Riggs Hills and Riggs Family lineage and origins

Riggs COA

Riggs Family Papers located in Library of Congress

It is, perhaps, not necessary to state that this little Appendix is intended to embrace only four or five families, bearing the Riggs’ name, but whose lineage has not been distinctly traced to Edward of Roxbury. They will be separately indexed, and the references will be to pages only and not to numbers. “The Maryland Family” shows much research and is specially valuable as furnishing starting-points for other tracings. It is so well done that it is given here in the form and words of its compiler, Mr. E. Francis Riggs, of Washington, D. C, and is as follows:

If too late to aid in furnishing matter for the work, which I am glad to know you now have in hand, I think I can tell you some interesting things. You ask for my ” Maryland family, ” but my investigations have been so directed to my father’s immediate line (which was not the eldest) that it would seem but fragmentary and incomplete to give you this as a satisfactory history of the clan. The name existed early in Maryland. One Francis Riggs was in Calvert County in 1663, acquiring no less than 2,300 acres of land, and died intestate in 1667, when his estates in the province were claimed by his first cousin, Joseph Riggs of Virginia. In the proceedings before the High Provincial Court the claimant set forth that his deceased cousin was son of John Riggs of Southampton (England), and that he, Joseph, was the son of Francis Riggs of Fareham, County of Hampshire (or Hants). (Fareham is a pretty market town at the northwest end of Portsmouth harbor, twelve miles southeast of Southampton and nine northwest of Portsmouth.) Of these two personages we learn no more, beyond the fact that Joseph established himself in Calvert County, and died there in 1671. In Virginia one John Riggs held land in lower Norfolk County in 1653. In 1689 Ensign John Riggs brought the official announcement of the accession of William and Mary to the throne to Nicholson, Lieutenant-Governor of New York.

My earliest known ancestor was John Riggs. An old Baxter’s Directory, printed in 1672, which from internal evidence probably belonged to his wife’s (Davis) family, mentions his death August 17, 1762, aged 75 years. He was, therefore, born in 1687. On the 16th of January, 1721-2 he married, at St. John’s Church, Annapolis, Mary, daughter of Thomas Davis and Mary, his wife, who (as I know from the same Baxter’s Directory) was born January 9, 1702, and died December 13, 1768. John Riggs is first mentioned in 1716 in the will of John Marriott, of Anne Arundel County, who bequeathed to him 50 acres, part of a tract called “Shepard’s Forest.” In 1723 he had surveyed a tract of land called “Riggs’ Hills, “on the northern branch of the Patuxent River, near the present village of Savage, containing 200 acres, and in 1725 he purchased an adjoining tract containing 142 acres, known as part of “Rich Neck.” Both of these tracts were in Queen Caroline Parish. The church was near what is now Laurel, Howard County, and John Riggs was a pewholder in 1736.

He also bought in 1751 a tract of land of 1,000 acres, called “Bordley’s Choice,” in that part of Frederick County now known as Montgomery County, near the village of Brookeville. John Riggs died, as I have said (and was probably buried at Riggs’ Hills, where a few graves, unmarked, are visible; his will was proved September 22, 1762), August 17, 1762, having had a numerous progeny, viz.:

1. Thomas, born October 20, 1722, died October 25, 1797.

2. Rachel, born June 11, 1724, married to Edward Warfield, October 6, 1741, by the Rev. James Macgill, at Queen Caroline Parish, died April 16, 1794, having had twelve children.

3. John, born July 11, 1726.

4. James, born April 13, 1728; was “Tobacco Inspector” for the Parish, September 6, 1736; was taxed, from 1756 to 1762, 300 pounds of tobacco annually as a “bachelor”; died August 14, 1780.

5. Ruth, born October 20, 1730, married Greenberry Griffith, had ten children, died October 18, 1779.

6. Mary, born September 24, 1732, married Benjamin Griffith, had eight children.

7. Catherine, born February 24, 1734, married Hyatt, died April 8,

1802.

