Genealogical history of the Lewis Family

Taken from: “Some prominent Virginia families: Volume 2 – Page 620″ by Louise Pecquet du Bellet, Edward Jaquelin, Martha Cary Jaquelin

lewis-arms

Motto translated means”Every land is a brave man’s country.”

It is a question very often discussed of late as to whether the hour makes the man or the man the hour. To a student of the history of Virginia an answer is very soon given, for since the settlement of Jamestown, in 1607, which was virtually the birth of this country, there has never arisen a crisis of any kind when Virginia, our mother State, has not had one or more of her sons ready to meet it. When the hour arrives the man appears. We may search the pages of history in vain for a nobler or as noble a group of men as Washington and his patriot Virginians in 1776.

The Lewis family of Virginia is one of the most distinguished families in the State. It is connected by marriage with many of the best-known names, such as Washington. Marshall, Fielding, Merriweather, Daingerfield, Taliaferro and others. The men of the family from the time when they first settled in the colony, about the middle of the seventeenth century, have been men of action and distinction; they have won for themselves the most remarkable record as soldiers. It is recorded on the tombstone of “Pioneer John” that he furnished five sons for the Revolution. There were five colonels in the Revolution—Colonel Nicholas, Colonel Fielding, Colonel William, Colonel Charles and Colonel Joel—and quite a number of majors and captains. The Lewises also won a gallant record in the War of 1812, the Mexican War and in the Confederate States Army.

The Lewis family were originally French Huguenots, and left France after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, 1685. Three brothers—namely, William, Samuel and John—fled to England. (See “History of the Huguenots.”) Shortly afterwards William removed to the north of Ireland, where he married a Miss McClelland; Samuel fixed his residence in Wales, while John continued in England. Descendants of each of these three brothers are supposed to have settled in Virginia.

About the middle of the seventeenth century four brothers of the Lewis family left Wales.

I. Samuel Lewis, went to Portugal; nothing is known of him.

II. William Lewis, d. in Ireland.

III. General Robert Lewis, d. in Gloucester Co., Va.

IV. John Lewis, d. in Hanover Co., Va.

1. I. William Lewis1, one of the Welsh brothers; d. in Ireland. Married Miss McClelland and left one son:

2. I. Andrew Lewis3. Married Miss Calhoun.
They had Issue:

3. I. John Lewis2, b. 1678, in Ireland. Married Margaret Lynn.

4. II. Samuel Lewis2, b. 1680. ‘No issue.

III. John Lewis3 (Andrew2, William1). In 1720 John Lewis left Ireland a fugitive, having stabbed Sir Inango Campbell, his Irish landlord, who attempted in a lawless and brutal manner to evict him from his premises, of which he held a freehold lien, and had slain an invalid brother, before his eves. He first took refuge in Portugal, and later fled to America and settled in Pennsylvania; then in Augusta Co., Va. In Campbell’s “History of Virginia” he is styled as Pioneer John Lewis. He is described as being tall and of great muscular strength, and was one of the best backwoodsmen of his day. He built his house with portholes in it, so that he could successfully contend with the savage tribes that infested the country. When Augusta County was organized he was the founder of Staunton, the county seat, and was one of the first magistrates appointed by the Governor. John Lewis died in 1762. On his tombstone it is recorded that he gave five sons to fight the battles of the American Revolution.

John Lewis and Margaret Lynn, his wife, had issue:

.”>. I. Samuel Lewis4, served with distinction as a captain in the war between the English and French colonists. His brothers, Andrew. William and Charles, were members of his company, and all four were at Braddock’s defeat, and three of them were wounded. Samuel was afterwards conspicuous in the defense of Greenbrier County and the border settlements from the Indians. He was born 1716: d. unmarried.

6. II. Thomas Lewis4, b. in Ireland, 1718.

7. III. Andrew Lewis4, b. in Ireland, 1750.

8. IV. William Lewis4, b. in Ireland, 1724.

9. V. Margaret Lewis4, b. in Ireland, 1726.

10. VI. Anne Lewis4, b. in Ireland, 1728.

11. VII. Charles Lewis4, b. in Virginia, 1736.

Alice Lewis4. Married Mr. Madison.

IV. Col. Andrew Lewis4 (John”, Andrew2, William1), son of John Lewis (Pioneer) and Margaret Lynn, daughter of the Laird of Loch Lynn, chieftain of the once powerful Clan of Loch Lynn: b. in Ireland, 1720. He emigrated with his father to America, and settled in Augusta Co., Va. He took a very active part in the Indian Wars. In 1754 he was twice wounded in the battle of Fort Necessity, under General Washington, by whom he was appointed major of hie regiment. General Lewis was, with four of his brothers, in a company of which the eldest was captain, at Braddock’s defeat, in 1758. “General Andrew Lewis was several times a member of the Colonial Legislature.

An Indian war being anticipated, Lord Dunmore appointed General Lewis commander of the Southern forces. September 11, 1774, General Lewis, with eleven hundred men, commenced his march through the wilderness. After a march of one hundred and sixty miles they reached Point Pleasant, at the junction of the Great Kanawha and Ohio rivers, and there on October 10, 1774, he signally defeated the Shawnee Indians. He is known as the hero of Point Pleasant. His strikingly majestic form and figure never failed to remind me of the memorable remark made by the Governor of the colony of New York, when General Lewis was a commissioner on behalf of Virginia at the treaty of Fort Stanwix, in New York, in 1768, that “the earth seemed to tremble under him as he walked along.” His statue is one of those around that of the father of his country, in Capitol Square, Richmond, Va.; it is marked with the name of Andrew Lewis, the “Hero of Point Pleasant.”

