Lewis5 (Samuel4, Charles’, Thomas2, John1), second son of Gen. Samuel Hance Lewis and Nancy Lewis, his first wife. He inherited all of his father’s sterling qualities, and was one of the leading men of his day in Virginia. Of magnificent physical proportions—six feet three inches tall—his mental attributes were quite as remarkable. He was especially noted for his reckless bravery, his impulsive denunciation of wrong, and his utter disregard for public opinion when he considered it to be in error. His first appearance in public life was when he was sent as delegate to the convention at the outbreak of the Civil War, which was to decide whether Virginia would secede from the Union or not. He was a strong Union man and went there instructed to vote against secession, which he did to the bitter end, saying they might hang him, as they threatened to do. but he would never sign the ordinance. He was the only man in this convention who did not sign it. There were several of the West Virginia members, who did not sign, but they left at once for their homes within the Northern line. A hundred times the ordinance was thrust into his face, but he invariably replied, “I will die first.” That he was not killed seems almost a miracle. Many of the best and staunchest Union men gave way to the pressure and signed the ordinance. Samuel McDowel More was burned in effigy, Jubal A. Early was threatened with mob law, yet they both yielded to the overwhelming excitement. John F. Lewis alone remained at his post, true to the last to his firm conviction that to do so would bring trouble and ruin to his State. His integrity and honesty of purpose were so well known and so well appreciated that they seemed to be a shield to his open and often reckless Union utterances, and while others were imprisoned, or shot down on the roadside, he was spared to save his State from the internal strife which so long retarded the happiness and prosperity of many of the more southern states. In 1869 he was elected Lieutenant Governor, and in November of that year was elected to the United States Senate. To quote from Rev. 0. S. Bunting, late of Petersburg, Va., and a dear friend: “From heel to crown he was every inch a man—brave, true, sincere, courteous in the truest sense, generous, positive. Agree with him some did not, but admire him all must. All over the State he was honoured as extremely few public men ever were.” He was born 1818. Married (October 26. 1842) Serena Helen Sheffey. b. 1823, daughter of the Hon. Daniel Sheffey, of Staunton. Va. They had issue:

I. Daniel Sheffey Lewis”, b. Oct. 17, 1843. Married Isabella Botts, daughter of Hon. John Minor Botts, of Richmond, Va. Issue:
I. Minor Botts Lewis7.
II. John F. Lewis7.
III. Daniel Sheffey Lewis7.
IV. Beverley Lewis7.

V. Lunsford Lewis7.
VI. Archie Lewis7.
II. Nannie Lewis”, b. 1845. Married Hon. John Ambler Smith, of Dinwiddie Co., Va. Their descendants are in Volume I, Chapters VI and VII.

III. Maria Hanson Lewis5, b. 1848. Married Penrose N. Ions,

of Fairfax, Va. No issue. Mr. Ions, agent Insurance Co., Hartford, Conn. They reside San Angelo. Texas.

IV. Serena Helen Lewis5, b. 1850. Married Lewis Stuart Davis, of Greenbrier. W. Va. No issue.

V. Mary Louise Lewis5, b. Sept. 16, 1857. Married Dr. Edwin Gibbs, of Lexington, Va. Issue:
I. John Lewis Gibbs7.
II. Nannie Lewis Gibbs7.

VI. John Francis Lewis”, b. Sept. 6, 1860. Married (Jan. 10,
1883) Anna Harnsberger, b. Dec. 1, 1861. They reside at Lynwood, Va., and have issue:
I. Helen Lewis7, b. Sept, 8, 1888.

II. Hanson Lewis7, b. May 11, 1893.

III. Anna Lewis7, b. May 4, 1896.

IV. Katherine Stuart Lewis7, b. April 26, 1898.

VII. Samuel Hance Lewis5, b. March 9, 1869. Married Editha Clay, of Lynchburg, ATa. Issue: 1. Samuel Hance Lewis7.

Daniel Sheffey Lewis5, oldest son of the late Hon. John F. Lewis5 and Serena Helen Sheffey, his wife, b. October 17, 1843, graduated from the Law Department of the University of Virginia in the year 1867. Married Isabella McLaine, youngest daughter of the late Hon. John Minor Botts. In 1876 he was the Republican candidate for Congress in the Fifth Congressional District of Virginia and was defeated by the Hon. George G. Cabell, of Danville, Va. In 1882 was appointed by President Arthur United States District Attorney for the Western District of Virginia, which place Mr. Lewis held until President Cleveland came into office, when he was removed to make way for the Hon. H. C. Allen, of Woodstock.