8. Ann, born July 29, 1738.

9. Samuel, born October 6, 1740, was also a Tobacco Inspector in Queen Caroline Parish, September 2, 1766-7, married in 1767 Amelia Dorsey. daughter of Colonel Philemon Dorsey, of Anne Arundel County, and Catherine (Ridgeley) his wife; died at his farm, part of “Bordley’s Choice,” near Brookeville, Montgomery County (formerly part of Frederick County), May 25, 1814, and is there buried beside his wife, who was born August 23, 1749, and died August 6, 1807. They had twelve children.

10. Elisha, born October 4, 1742, married Delila Hammond, served as Captain of Continental Militia in Colonel Edward Gaither’s Battalion, and died June 6, 1777, and had three children.

11. Achsah (or “Nackey”), born January 27, 1745-6, married

Brown.

12. Amon, born April 21, 1748, married Ruth Griffith (died 1830, set. 83), December 21, 1769, died March 16, 1822, had nine children.

Family of Samuel R1ggs (of John) and Amelia (Dorsey):

1. Mary, born August 14, 1768, married Henry Griffith.

2. Henrietta, born December 22, 1769, married Daniel Gaither.

3. Thomas, born January 12, 1772, married November 17, 1796, Mary, daughter of his Uncle Elisha (of John) Riggs, died January 10, 1845, and had issue; was an eminent merchant in Baltimore.

4. Anna, born August 12, 1773, married her cousin, John H. (of Elisha), died February 18, 1796.

5. Reuben, born May 23, 1775, married Mary Thomas, died April 25, 1829.

6. George Washington, born August 14, 1777, was a successful merchant at Georgetown, D. C, and later in Baltimore, Md., married first Eliza Robinson, secondly Rebecca Norris, widow, and had issue by both wives.

7. Elisha, born June 13, 1779, married first Alice Lawrason (of James), of Alexandria, Va., September 17, 1812 (who died April 16, 1817, aged 25), leaving two sons, and secondly Mary Ann Karrick (of Joseph), July 16, 1822. Was highly successful in mercantile pursuits in Georgetown, D. C, and later in New York City, where he died August 3, 1853; buried in New York.

8. Eleanor, born June 7, 1781, died August, 1804.

9. Romulus, born December 22, 1782, married Mercy Ann Lawrason (of James), sister of Alice (above mentioned), May 29, 1810. Was a prosperous merchant and well-known citizen of Philadelphia, Pa., where he died October 2, 1846, leaving issue.

10. Julia, born December 22, 1784, died 1862, unmarried.

11. Samuel, born June 14, 1786, died September, 1805.

12. Remus, born January 12, 1790, married Katherine Adams, and had issue, died December 18, 1867.

Family of El1sha R1ggs (of John) and Delila Hammond, his wife:

1. John Hammond, married his cousin Anna (of Samuel).

2. Mary, born May 23, 1776, married her cousin Thomas (of Samuel), died May 10, 1829.

3. Sarah, born 1777, died October 22, 1795, s.p.

Family of Amon R1ggs (of John) and Ruth Griffith, his wife:

1. John, born 1771.

2. Henry, born 1772.

3. Charles, born 1774, died 1802.

4. Amon, born 1776.

5. James, born 1779.

6. Samuel, born 1781.

7. Joshua, born 1790, died 1810. 8 and 9. Two daughters.

Family of Thomas (of Samuel) Riggs and Mary (Riggs) his wife:

1. Sarah Hammond, born September 19, 1797, married Griffith,

died September 25, 1823, had issue.

2. Samuel, b. August 20, 1800, married Margaret Norris.

3. Caroline Eleanor, born June 7, 1803, married Caleb Dorsey, died April 13, 1877.

4. Elisha, born July 6, 1810, married Avolina Warfield, died June 16, 1883.

5. Thomas John, born May 15, 1815.

Family of El1sha (of Samuel) Riggs and Alice (Lawrason), his first wife:

1. George Washington, born at Georgetown, D. C, July 4, 1813, married at Madison, N. J., June 23, 1840, Janet Madeleine Cecelia SheddenBanker, died at his country seat, Greenhill, Md., near Washington, D. C, August 24, 1881.