General Washington, under whom Lewis had served in various capacities, had formed such a high estimate of Lewis’s character and ability, it is said, that when the chief command of the Revolutionary army was proposed to Washington, he expressed a wish that it had been given to General Lewis. General Lewis died in 1781.

General Andrew Lewis married (1749) Elizabeth Givens, of Augusta Co., Va., and left issue:

12. I. Captain John Lewis5, who was an officer under his father at Grant’s defeat, when he was made prisoner and carried to Quebec and thence to France. Married Patsy Love of Alexandria, Va. Issue:

13. I. Andrew Samuel Lewis5. Married Miss Whilby.

14. II. Charles Lewis5. Married daughter of Gen. Abraham Trigg, of Virginia.

15. III. Elizabeth Lewis5. Married, second, Mr. Ball; third,

Mr. Marshall. (Her first husband was Mr. Luke, of Alexandria, Va.)

16. II. Thomas Lewis”. Married Miss Evans, of Point Pleasant, Va.

17. III. Colonel Samuel Lewis5, U. S. A.; d. unmarried in Greenbrier Co., Va.

18. IV. Colonel Andrew Lewis”, V. S. A. of the Brent

Mountain, b. 1759. Married Eliza, daughter of John Madison, of Montgomery Co., Va.; d. 1844.
They had Issue:

19. I. Charles Lewis5, d. unmarried.

20. II. Thomas Lewis5, a distinguished lawyer who killed and was killed by Mr. McHenry in a duel with rifles at the distance of thirty yards, the first duel at close quarters ever fought with rifles in Virginia. Left no issue.

21. III. — Lewis8, d. young.

22. IV. . Lewis5, d. young.

23. V. Agatha Lewis”, b. 1778. Married Col. Elijah McClanahan, of Botetourt Co., Va.

24. V. Annie Lewis”. Married Roland Madison, of Kentucky.
They had Issue:

25. I. John Madison”.

26. II. Eliza Lewis Madison”. Married Mr. Worthington of Maryland.

27. III. Andrew Lewis Madison”, d. captain in U. S. A.

28. IV. Roland Madison”, Jr., lived (1873) in Rushville, Indiana.

29. VI. William Lewis”, b. 1764. Married, first, Lucy, daughter of John Madison; second, Nancy McClenahan.

1. 1. General Robert Lewis1^ brother of William Lewis1, with his wife and two sons came to Virginia in 1645, in the good ship “Blessing.” The names of the sons were:

2. I. Colonel John Lewis2, Sr.

3. II. William Lewis2, of Chemokins, St. Peters Parish. New Kent Co., Va.

I. Colonel John Lewis2 Sr. (General Robert Lewis1). Married Isabella Warner, daughter of Augustine Warner, of Warner Hall, Gloucester Co., Va., Speaker of the first House of Burgesses.
They had issue:
4. I. Major John Lewis3, Jr., of Gloucester Co., Va., ii member of the Virginia Council, b. Nov. 30, 1669. Married Frances Fielding. She d. 1731; he d. 1754.

5. II. Warner Lewis3. Married Eleanor, widow of William Gooch, son of Sir William Gooch, Governor of Virginia, and daughter of James Bowles, of Maryland.

0. III. Lewis3. Married Col. Willis, of Fredericksburg, Va.

7. IV. Lewis3. Married Francis Merriweather.

8. V. Major John Lewis3.

9. VI. Isabella Lewis3.

10. VII. Anna Lewis3.
III. Major John Lewis3 (John2, Robert1), of Gloucester Co., Va., member of the Virginia Council, b. November 30, 1669. Married Frances Fielding: d. 1731. He d. 1754. Issue:

11. I. Colonel Robert Lewis4, of Belvoir, Albemarle Co., Va.

12. II. Colonel Charles Lewis4, of the Byrd.

13. III. Colonel Fielding Lewis4. Married, first, Catherine; second, Betty Washington.

IV. Warner Lewis4 (Warner3, John2, Robert1), son of Warner Lewis3 and Eleanor Gooch. Married, first. Mary Chiswell; second, Mary Fleming.

Issue by first marriage:

14. I. Warner Lewis”. Married Courtenay Norton. Issue: I. Courtenay Warner Lewis5. Married Mr. Selden, of Gloucester, Va.

IV. Colonel Fielding Lewis4 (Major John Lewis3 Sr, Col. John Lewis2 Sr-, General Robert Lewis1), second son of Warner Lewis and Eleanor Gooch. Married Agnes Hanvood. They lived at Weyanoke, on the James River. Fielding Lewis held a high place in society, and was considered one of the fathers of Virginia agriculture. His portrait, with that of John Taylor, of Caroline, and other distinguished agriculturists, may now be seen in the rooms of the Agricultural Society of Richmond, placed there by order of the society. Issue:

15. I. Margaret Waddrop Lewis”.

16. II. Frances Fielding Lewis”.

17. III. Anne Lewis””.

18. IV. Frances Lewis7′.

19. V. Eleanor W. Lewis”.

Margaret W. Lewis5 married Thomas Marshall, eldest son of Chief Justice Marshall. Their descendants are given in Volume I, Chapters V, VI, VII.