In 1886 he bought the Spirit of the VcUley, a newspaper published in Harrisonburg, Va., which he has published up to the present date (1906). For sixteen years he held the position of treasurer of the town of Harrisonburg and was reelected on June 14, 1904.

V. Samuel Hance Lewis5 (Samuel4. Charles8, Thomas3. John1), third son of Gen. Samuel Hance Lewis and Nancy Lewis. his first wife. Married Louisa Dabney. Issue:

I. Lucy Lewis”.
IL. Sal lie Lewis”.

III. Elizabeth Lewis”.

IV. Ellen Lewis”.

V. Samuel Hance Lewis”. Married (Dee. 1900) Agnes

de Leon Moses. Issue: I. Margaret Lynn Lewis7.

VI. John E. Walter Lewis”.
VII. Charles Lewis5.

VIII. Harry Lewis”.
IX. Sue Lewis”.

V. Elizabeth Rachel Lewis5 (Samuel4, Charles2, Thomas2, John1), duaghter of Gen. Samuel Hance Lewis and Nancy Lewis, his first wife. Married Rev. James Clinton Wheat. They have issue:

[. Dr. Samuel Lewis Wheat5, d. Dec., 1903. Married (1886)

Ella Rutherford. She came from Scotland. Issue: I. Elizabeth Lewis Wheat7, b. Oct, 27, 1887. I [. James Clinton Wheat7, b. Feb., 1888.

III. Frances Rutherford Wheat7, b. , 1889.

II. John Wheat”.

III. Eleanor C. Wheat5. She lives at the old home of Gen.

Samuel Hance Lewis, Lynwood, Rockingham Co., Va.

IV. James Clinton Wheat5. Married (June, 1895) Gertrude

Ross, daughter of J. M. Ross, of U. S. A. Issue:
I. Clarence Ross Wheat7. Mr. Wheat resides in Atlanta,
Ga.

Issue by second marriage, Anna Maria Lomax:
V. Charlotte Thornton Lewis”, daughter of Gen. Samuel H.
Lewis. Mamed Beverley B. Botts, son of Hon. John
Minor Botts.

VI. Lunsford Lomax Lewis5.

VII. Cornelia J. Lewis”, b. 1847; d. 1871.
VIII. Anna Maria Lewis5. Married Charles Maurice Smith,
of Richmond. Va. (Descendants Volume I, Chapters
VI and VII.)

V. Charlotte Thornton Lewis5 (Samuel4, Charles2, Thomas2, John1), daughter of Gen. Samuel H. Lewis and Anna Maria Lomax, his second wife. Married Beverley B. Botts, son of Hon. John Minor Botts. They have issue: I. Anna Lewis Botts”. II. Mary Beverley Botts”, b. Nov. 7, 1869, Culpeper Co., Va. Married (June 28, 1899, in Washington, D. C.) John Minor Botts Hoxey, b. April 17, 1869, Paterson, New Jersey. Issue: I. John Minor Botts Hoxey7, Jr., b. April 25, 1900, Brooklyn, N. Y.

II. Dorothea Douglas Hoxey, b. Jan. 26, 1903, Brooklyn, N. Y.; d. Feb. 6, 1903. V. Judge Lunsford Lewis5 (Samuel4, Charles3, Thomas2, John1) , son of Gen. Samuel Hance Lewis and Anna Maria Lomax, his second wife; he was Republican nominee for Governor of Virginia during the fall of 1905. Married, first, Rose Botts. daughter of John Minor Botts; second, Miss Jane Looney, of Memphis, Tenn.

I met Mrs. Lewis in Richmond, Va., June, 1904. To her kind and gracious invitation I am indebted for spending a delightful evening at the Woman’s Club. I had the pleasure of meeting Mrs. Stonewall Jackson the same evening. I met Mrs. Lewis several times during my visit in Richmond, and she was always as courteous as any lady I had the pleasure of meeting at the Capital City of the Old Dominion.

At the Woman’s Club I was introduced to Mrs. Willford. She pressed my hands and remarked: “You must be the daughter of Catherine Ambler Moncure. 1 visited her during my wedding tour in Paris, France, and remember seeing you as a child.”

Judge Lunsford Lomax Lewis and Rose Botts, his first wife, have issue:

I. Minor Lewis”. II. Mary Willer Lewis”. I have had some very interesting letters from Miss Lewis. III. Samuel Hance Lewis”.