2. Lawrason, born November 22, 1814, married first Sophia Crittenden (died without issue), secondly Frances Behn Clapp, thirdly Mary Bright, died October 13, 1884, leaving issue.

Family of Romulus (of Samuel) Riggs and Mercy Ann (Lawrason), his wife:

1. Samuel James, born September, 1811, married Medora Cheatham, of Nashville, Tenn., died July 4, 1847, s.p.

2. Amelia Dorsey, born 1813, married James P. Erskine, left issue.

3. Alice Ann, born 1815, married James W. Bacon, M.D., of Philadelphia, died February 21, 1839, leaving issue.

4. James Lawrason, born 1817, married thrice.

5. Mercy Ann, born 1819, died November 21, 1821.

6. Mary Elizabeth, born 1821, married Robert Colgate, of New York City.

7. Henrietta, born 1823, married Samuel G. Battle, of Mobile, Ala., had issue; lives in Philadelphia.

8. Julia Mandeville, born 1825, married George H. Boker, of Philadelphia, died 1899.

9. Illinois, married Charles H. Graff, of Philadelphia.

So much for the first four generations of the family in Maryland ; more is scarcely needed for your purpose, and besides my notes are incomplete in the various branches outside my immediate family, in the later generations.

As to the origin of the Riggs family, I have always been convinced that the New England, New Jersey, and Maryland clans were of the same common origin, and that their origin was English. In England, the name is, I believe, extinct. I have been unable to find it there. I had research made in England years ago, and from wills filed in the public records it seems that the name under various forms, Rygge, Rigge, Rigges, and Riggs appears early in the fifteenth century. One, Thomas Riggs, of Southampton, whose will was proved in 1551, was an alderman of that town (County of Hampshire). His son Thomas died possessed of the manor of Fareham, near Southampton, and other sons, Edward, William, and John, are mentioned in the father1s (Thomas) will. Thomas (second) had a son Rafe, who married Mary Blake, of Hampshire. Raff. had—

1. Thomas, of Fareham; buried at Fareham, 1638.

2. Robert, of Fareham, married Margery Chambers, of Southampton; his will proved 1644.

3. Ralph, three times Mayor, City of Winchester (Hampshire), married Mary Johnson, of Buckinghamshire; will proved 1647.

4. Francis, married Katherine Knight, died before 1636.

5. William, baptized at Fareham, 1593.

6. John, of Southampton, merchant, married Marie Blake Hopgood, 1626; will proved 1636.

7. Mary, baptized 1585, married thrice.

8. Elizabeth, baptized 1591.

9. Anne, baptized 1596, married twice.

Thomas, son of Robert and Margery Chambers, had—

1. Robert, born 1632, ob. s.p.

2. Elizabeth, married Robert Coates.

3. Margery, married December 4, 1631, John Earlesman.

4. Mary, baptized February 27, 1629-30, married Sir John Otway, Knt.

5. Margaret, married Thomas Baker.

Ralph (or Rafe) Riggs, of Winchester, third son of Rafe and Mary (Blake) Riggs, married Mary Johnson, had—

1. Francis.

2. Ralph, ob. s.p.

3. Thomas, married Constance Hook, of Hook, County of Southampton.

4. Edmund, of Winchester, will proved April 27, 1660, buried in Winchester Cathedral, married Margaret Savage, of King Clere, County of Southampton.

5. Ogle, married Mercy, co-heiress of John Lock, of Hollist, County of Sussex, died 1705, set. 69.

6. Mary, married Anthony Yelden, of Winchester.

7. Elizabeth.

Franc1s R1ggs, fourth son of Rafe and Mary (Blake) Riggs, married Katherine Knight, and had—

1. Francis;

2. Joseph;

3. Benjamin;

4. Alice, married Thomas Heither;

5. Elizabeth, married Masey;

6. Catherine, married , Mitchell;

7. Susan, married Charlete.

John R1ggs, of Southampton, merchant, sixth son of Rafe and Mary (Blake) Riggs, married Mary Hopgood at Fareham, January 12, 1622-3, had—