Eleanor Warner Lewis”. Married Robert Douthat. Their descendants now living in Baltimore are:

I. Mr. Montgomery 0. Selden, his children Allen and Elizabeth Selden.

II. Mr. Bolling Selden, his children Mrs. Swope, Susan P.
Selden, Agnes Lewis Selden and Alice Selden.

The descendants of Mrs. Courtenay Warner Lewis, who married Mr. William Selden, of Gloucester, are:

Mrs. Charles Dimmock, Mrs. William Dimmock, and Mrs. Loyd Tabb. This branch of the family inherited Warner Hall in Gloucester.

V. Frances Fielding Lewis5 (Fielding4. Warner’1, John2, Robert1), daughter of Fielding Lewis and Agnes Harwood, his wife. Married Archibald Taylor, of Norfolk, Va. Issue:

20. I. Fielding Lewis Taylor”, a colonel in the Confederate army, who was killed in a battle. Married Farley Fauntleroy. Issue:

21. I. Archibald Taylor7. Married Martha Fauntleroy.

Issue:

22. I. Archibald Taylor”.

23. II. Thomas Taylor8, served under Gen. Robert E. Lee

in the Confederate army. He was killed at the Battle of Shiloh. V. Eleanor Warner Lewis8 (Fielding4. Warner3, John2, Robert1), daughter of Fielding Lewis and Agnes Harwood, his wife. Married Robert Douthat, of Weyanoke. Issue:

I Robert Douthat5. Married, first, Mary Ambler Marshall; second, Betty W. Wade. Issue Vol. I.

The issue of William H. Selden and Jane Douthat, were:
I. Robert Selden..
II. Eleanor Selden.

III. William Selden.

IV. Bolling Selden.
V. Agnes Selden.

VI. Montgomery Selden.
VII. Lewis Selden.

IV. Col. Robert Lewis4 (Major John Lewis2, John2, Robert1), of Belvoir, Albemarle Co., Va. Married Jane, daughter of Nicholas Merriweather; d. 1757. His will is recorded in Albemarle Co., Va.

IV. Col. Charles Lewis4 (Major John Lewis3, John2, Robert1), of the Byrd. Married Lucy, daughter of John Taliaferro, of the Manor Plantation, of Snow Creek, Spottsylvania Co., Va., about 1750.

IV. Colonel Fielding Lewis4 (Major John Lewis3, John2, Robert1), son of Major John Lewis and Frances Fielding, his wife. Married (1746) Catherine Washington, a cousin of General Washington; second, Betty Washington, sister of General Washington.

Col. Fielding settled near Fredericksburg, Va. He was a member of the House of Burgesses, a merchant and vestryman. There is in the possession of a descendant of Col. Fielding Lewis and his wife, Betty Washington, an old family Bible, a hereditary relic for five generations, having been given by Mary Ball Washington to her only daughter, Betty (Mrs. Fielding Lewis), and transmitted directly to her descendants. During the Revolution, in 1776, Col. Fielding Lewis was an ardent patriot and did special service by superintending the manufacture of arms for the use of the army.

Col. Fielding Lewis and Catherine Washington, his first wife, had issue:

24. I. John Lewis5, b. 1747. Married five times.

25. II. Francis Lewis5, d. young.

26. III. Warner Lewis5, d. young. Issue by second wife:

27. IV. Fielding Lewis”.

28. V. Augustine Lewis”.

29. VI. Warner Lewis”.

30. VII. George Washington Lewis”
.
31. VIII. Mary Lewis”. married William Lyons

32. IX. Charles Lewis”.

33. X. Samuel Lewis”.

34. XL Bettie Lewis”.

35. XII. Lawrence Lewis”.

36. XIII. Robert Lewis”.

37. XIV. Howell Lewis5, b. 1771. Married Miss Pollard, and

left issue.

V. John Lewis5 (Fielding4, John1, John2, Robert1), son of Col. Fielding Lewis and Catherine Washington, his first wife, b. 1747. He was a graduate of Oxford. England, and died in Logan County, Kentucky. Married five times, first, Lucy Thornton: second, Elizabeth, daughter of Gabriel Jones; third, Miss Jones; fourth, Mary Ann Fontaine, widow of Bowles Armistead; fifth, Mrs. Mercer, nee Carter.

V. Fielding Lewis5 (Fielding4, John2, John2, Robert1), fourth son of Col. Fielding Lewis. Married and died in Fairfax Co., Va., leaving no male issue. Issue:

38. I. Catherine Lewis8. Married Henry Chew Dade. 3!l. II. Lucinda Lewis5. Married Gilson Foote.

V. George W. Lewis5 (Fielding4, John2, John2, Robert1), seventh son of Col. Fielding, b. June 24, 1755. He was a captain in Colonel Baylor’s regiment of cavalry, during the Revolutionary War, and commander of General Washington’s life-guards. It is said that General Mercer expired in his arms at the battle of Princeton. Married Miss Daingerfield and lived in Clarke Co., Va.; died at his county seat, Marmion, in 1871. He enjoyed the highest confidence of General Washington and was sent by him on a secret expedition to Canada.