The Davis Family of Maryland, Virginia, and Wales

Davis’s of Maryland Coat of Arms from Side Lights of Maryland History 1904

Arms — Sable, three nag's heads, heads erased argent
Crest — A wolf salient argent

My modernized version of the Coat of Arms

The Welsh Davises derive their descent, according to the best authorities, from the Prince of Powis, the opponent of Ethelfrid, King of Northumberland, at the battles of Chester and Bangor, about the commencement of the seventh century. Nineteenth in descent from Prince Brachwel of Powis was Meilir Gryg, direct ancestor of David, son of John ap David of Llivior, who, according to the Welsh custom, assumed the modern surname of Davies in the year 1637 when signing a deed of family settlement.

Note: I will add the connecting genealogy when I get the time.

English authorities, claim that this Welsh line can be traced back to those brave Britons who lined the coast of Kent to oppose the landing of Julius Caesar, but the record as given starts a few centuries before the Norman Conquest, beginning with Prince Rhodri “Molwynog,” the cognomen meaning ” Welsh blood being up.” He settled on the north of the Severn after his removal from Cambrian Wessex, where many of the Britons who preferred liberty to the foreign yoke followed their chief.

His great-grandson, Rhodri Mawr, or “the great,” divided Wales into three distinct royalties for his three eldest sons, Cadell, Avarawd and Mervyn,

The Davises of Welsh origin, of Hope and Marsh, in Shropshire, England, bear the following arms :
Arms — A goat argent, horned or, standing on a child of the same, swaddled gules, and feeding on a tree eradicated vert, a crescent for difference.

Crest — On a mount vert a goat couchant argent, under a tree proper.

This line descends from David, whose son Hugh ap David (Davis) of Hope had a son William ap Hugh, whose heir Jeuan ap William of Hope married Alson, daughter of John Hewes.

He was succeeded by David ap Jeuan, of Marshe, in com. Salop, who married Eliun, daughter of John Williams.

Reynold Davys, the son and heir, married Ellen, daughter of James Morris, who had sons Edward and James Davis. Of these, James married Miss Martyn and had a son, John Davis.

Although the late George Lachlin Davis stated in his account of the early emigrants that the Davises of Mount Hope did not leave the principality of Wales until after 1720, we find an early Davis, with the very suggestive Welsh name of Evan Davis, receiving a patent for 200 acres of land on the Severn in the year 1672.

The similarity of the names of their estates would suggest that the Davises of Hope in Great Britain were forebears of the Davises of Mount Hope in Maryland. This is an interesting point for further investigation.

Whether or not the various original settlers of this name came from Wales originally does not concern us.

The Davis name has been prominent in the annals of Maryland ever since the days of the first notable assembly whose records have been preserved to us, for in the year 1637 John Davis sat as a representative for St. Marie’s Hundred, while the several successive years Thomas Davis contributed his services in molding the foundations of our government.

These early members of the Davis family in Maryland were from Virginia, and probably sons of James Davis, of Henrico, Gentleman, who came to Virginia in the good ship George in the year 1617. The records show that several of the Davises came from the Old Dominion into Maryland, and were perhaps kinsmen of Sir William Davis, of Bristol, England, to whom letters from Virginia are still extant.

America_Pinnace_Virginia_1584_artist

After the resurvey between Maryland and Virginia, lands in Somerset county were granted these two brothers by the Lord Baltimore, their estates being previously on the Accomac side. His Lordship’s rent rolls show that 7,000 acres in Somerset county alone were patented to members of the Davis family.

On both sides of the Chesapeake members of this distinguished name were large landholders and lived in the lavish way peculiar to the Colonial gentry. The Davis men were from earliest times conspicuous in the military affairs of the Province. In the year 1667 we find Capt. Hopkins Davis commanding a company of foote (soldiers) in Choptank and Miles river, Talbot county, and Capt. John Davis, of the same county, martialling his men against attack. Among the men of this name who were paid by the Assembly of Maryland for public services to the Province prior to 1685 were George Davis, Griffith Davis, John Davis, Thomas Davis, William Davis, Samuel Davis and Jonas Davis.

In the year 1694 John Davis was appointed commissioner and justice of the peace for trial and cause for Talbot county, of which he was also a military officer.