1. John;

2. Thomas, born 1636;

3. Francis;

4. Maria;

5. Elizabeth;

6. Anne.

Thomas R1ggs, third son of Ralph and Mary (Johnson) Riggs, married Constance Hook, and had—

1. Ralph, baptized at Fareham, April 9, 1657.

2. Constance, baptized at Fareham, July 29, 1650, married George Downs.

3. Thomas, baptized at Fareham, November 25, 1652.

Edmund R1ggs, of Winchester, fourth son of Ralph and Mary (Johnson) Riggs, married Margaret Savage, and had—

1. Edmond,

2. Thomas,

3. Mary.

Ogle R1ggs, fifth son of Ralph and Mary (Johnson) Riggs, married Mercy Lock, and had—

1. Thomas, born 1651;

2. Ogle, of Hollist House, County of Sussex;

3. Robert,

4. Ralph,

5. Elizabeth,

6. Mercy,

7. Mary.

Ogle R1ggs, of Hollist House, Eastbourne, County of Sussex, married and had a son Ogle, born 1687, High Sheriff in 1730, of Hollist House, who married Elizabeth, daughter of Michael Mushgrave, of “Parish of Christchurch,” N. Virginia (she died January 23, 1762). Ogle died December 7, 1766. They had—

1. Thomas, Captain in Royal Navy, married Anne Bettesworth 1748, died in South Carolina, s.p.

2. Ogle, born 1736, died February 5, 1773, s.p.

3. Mercy, died October 18, 1772.

These names, representing several generations of the (English) family of Hampshire and Sussex, are to be found in “Berry’s Visitation of Hants,” and the “Visitation of Sussex” by the same author, somewhat amplified as to dates, etc., by my own searches and by a pedigree prepared for me at the Herald’s College, London, some years ago. I had prepared also a reference list of wills on record in England and abstractsfrom the wills of certain of the Southampton Riggs, but the latter were lost by a professional genealogist who attempted to fix the origin of my ancestor John. While my efforts have been unsuccessful in this, I have always felt convinced that our descent was from this Southampton and Fareham family. I have seen the parish church, Fareham, and in the chancel in a prominent place are the monuments of several of the family, with armorial bearings. The Manor House of Fareham, once held by the Riggs’ family, I was not able to identify. The arms, as given in Berry, of the Hampshire Riggs are: Gules, a fesse, vair, between these three water spaniels, argent, each holding in the mouth a birdbolt, or, plumed argent. Crest: a talbot, passant, gules, eared, or, holding in the mouth a birdbolt of the second (or) plumed argent.

During the past summer I had some correspondence with a professional genealogist, Mr. Gustave Anjou, of 132 Nassau Street, New York City (or P. O. Box 2,611), who informed me that he had devoted years, to tracing the history of the family, in this country and in England. L have recently written to him asking if you might count on his aid, but he has replied that his records are only available on payment of a proper return for his labor and then not for publication. It may or may not be of value to you to communicate with Mr. Anjou. I may add that the pedigree I give of the Hampshire Riggs may be incomplete and that individuals are missing in it from whom the American emigrants were descended. Yours faithfully, E. Francis Riggs.

Taken From , Appendix Genealogy of the Riggs family: with a number of cognate branches descended … By John Hankins Wallace

Riggs Genealogy

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The Davis Family of Maryland, Virginia, and Wales

Davis’s of Maryland Coat of Arms from Side Lights of Maryland History 1904

Arms — Sable, three nag's heads, heads erased argent
Crest — A wolf salient argent

My modernized version of the Coat of Arms

The Welsh Davises derive their descent, according to the best authorities, from the Prince of Powis, the opponent of Ethelfrid, King of Northumberland, at the battles of Chester and Bangor, about the commencement of the seventh century. Nineteenth in descent from Prince Brachwel of Powis was Meilir Gryg, direct ancestor of David, son of John ap David of Llivior, who, according to the Welsh custom, assumed the modern surname of Davies in the year 1637 when signing a deed of family settlement.

Note: I will add the connecting genealogy when I get the time.