George Washington Lewis and Miss Daingerfield, his wife, had issue:

40. I. Mary Lewis”. Married Col. Byrd Willis. (See Willis Family, Chapter IX.)

41. II. Daingerfield Lewis”.

42. III. Samuel Lewis”.

43. IV. Bettie Lewis”, b. 1765. Married Charles Carter.

(See Carter Family, Chapter VII.)

V. Lawrence Lewis5 (Fielding4, John3, John2, Robert1), twelfth son of Colonel Fielding Lewis, b. 1767. He lived on his estate, Woodlawn, near Mount Vernon. He was the adopted son and executor of the will of General “Washington. Married Eleanor Parke Custis, daughter of Washington Parke Custis, adopted child of Mrs. Washington. They had issue:

44. I. Lorenzo Lewis”.

45. II. Lawrence Lewis”.

46. III. Frances Parke Lewis”.

47. IV. Washington Lewis”, lived in Clarke Co., Va. His descendants own many of the old family portraits, among them those of Col. Fielding Lewis and his second wife, Betty Washington. V. .Robert Lewis3 (Fielding4, John2, John2, Robert1), thirteenth son of Col. Fielding Lewis and Betty Washington, his second wife; was private secretary to General Washington during his presidential term. Married Miss Brown and settled in Fredericksburg, Va. Issue:

48. I. Daughter Lewis5. Married Rev. Edward McGuire of Fredericksburg, Va.

49. II. Daughter Lewis”. Married George W. Bassett, of Richmond, Va.

From Bishop Meade’s “Old Families”.we quote the following account:

Among the families who belonged to Pohick Church was that of Mr. Lawrence Lewis, nephew of General Washington. He married Miss Custis, the granddaughter of Mrs. Washington. In many of the pictures of the Washington family she may be seen as a girl in a group with the General, Mrs. Washington, and her brother. Washington Parke Custis. There were two full sisters, Mrs. Law and Mrs. Peter. Mrs. Custis, the widow of Washington Parke Custis, married second. Dr. David Stuart, first of Hope Parish and then of Ossian Hall, Fairfax Co., Va. One of the sons of Lorenzo Lewis married a daughter of Beverly Johnson, of Baltimore, Md.

John Lewis, Sr., one of the original brothers, who emigrated from Wales to America, was born about 1640. He lived with the Mastyns, an ancient and wealthy family of Denbighshire, Wales. He died in Hanover Co., Va., 1726, where his will can be found on record. This John Lewis, Sr., was the great-great-grandfather of William Terrill Lewis, of Louisville, Winston Co., Miss., author of the Lewis genealogy, from which the dates of this article have been largely drawn. In his will John Lewis mentions the names of his children:

2. I. Rebecca Lewis3.

3. II. Abraham Lewis3.

4. III. Sarah Lewis3.

5. IV. Angelica Lewis’2.

6. V. David Lewis3.

7. VI. John Lewis2.

II. David Lewis2 (John1), Sr., fifth son of John I/iwis, Sr., was born in Hanover Co., Va., about 1685. Married, first, Miss Terrill, by whom he had eight children.

William, James and John Terrill were brothers of AngloNorman descent. They came to America about 1660, as huntsmen for King James II, of England, and settled in Gloucester Co., Va. For their dexterity in hunting they wire awarded by the King fifteen hundred acres of land, to be selected by themselves. The Terrills are of Anglo-Norman origin and descend from Sir Walter Tyrell, a Norman knight who came into England with William the Conqueror, A. D. 1066. David Lewis, Sr., fifth child of the emigrant, moved from Hanover Co., Va., and settled in Albemarle. Co., Va., about 1750, where he died in 1779. He married twice and left eleven children. William Terrill Lewis3, the eldest child of David Lewis, Sr., b. 1718, Hanover Co., Va., moved to Albemarle Co., Va., and was the third settler in that county. William Lewis, Sr., was one of the first men who volunteered their services in Albemarle Co., Va., to resist the high-handed measures of Lord Dunmore in 1774.

IV. Col. Robert Lewis4 (John3, John2, Robert1), of Belvoir, Albemarle Co., Va., son of Major John Lewis3 and Frances Fielding Lewis, his wife. Married Jane, daughter of Nicholas Meriwether. He died in 1757, leaving five children. Issue: I. Robert Lewis”. II. John Lewis”.

III. Charles Lewis”.

IV. Nicholas Lewis5.
V. William Lewis”.

V. William Lewis5 (Robert4, John2, John2, L’obert1) was captain in the State line during the Revolution. Married Lucy Meriwether, daughter of Thomas Meriwether, by whom he had three children:

I. Meriwether Lewis”.
II. Reuben Lewis”.
III. Jane Lewis”.

VI. Meriwether Lewis” (William5, Robert4, John2, John2, Robert1), generally called the “Oregon Explorer,” son of Captain William I.ewis, b. August 18, 1774. His father died when he was very young and he grew up under the care of his uncle, Col. Nicholas Lewis. Thomas Jefferson gives a very interesting sketch of Meriwether Lewis, who was for two years his private secretary. He says: “He was remarkable, even in infancy, for enterprise, boldness and discretion. When only eight years old he habitually went out in the dead of the night alone with his dogs into the forest to hunt the raccoon and opossum. At the age of thirteen he was put to the Latin school and continued until eighteen.”