While it has been claimed that the Western Shore Davises did not arrive in Maryland until much later than those on the Eastern Shore, the Colonial records disprove this, as above shown. As early as 1694 John Davis was a justice of Prince George’s county. The names of Samuel and John Davis appear in a list of loyal subjects in Somerset county in 1689, in which year a petition for a Protestant government was addressed to the King. While the Davis men filled with fidelity many civil offices of importance and served their government on the Colonial field, including the French and Indian wars, it is especially notable for the large number of commissioned officers in the Revolutionary service.

Among these were Col. Richard Davis, 1778 ;
Capt. John Davis, Snow Hill Battalion 1777 ;
Capt. Phillip Davis, Thirteenth Battalion, Kent county, 1778 ;
Capt. Richard Davis, of Washington county ;
Capt. John Davis, of Wicomico Battalion ;
First Lieutenant Nixon Davis,
First Lieutenant Jesse Davis, of Worcester county, 1776 ;
First Lieutenant Amos Davis, of Washington county, 1778 ;
First Lieutenant Lodowich Davis and Second Lieutenant Griffith Davis, Middle Battalion, Montgomery county ;
First Lieutenant James Davis, of Dorchester county ;
Philemon Davis, a sergeant in the mounted company that marched from Queen Anne’s county February 3, 1776 ;
Lieut. Col. Richard Davis, of Frederick county troops, 1776 ;
Ensign Rezin Davis, of Frederick, 1776 ;
Second Lieutenant Richard Davis, Baltimore county, 1776 ;
Ensign Alexander Davis, commissioned second lieutenant August, 1777 ;
Ensign William Davis, Baltimore Battalion, 1777 ;
Richard Davis, of Washington county, appointed to purchase provisions for the United States Army, 1778 ;

Robert Paine Davis, ensign of Capt. Thomas Watkins’ company, on West river, in Anne Arundel county, 1779. There were other officers and no less than 50 privates by the name of Davis who served in the Maryland troops during the War of Independence.

While from the foregoing we can have no doubt as to the patriotic blood of the Davis men, yet more than once the name is enrolled among those who held the scales of justice, and while so many of the family were giving their lives to their country’s service Samuel Davis, of Kent, and Richard Davis, of Washington county, were filling the honorable and important office of justice of the county courts in the year 1778.

In the journal of the Council of safety reference is made to Captain Davis as “sea commander.” While one of the early rectors of William and Mary Parish was Thomas Davis, we find Rev. Samuel Davis preaching to the early Presbyterian flock in Somerset county, where his name is still revered as one who helped to plant the vine in the virgin soil of the New World.

The various branches of the Davis family in Maryland intermarried with the other representative Colonial families, and particularly is this the case in the branch in Anne Arundel county. Here we find Richard Davis marrying Ruth Warfield, daughter of John Warfield and his wife, Ruth Gaither, whose ancestors first settled in Virginia and took part in the affairs of that colony. The children of this marriage of Richard Davis and Ruth Warfield were Richard, John, Thomas, Caleb, Elizabeth and Ruth Davis. Caleb Davis arrived at man’s estate, like others of his family, in time to fight in the Revolutionary War. He married Lucretia Griffith, daughter of Orlando Griffith and his wife, Katharine Howard, daughter of Capt. John Howard, Jr., and Katharine Greenbury. Ruth Davis, sister of Caleb Davis, married Joshua Warfield, the son of Benjamin. Elizabeth Davis married John Marriott.

Other marriages of Davises with well-known families was that of Ephraim Davis to Elizabeth Howard ; Allen Bowie Davis and Rebecca Comfort Dorsey, daughter of Chief Justice Thomas Beadle Dorsey and his wife Milcah Goodwin.

As in so many old Maryland families, the Davises of the present generation find their paternal and maternal ancestors allied by kinship.In the case of the Democratic nominee for the Vice-Presidency we find his Davis forebears intermarrying with the same blood that descends to him through his mother, Louisa Brown, the daughter of John Riggs Brown and Sarah Gassaway. This Sarah Gassaway was the daughter of Brice J. Gassaway and Katharine Warfield, Brice J. Gassaway was a son of Nicholas Gassaway and brother of Capt. John Henry Gassaway and Lieut. Nicholas Gassaway, all officers in the Maryland Line. Through his Gassaway ancestry Hon. Henry G. Davis and his children, as well as Gov. Edwin Warfield, on. Arthur Pue Gorman, Mr. William H. Gorman and others, trace back to the Dorseys, Howards, Ridgelys, Worthingtons and Greenburys. Contemporary with these and the eldest living representatives of the John Riggs Brown line are Mr. Vachel Brown and Mr. J. Frank Brown, of Baltimore.