English authorities, claim that this Welsh line can be traced back to those brave Britons who lined the coast of Kent to oppose the landing of Julius Caesar, but the record as given starts a few centuries before the Norman Conquest, beginning with Prince Rhodri “Molwynog,” the cognomen meaning ” Welsh blood being up.” He settled on the north of the Severn after his removal from Cambrian Wessex, where many of the Britons who preferred liberty to the foreign yoke followed their chief.

His great-grandson, Rhodri Mawr, or “the great,” divided Wales into three distinct royalties for his three eldest sons, Cadell, Avarawd and Mervyn,

The Davises of Welsh origin, of Hope and Marsh, in Shropshire, England, bear the following arms :
Arms — A goat argent, horned or, standing on a child of the same, swaddled gules, and feeding on a tree eradicated vert, a crescent for difference.

Crest — On a mount vert a goat couchant argent, under a tree proper.

This line descends from David, whose son Hugh ap David (Davis) of Hope had a son William ap Hugh, whose heir Jeuan ap William of Hope married Alson, daughter of John Hewes.

He was succeeded by David ap Jeuan, of Marshe, in com. Salop, who married Eliun, daughter of John Williams.

Reynold Davys, the son and heir, married Ellen, daughter of James Morris, who had sons Edward and James Davis. Of these, James married Miss Martyn and had a son, John Davis.

Although the late George Lachlin Davis stated in his account of the early emigrants that the Davises of Mount Hope did not leave the principality of Wales until after 1720, we find an early Davis, with the very suggestive Welsh name of Evan Davis, receiving a patent for 200 acres of land on the Severn in the year 1672.

The similarity of the names of their estates would suggest that the Davises of Hope in Great Britain were forebears of the Davises of Mount Hope in Maryland. This is an interesting point for further investigation.

Whether or not the various original settlers of this name came from Wales originally does not concern us.

The Davis name has been prominent in the annals of Maryland ever since the days of the first notable assembly whose records have been preserved to us, for in the year 1637 John Davis sat as a representative for St. Marie’s Hundred, while the several successive years Thomas Davis contributed his services in molding the foundations of our government.

These early members of the Davis family in Maryland were from Virginia, and probably sons of James Davis, of Henrico, Gentleman, who came to Virginia in the good ship George in the year 1617. The records show that several of the Davises came from the Old Dominion into Maryland, and were perhaps kinsmen of Sir William Davis, of Bristol, England, to whom letters from Virginia are still extant.

America_Pinnace_Virginia_1584_artist

After the resurvey between Maryland and Virginia, lands in Somerset county were granted these two brothers by the Lord Baltimore, their estates being previously on the Accomac side. His Lordship’s rent rolls show that 7,000 acres in Somerset county alone were patented to members of the Davis family.

On both sides of the Chesapeake members of this distinguished name were large landholders and lived in the lavish way peculiar to the Colonial gentry. The Davis men were from earliest times conspicuous in the military affairs of the Province. In the year 1667 we find Capt. Hopkins Davis commanding a company of foote (soldiers) in Choptank and Miles river, Talbot county, and Capt. John Davis, of the same county, martialling his men against attack. Among the men of this name who were paid by the Assembly of Maryland for public services to the Province prior to 1685 were George Davis, Griffith Davis, John Davis, Thomas Davis, William Davis, Samuel Davis and Jonas Davis.

In the year 1694 John Davis was appointed commissioner and justice of the peace for trial and cause for Talbot county, of which he was also a military officer.

While it has been claimed that the Western Shore Davises did not arrive in Maryland until much later than those on the Eastern Shore, the Colonial records disprove this, as above shown. As early as 1694 John Davis was a justice of Prince George’s county. The names of Samuel and John Davis appear in a list of loyal subjects in Somerset county in 1689, in which year a petition for a Protestant government was addressed to the King. While the Davis men filled with fidelity many civil offices of importance and served their government on the Colonial field, including the French and Indian wars, it is especially notable for the large number of commissioned officers in the Revolutionary service.