At the age of twenty he engaged as a volunteer in the body of militia called out by General Washington for service in the western part of the United States. At twenty-three he was promoted to a captaincy. In 1792 Thomas Jefferson proposed to the American Philosophical Society that they should set on foot a subscription to engage some competent person to explore the region by ascending the Missouri, crossing the Stony Mountains and descending the nearest river to the Pacific. Captain Lewis, being then stationed at Charlottesville, warmly solicited Jefferson to obtain for him the execution of the expedition, although it was explained to him that the person engaged to go should be accompanied by a single companion only, to avoid exciting alarm among the Indians. This did not deter him, but the proposal did not succeed. In 1803 Congress approved the plan and voted a man of money to carry it into execution. Captain Lewis, who had been private secretary for Jefferson for two years, renewed his solicitations to have the direction of the party. His request was granted, and as it was necessary that he should have some competent person with him, in case of accident to himself, William Clarke, brother of General Rogers Clarke, was selected and approved, receiving a commission as captain. In April. 1803, a draft of his instructions was sent to Captain Lewis, and on the 5th of July, 1803. they left Washington and proceeded to Pittsburg. The two explorers. Lewis and Clarke, returned to St. Louis on the 23d of September. 180(>. having been gone a little over three years. The old accounts of the expedition tell us, “Never did a similar event excite more joy throughout the United States.” Captain Lewis was soon after appointed Governor of Louisiana and Captain Clarke a general of its militia, and agent of the United States for Indian affairs in the department. Captain Meriwether Lewis died October 11. 1809, aged 35.

The Virginia ‘Heraldry gives (February 11, 1906): “There seems to have been some doubt for a time as to which of Col. Robert Lewis’ sons married Catherine Fauntleroy. Some genealogists stated that it was Robert, but it has been proved that he married his cousin, Frances Lewis.”

I believe that there is now a record of the marriage of John Lewis- and Catherine Fauntleroy in Washington. However that may be, there seems to be no doubt that John is the Lewis who married Catherine.

V. John Lewis5 (Robert4, John2, John2, Robert1), son of Col. Robert Lewis and Jane Meriwether, his wife. Married Catherine Fauntleroy, daughter of Col. William Fauntleroy, of Naylor’s Hole (he mentions his daughter Catherine Lewis in his will, dated 1757), and his wife, Apphia Bushrod, and great-granddaughter of Col. Moore Fauntleroy, who emigrated to America before 1C43. and who was the twenty-first generation of descent from Henry I, of France (Browning’s “Americans of Royal Descent”).

In Deed Book No. 5, of the Albemarle County Records (pp. 191, 192 and 299), he describes himself as “John Lewis, of Halifax Co., Va., in three separate deeds, in which his wife Catherine joins as party to same. He qualified as executor to his father’s will in 1766 (Albemarle records). He left Halifax and went to reside on the Dan River, in North Carolina.

John Lewis and Catherine Fauntleroy, his wife, had issue:
I. Sallie Lewis”, b. 1761. Married (Aug. 10, 1780) Philip
Taylor. Mr. Williams, of Asheville, N. C., has an old
prayer-book that belonged to Philip Taylor, an ancestor of his, which contains the record of the marriage and the fact of her being the daughter of John and Catherine Lewis.

II. Apphia Fauntleroy Lewis”. Married David Allen, who lived on the Dan River, five miles from Danville, Pittsylvania Co., Va. A great-aunt, who died only a few years ago, by name Apphia Lewis Hightower, gave the facts to my cousin, with the names of the children. She spent much of her time at the old plantation on the Dan River with her grandparents. Apphia Fauntleroy Lewis and her husband, David Allen, had issue: I. Lewis Buckner Allen7, b. 1773; d. July 20, 1835, at Hickory Flat, near Florence, Ala. Married Mary Catherine Jones, daughter of Richard C. Jones and Elizabeth Crowley Ward, of Amelia Co., Va.

II. Julius Allen7, a bachelor, who inherited the old home on the Dan River and afterward left it to his nephew. David Allen.

III. Fauntleroy Allen7.

IV. Felix Allen7. Married Margaret White.
V. Christian Allen7. Married Sallie Fortson.

VI. Sallie Fauntleroy Allen7. Married Joseph Woodson.
VII. David Bushrod Allen7, moved to Mississippi.
VIII. Marv Meriwether Allen7. Married John Ross.

VII. Lewis Buckner Allen7 and Mary Catherine Jones left issue:

I. Elizabeth Crowley Allen”, b. 1817; d. March 5, 1849,
Alabama. Married (April 3, 1834) Captain Clinton
Heslep.

II. William Ward Allen”. Married and moved to Texas.

III. Ann Catherine Allen”. Married John Donalson; descend

ants live in Aberdeen, Miss.

IV. John Lewis Allen8. Married Josephine Middlebrook.

V. Apphia Lewis Allen”. Married John Hightower; descendants live in Texas. VI. Richard Allen”, d. single. VIII. Elizabeth Crowley Allen” was b. 1817: d. March 5, 1849. Married (April 3, 1834) Captain Clinton Heslep, b. December 10, 1810, in West Calm, Pa., and was the son of Joseph Heslep and wife, Susan Kendig. Joseph Heslep moved to Kentucky in 1813 and then to Alabama. He was very wealthy, having developed the first iron works in that part of the country. His sister Hanna married Bernard Van Leer, and they were the ancestors of the Van Leers of Nashville, Tenn.