The various Colonial progenitors of the Davis family of Maryland include those who filled every important office in the gift of Lord Baltimore or of the people, hence it is only history repeating itself when we find in our own generation the representatives of the old governing families of the Province continuing to maintain the precedent set them by their worthy forebears. Every man or woman who is representative is as sure to have strong, notable ancestors as that like produces like.

Among the other distinguished sons of Maryland of this name that of Henry Winter Davis will always shine forth as a bright particular star. This eminent scholar, statesman and orator has always been marked as one of the greatest of Marylanders. His father was Rev. Henry Lyon Davis, of the Protestant Episcopal Church, and president of St. John’s College, at Annapolis. His mother was Jane Brown Winter. Henry Winter Davis married Miss Nancy Morris, daughter of Mr. John B. Morris, of Baltimore, by whom he had two daughters. Ephraim Davis, who settled at Greenwood in the year 1755, had a son Thomas, who, during Washington’s administration, raised a company and marched to Pennsylvania in 1794
to assist in suppressing the whiskey insurrection. During his absence he was elected a member of the Legislature, and was also an elector of the Senate under the old Constitution. He was a member of the Governor’s Council and a most important man in his day, being, among other things, Associate Judge of the County Court. His son, Allen Bowie Davis, like his father, was a man conspicuous in the official life of his generation. He was president of the State Board of Public Works, member of the constitutional convention and one of the first trustees and later president of the State Agricultural Society. The Hon. David Davis, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, is another distinguished son of Maryland. He was born in Cecil county, Maryland, and in early manhood removed to Illinois. He was a member of the constitutional convention and a delegate to the National Republican Convention in Chicago in 1860. Judge Davis was appointed by President Lincoln Judge of the Supreme Court of the United States in 1862. He was elected United States Senator to succeed John A. Logan. While, as we have seen, the name of Davis has been distinguished in the legislative hall and on the field, the Hon. Henry Gassaway Davis is the first son of Maryland to attain the high distinction of being nominated for the Vice-Presidency of the United States. He was born on the family estate,

Goodfellowship, located in Howard county, but which originally lay in Anne Arundel county. This estate had been patented to Joshua Brown and Alexander Randall early in 1700 — about 1720. Later Caleb Davis, father of the Hon. Henry G. Davis, bought the part which had belonged to Randall and which adjoined the lands of his wife’s family, the Browns. On this ancestral estate our distinguished Marylander was born and lived until the panic of 1835 swept independence from his father, who sold his home and everything he possessed that others might not lose through him.

With a heritage of cultured and distinguished ancestry on both sides and the high standards of life set him by a worthy father our new candidate for the Vice-Presidency faced the change of circumstances bravely and went to work as many a gentlemen’s son had done before him and because of the superior blood that was in him he soon attained the success which comes of earnest effort. From one post of honor to another he has been chosen to the second highest nomination in this country, and it is with pleasure that Maryland claims him as her own son and the representative of some of her most distinguished families.

Among the distinguished forebears of Hon. Henry Gassaway Davis are Col. Nicholas Greenberry, Deputy Governor of the Province, 1692, Keeper of the Great Seal and Member of his Lordship’s Council ;
Col. Edward Dorsey, Keeper of the Great Seal, Judge in the High Court of Chancery, etc.;
Capt. John Howard, of the Colonial Militia ;
Col. Nicholas Gassaway, Capt. John Worthington,
Capt. John Brice and others of equal distinction.
Among the descendants of the early Davises of
Maryland are Hon. Henry Gassaway Davis, of
Maryland and West Virginia ; Mrs. Stephen B.
Elkins, Miss Katharine Davis Elkins, Messrs.
Elkins, Mrs. Arthur Lee, Miss Katharine Grace
Davis Brown, daughter of Lieutenant-Com.
R. M. G. Brown, United States Navy ; Mrs. F.
S. Landstreet, of New York ; Mr. John T. Davis,
of Elkins, W. Va. ; Miss Mary Winter Davis, Miss
Mary Dorsey Davis and Miss Davis, of Greenwood,
Montgomery county ; Miss Maria Trimble Davis,
Mr. George A. Kirby, Miss Mary Hanson Kirby,
Miss Mallonee, Mrs. George R. A. Hiss, Mr.
George William Kirby, of New York.