Among these were Col. Richard Davis, 1778 ;
Capt. John Davis, Snow Hill Battalion 1777 ;
Capt. Phillip Davis, Thirteenth Battalion, Kent county, 1778 ;
Capt. Richard Davis, of Washington county ;
Capt. John Davis, of Wicomico Battalion ;
First Lieutenant Nixon Davis,
First Lieutenant Jesse Davis, of Worcester county, 1776 ;
First Lieutenant Amos Davis, of Washington county, 1778 ;
First Lieutenant Lodowich Davis and Second Lieutenant Griffith Davis, Middle Battalion, Montgomery county ;
First Lieutenant James Davis, of Dorchester county ;
Philemon Davis, a sergeant in the mounted company that marched from Queen Anne’s county February 3, 1776 ;
Lieut. Col. Richard Davis, of Frederick county troops, 1776 ;
Ensign Rezin Davis, of Frederick, 1776 ;
Second Lieutenant Richard Davis, Baltimore county, 1776 ;
Ensign Alexander Davis, commissioned second lieutenant August, 1777 ;
Ensign William Davis, Baltimore Battalion, 1777 ;
Richard Davis, of Washington county, appointed to purchase provisions for the United States Army, 1778 ;

Robert Paine Davis, ensign of Capt. Thomas Watkins’ company, on West river, in Anne Arundel county, 1779. There were other officers and no less than 50 privates by the name of Davis who served in the Maryland troops during the War of Independence.

While from the foregoing we can have no doubt as to the patriotic blood of the Davis men, yet more than once the name is enrolled among those who held the scales of justice, and while so many of the family were giving their lives to their country’s service Samuel Davis, of Kent, and Richard Davis, of Washington county, were filling the honorable and important office of justice of the county courts in the year 1778.

In the journal of the Council of safety reference is made to Captain Davis as “sea commander.” While one of the early rectors of William and Mary Parish was Thomas Davis, we find Rev. Samuel Davis preaching to the early Presbyterian flock in Somerset county, where his name is still revered as one who helped to plant the vine in the virgin soil of the New World.

The various branches of the Davis family in Maryland intermarried with the other representative Colonial families, and particularly is this the case in the branch in Anne Arundel county. Here we find Richard Davis marrying Ruth Warfield, daughter of John Warfield and his wife, Ruth Gaither, whose ancestors first settled in Virginia and took part in the affairs of that colony. The children of this marriage of Richard Davis and Ruth Warfield were Richard, John, Thomas, Caleb, Elizabeth and Ruth Davis. Caleb Davis arrived at man’s estate, like others of his family, in time to fight in the Revolutionary War. He married Lucretia Griffith, daughter of Orlando Griffith and his wife, Katharine Howard, daughter of Capt. John Howard, Jr., and Katharine Greenbury. Ruth Davis, sister of Caleb Davis, married Joshua Warfield, the son of Benjamin. Elizabeth Davis married John Marriott.

Other marriages of Davises with well-known families was that of Ephraim Davis to Elizabeth Howard ; Allen Bowie Davis and Rebecca Comfort Dorsey, daughter of Chief Justice Thomas Beadle Dorsey and his wife Milcah Goodwin.

As in so many old Maryland families, the Davises of the present generation find their paternal and maternal ancestors allied by kinship.In the case of the Democratic nominee for the Vice-Presidency we find his Davis forebears intermarrying with the same blood that descends to him through his mother, Louisa Brown, the daughter of John Riggs Brown and Sarah Gassaway. This Sarah Gassaway was the daughter of Brice J. Gassaway and Katharine Warfield, Brice J. Gassaway was a son of Nicholas Gassaway and brother of Capt. John Henry Gassaway and Lieut. Nicholas Gassaway, all officers in the Maryland Line. Through his Gassaway ancestry Hon. Henry G. Davis and his children, as well as Gov. Edwin Warfield, on. Arthur Pue Gorman, Mr. William H. Gorman and others, trace back to the Dorseys, Howards, Ridgelys, Worthingtons and Greenburys. Contemporary with these and the eldest living representatives of the John Riggs Brown line are Mr. Vachel Brown and Mr. J. Frank Brown, of Baltimore.

The various Colonial progenitors of the Davis family of Maryland include those who filled every important office in the gift of Lord Baltimore or of the people, hence it is only history repeating itself when we find in our own generation the representatives of the old governing families of the Province continuing to maintain the precedent set them by their worthy forebears. Every man or woman who is representative is as sure to have strong, notable ancestors as that like produces like.