Elizabeth Crowley Allen and her husband, Captain Clinton Heslep. left issue:

I. Mary Cornelia Heslep”, b. 1835. at Hickory Flat, near
Florence, Ala.: d. at Florence, 1902. Married John
Hood. Issue:
I. James Hood1″.
II. Lizzie Hood1″. Married Harris.

III. John Hood1″, of the United States Navy.

IV. Chalmers Hood1″.
V. Cole Hood1″.

VI. Clinton Hood1″.
VII. Mary- Hood1″.
II. Christian Heslep”, b. 1837, Alabama; d. 1890, St. Louis.
Mo.

III. Lewis Buckner Heslep”, b. June 22, 1838, Alabama; d. June 1, 1905, St. Louis. Mo. Married (Nov. 22, 1860) Griselda A. Seat, in Trenton, Tenn., a daughter of Capt. Pobert Seat, and his wife, Martha Gilchrist. Martha Gilchrist was a daughter of Dr. Allen Gilchrist, whose father, Thomas Gilchrist, married Martha Jones, sister of Gen. Willie Jones and Gov. Allen Jones, of Revolutionary fame, in North Carolina. Dr. Allen Gilchrist’s sister, Griselda Gilchrist, married Col. William Polk, of Tennessee, who was the father of Gen. Leonidas Polk, of Civil War fame.

IV. Joseph Heslep”, b. May 1, 1842, Florence, Ala.

V. Clinton Heslep”, b. Sept. 11, 1843, at Brown’s Port.
Perry Co., Tenn.; d. in Florence, after Civil War.

IX. Lewis Buckner Heslep” and Griselda A. Seat, his wife, had issue:

I. Cornelia Sallie Heslep1″, b. March 1, 1862, Trenton,
Tenn. Married (Sept. 22, 1880, St. Louis. Mo.)

Robert G. Hogan, b. in England and nephew of Hon. John Hogan, of St. Louis, who represented that city in Congress, and was known by the sobriquet of “Honest John.” II. Vernon Benton Heslep1″, b. April 15, 1864, in Columbus. Ky.

III. Lewis Buekner Heslep1″, b. Feb. 4. 1867, Trenton. Tenn.

X. Cornelia S. Heslep1″ married Robert G. Hogan, and had issue:

L Reginald R. Hogan11, lieutenant in United States Marine
Corps, b. Dec. 21, 1881, St. Louis, Mo.
II. Hazel Heslep Hogan11, b. June 28, 1883, St. Louis.
Married (April 5, 1903, in St. Louis) Ephraim Brevard Cockrell, son of former United States Senator
Francis Marion Cockrell.

III. Robert Cecil Hogan11. b. July 26, 1S85, St. Louis.

IV. Gladys Griselda Hogan11, b. March 7, 1889, St. Louis.
V. George Vernon Hogan11. b. March 10, 1895, in Webster

Grove, St. Louis Co., Mo.

HON. THOMAS LEWIS.

Thomas Lewis2, the second son of the founder, was born in Donegal, Ireland, April 27, 1718; died January 31, 1790. He was a man of strong and cultivated mind, of spirit and enterprise, and during the colonial period and the Revolutionary War rendered important services to the country. In 1746 he was appointed colonial surveyor of Augusta, and much of Washington’s great wealth was acquired by surveys of land under his authority and in common with him. He and Col. John Wilson represented the county in the House of Burgesses almost uninterruptedly from 1745 to 1767, and they voted in 1765 for Patrick Henry’s celebrated resolutions declaring that “this general assembly have the only exclusive right and power to lay taxes and impositions u;:on the inhabitants of this colony; that any efforts in an opposite direction are illegal, unconstitutional and unjust, and have a manifest tendency to destroy British as well as American freedom.”

In 1775 he was unanimously elected delegate to the Colonial Congress, and was one of the first to enroll his name among the “Sons of Liberty.” He was commissioner of the old confederacy of the thirteen colonies in 1778, to treat with the Indian tribes at the battle of Point Pleasant. He was a member of the convention which ratified the constitution of the United States.

After the Revolution, Gen. Washington made him a visit at Lewiston, in Rockingham, and there arranged their land claims. His descendants still own and reside upon his estate, Lewiston, near Port Republic, in the present county of Rockingham. He had a literary taste, and when not engaged in business was generally to be found in his library. He died at his residence in Rockingham County, on the Shenandoah River, three miles from Port Republic, January 31, 1790. In his will he fixed the place on his own estate where he wished to be buried, and desired that the burial service might be read from the Book of Common Prayer by his friend Peachy Gilmer. Married (January 26, 1749) Jane. the daughter of William Strother, Esq., of Stafford Co., Va., whose estate, opposite to Fredericksburg, joined the residence of the father of Gen. Washington, with whom (Gen. W.) she was a schoolmate and nearly of the same age.

Hon. Thomas Lewis2 and Jane Strother, his wife, had issue:

14. XII. Sophia Lewis3, b. 1775. Married John Carthrae, of Rockingham Co., Va.; removed to Missouri. Issue unknown.

15. XIII. William Benjamin Lewis2, b. 1778. Married Miss Hite, and at’ his death, 1842, left issue:

16. I. William H. Lewis4. Married Elizabeth, daughter of Capt. John Lewis, of Bath Co. Issue unknown.

17. II. Gen. George Lewis4. Married Miss Effinger.

18. III. Mary Jane Lewis4.

III. Margaret Ann Lewis3 (Thomas2, John1), b. 1751. Married MeClenahan. of Staunton, Va., by whom she left one child:

19. I. John MeClenahan4.

Her husband dying, she afterwards married Col. Wm. Bowyer, of Staunton, by whom at her death, in 1834, she left issue:

20. II. William C. Bowyer4.

21. III. Strother Bowyer4.

22. IV. Luke Bowyer4.

23. V. Peter C. Bowyer4.

24. VI. Matilda Bowyer4.

III. Agatha Lewis3 (Thomas-, John1), daughter of Col. Thomas Lewis and Jane Strother, his wife, b. 1753; d. 1836, aged 83. Married, first, Capt. Frogg, d. leaving one daughter; she left one daughter.

Agatha Lewis married, second, Col. John Stuart, of Greenbrier Co., Va., by whom she left issue:

25. 1. Elizabeth Frogg4, b. 1773. Issue by second marriage:

26. II. Charles A. Stuart4, b. 1775.

27. III. Lewis Stuart4, b. 1777.

28. IV. Margaret Stuart4, b. 1779.

29. V. Jane Stuart4, b. 17—.

I shall complete the Stuart lineage before taking up Charles Lewis’s branch:

IV. Elizabeth Frogg4 (Agatha3, Thomas-, John1), daughter of Agatha Lewis and Capt. Frogg. .Married Major Isaac Estill, of Monroe Co. and left issue.
30. I. Wallace Estill’.

31. II. John Estill”.

32. III. Estill”.

33. IV. Agnes Estill”.

IV.- Charles A. Stuart4 (Agatha Lewis2, Thomas2, John1), son of Agatha Lewis and John Stuart, of Greenbrier Co., Va. Married Miss Robertson, of Augusta Co., Va., and had following issue:

34. I. Robertson Stuart5. Married Miss Bradford, of Orange, Va.

35. II. James Stuart”. Married Margaret Lewis. Issue unknown.

36. III. Elizabeth Stuart5, single.

IV. Lewis Stuart4 (Agatha Lewis2, Thomas2, John1), son of Agatha Lewis and Col. John Stuart, b. 1777. Married Sarah Lewis and had issue:

37. 1. Rachael Stuart”. Married Gen. Davis, Mississippi.

38. II. Jane Stuart5. Married Samuel Price.

39. III. Agnes Stuart”. Married Charles L. Peyton.

40. IV. Charley Stuart5, unmarried.

41. V. Margaret Stuart”. Married James Davis.

42. VI. Lewis Stuart5, unmarried.

43. VII. Henry Stuart5, unmarried.

44. VIII. Andrew Stuart5, unmarried.

[V. Margaret Stuart4 (Agatha Lewis2, Thomas2, John1), daughter of Agatha Lewis and Col. John Stuart, b. 1779. Married Col. Andrew Lewis,* of Point Pleasant, 1802; he d. 1833, leaving issue:

45. I. Agnes Lewis5, b. 1805.

46. II. John Lewis5, b. 1807 ; d. 1811.

47. III. Elizabeth Lewis5, b. ;d. 1812.

48. IV. Mary J. Lewis5, b. 1811. Married Charles R. Baldwin in 1833; d. 1835.

49. V. John Stuart Lewis”.

50. VI. Margaret Lewis5, b ;d. 1819.

*note.—Col. Andrew Lewis3 (Charles3, John1) was son of Col. Charles Lewis and Sarah Murray.

51. VII. Sarah Frances Lewis5, b. 1817. Married Dr. Creigh.

of Lewisburg, W. Va. Issue unknown.

52. VIII. Elizabeth Lewis5, b. 1819.

53. IX. Andrew Lewis5, el. young.

IV. Jane Stuart4 (Agatha Lewis2, Thomas2, John1), daughter of Agatha Lewis and Col. John Stuart, b. 17—. Married Major Robert Crockett, of Wythe Co., W. Va., and left the following

Maria Crockett5. Married Judge James E. Brown.
Agatha Crockett”. Married James McGavoc, and
left issue.

Charles Crockett”. Married Mary Bowyer, of Botetourt and left issue.
Stuart Crockett”. Married Margaret Taylor, of Smyth Co., and left issue.

Frank Crockett”. Married .

Gustavus Crockett”. Married Eliza Erskine.
Augustine Crockett3, d. unmarried.

V. Agatha Estill5 (Elizabeth4, Agatha Lewis2, Thomas2, John1), daughter of Elizabeth Frogg and Major Isaac Estill. Married Henry Erskine of Greenbrier and had issue:

Elizabeth Erskine8. Married Gustavus Crockett.
Margaret Lewis Erskine”. Married Charles S. Gay, of Richmond, Va., who removed to Augusta Co.,
Va., and had issue:
Charles Gay7, killed in battle Malvern Hill.
Fanny Gay7. Married Richard M. Catlett, a lawyer of Staunton, Va.
Elizabeth Gay7.
Erskine Gay7, unmarried.
Agatha Gay7.
William Gay7.

Carrie Gay7. Married W. M. Allen, of Staunton, Va.
Margaret Gay7, d. young.
William Lewis Gay7, d. young.
John Robertson Gay7, d. young.