Among the other distinguished sons of Maryland of this name that of Henry Winter Davis will always shine forth as a bright particular star. This eminent scholar, statesman and orator has always been marked as one of the greatest of Marylanders. His father was Rev. Henry Lyon Davis, of the Protestant Episcopal Church, and president of St. John’s College, at Annapolis. His mother was Jane Brown Winter. Henry Winter Davis married Miss Nancy Morris, daughter of Mr. John B. Morris, of Baltimore, by whom he had two daughters. Ephraim Davis, who settled at Greenwood in the year 1755, had a son Thomas, who, during Washington’s administration, raised a company and marched to Pennsylvania in 1794
to assist in suppressing the whiskey insurrection. During his absence he was elected a member of the Legislature, and was also an elector of the Senate under the old Constitution. He was a member of the Governor’s Council and a most important man in his day, being, among other things, Associate Judge of the County Court. His son, Allen Bowie Davis, like his father, was a man conspicuous in the official life of his generation. He was president of the State Board of Public Works, member of the constitutional convention and one of the first trustees and later president of the State Agricultural Society. The Hon. David Davis, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, is another distinguished son of Maryland. He was born in Cecil county, Maryland, and in early manhood removed to Illinois. He was a member of the constitutional convention and a delegate to the National Republican Convention in Chicago in 1860. Judge Davis was appointed by President Lincoln Judge of the Supreme Court of the United States in 1862. He was elected United States Senator to succeed John A. Logan. While, as we have seen, the name of Davis has been distinguished in the legislative hall and on the field, the Hon. Henry Gassaway Davis is the first son of Maryland to attain the high distinction of being nominated for the Vice-Presidency of the United States. He was born on the family estate,

Goodfellowship, located in Howard county, but which originally lay in Anne Arundel county. This estate had been patented to Joshua Brown and Alexander Randall early in 1700 — about 1720. Later Caleb Davis, father of the Hon. Henry G. Davis, bought the part which had belonged to Randall and which adjoined the lands of his wife’s family, the Browns. On this ancestral estate our distinguished Marylander was born and lived until the panic of 1835 swept independence from his father, who sold his home and everything he possessed that others might not lose through him.

With a heritage of cultured and distinguished ancestry on both sides and the high standards of life set him by a worthy father our new candidate for the Vice-Presidency faced the change of circumstances bravely and went to work as many a gentlemen’s son had done before him and because of the superior blood that was in him he soon attained the success which comes of earnest effort. From one post of honor to another he has been chosen to the second highest nomination in this country, and it is with pleasure that Maryland claims him as her own son and the representative of some of her most distinguished families.

Among the distinguished forebears of Hon. Henry Gassaway Davis are Col. Nicholas Greenberry, Deputy Governor of the Province, 1692, Keeper of the Great Seal and Member of his Lordship’s Council ;
Col. Edward Dorsey, Keeper of the Great Seal, Judge in the High Court of Chancery, etc.;
Capt. John Howard, of the Colonial Militia ;
Col. Nicholas Gassaway, Capt. John Worthington,
Capt. John Brice and others of equal distinction.
Among the descendants of the early Davises of
Maryland are Hon. Henry Gassaway Davis, of
Maryland and West Virginia ; Mrs. Stephen B.
Elkins, Miss Katharine Davis Elkins, Messrs.
Elkins, Mrs. Arthur Lee, Miss Katharine Grace
Davis Brown, daughter of Lieutenant-Com.
R. M. G. Brown, United States Navy ; Mrs. F.
S. Landstreet, of New York ; Mr. John T. Davis,
of Elkins, W. Va. ; Miss Mary Winter Davis, Miss
Mary Dorsey Davis and Miss Davis, of Greenwood,
Montgomery county ; Miss Maria Trimble Davis,
Mr. George A. Kirby, Miss Mary Hanson Kirby,
Miss Mallonee, Mrs. George R. A. Hiss, Mr.
George William Kirby, of New York.