Jane Erskine8. Married William Boyd, a lawyer of Buchanan, in Botetourt Co., Va., and had issue

“4. I. Henry Boyd7.

75. II. Alice Boys Boyd7.

76. III. William Boyd7.

77. IV. Andrew Boyd7.

V. Rachel Stuart5 (Lewis4, Agatha Lewis3. Thomas2, John1), daughter of Lewis Stuart and Sarah Lewis, his wife. Married Gen. Davis, of Mississippi, and had issue:

78. I. Runnels Davis5.

79. II. Charles Davis5.

80. III. Sarah Davis”.

81. IV. Mary Davis”.

82. V. Alfred Davis”.

83. VI. Davis”.

84. VII. Davis”.

V. Jane Stuart5 (Lewis4, Agatha Lewie3, Thomas2, John1), daughter of Lewis Stuart and Sarah Lewis, his wife. Married Samuel Price, of Lewisburg, W. Va., formerly Lieutenant-Governor of Virginia and in 1876 United States Senator for West Virginia, and at her death, in 187:I. left issue:

85. I. Margaret Price”.

86. II. Mary Price”.

87. III. John Price”.

88. IV. Sally Price”.

89. V. Jennie Price”.

90. VI. Lewis Price”.

V. Agnes Stuart5 (Lewis4, Agatha Lewis2, Thomas2, John1), daughter of Lewis Stuart and Sarah Lewis, his wife. Married Charles L. Peyton, son of C. Peyton and a great nephew of President Jefferson, of Greenbrier Co., W. Va., and had issue:

91. I. Thomas Peyton”.

92. II. Elizabeth Peyton”.

93. III. Lewis Peyton”.

94. IV. Charles Peyton”.

95. V. Harry Peyton”.

96. VI. Caroline Peyton”.

V. Maria Crockett” (Jane Stuart4. Agatha Lewis2, Thomas2, John1), daughter of Jane Stuart and Major Robert Crockett, of Wythe Co., Va. Married Judge James E. Brown, by whom she had issue:

97. I. William Brown”, d. unmarried.

98. II. Jane Brown”, d. unmarried.

99. III. Fanny Peyton Brown”. Married Col. Joseph F.

Kent. She d. 1861, leaving issue: I. Betty Kent7. Married George M. Harrison.

II. John Kent7, unmarried.

III. Jane Kent7. Married Howe Peyton Cochran.

IV. Emma Kent7. Married Jno. 0. Yates.
V. Alexander Kent7, d. unmarried.

After the death (1861) of Mrs. Kent, Col. Joseph F. Kent
married, second, Virginia Frances Peyton, b. 1841. Issue:
I. Joseph Kent7.
II. Susan Peyton Kent7.

III. Mary Preston Kent7.

II. Susan Peyton Kent7. Married (6th of January, 1904) by Rev. Mercer P. Logan, D. D., at St. John’s Episcopal Church, Wytheville, Va., to Mr. Edmund Fontaine Broun, of Charleston, W. Va.*

IV. Alexander Brown, fourth child of Judge Brown, was a most promising young man, who, after graduating with distinction at the University of Virginia, commenced the law practice in Wythe, hut died soon after.

The Baltimore Sun of August 13, 1905, has the following article on:

THE OLD HOME OF NELLY CUSTIS.

Of the many old Colonial Homes in Virginia which are still in a splendid state of preservation, perhaps none can claim greater historical interest or more pleasing associations than does old Woodlawn Mansion, the

‘Being in Wytheville that winter I (L. Pecquet du Bellet) was at the wedding. I was at the reception and handed all the telegrams of congratulations to the bride and groom. A lovelier bride I have never seen. The parlors were crowded with guests from various States of the Union. The presents were very handsome, costing several thousand dollars.

The mother of the bride is a very dear friend of mine. I receive some very interesting letters from her. (Peyton Family, Hayden’s Virginia Genealogies, pp. 461-566.)

original home of Mrs. Eleanor Custis Lewis, nee Nelly Custis, the adopted daughter of General George Washington. Since Woodlawn was built one hundred years have rolled into the great abyss of the past, yet it stands to day a complete and solid result of fine old-time architecture, in no respect reduced from its ancient splendor or magnificence.

Woodlawn is located in lower Fairfax County, lying directly on the road known as the Alexandria pike, and an hour’s drive from that old city of Alexandria, where centers so much of history, sentiment and anecdote concerning America’s greatest general, the illustrious Washington. The commanding site upon which this mansion is built was formerly a part of the Mount Vernon estate, but, with the acres surrounding it. was given by General Washington to his adopted daughter, Nelly Custis, upon her marriage to his favorite nephew, Lawrence. Lewis, afterwards Major Lewis of Woodlawn. Its architecture is of Colonial date, being one of the finest specimens of that period and better known as the Georgian architecture. Within the long drawing-room of that historic mansion, on the last anniversary of the birthday of her devoted foster-father. Nelly was made the bride of Lawrence Lewis, Washington himself giving the blushing young beauty away to the beloved nephew, afterwards Major Lewis, of Woodlawn. This event took place on the 22nd of February. 1799. Mrs. Eleanor Custis Lewis sleeps to-day beneath the marble shaft that marks her grave at Mount Vernon, only a few feet away from the tomb containing the honored dust of her beloved hero and foster-father. Upon this monument the noble traits of this gentlewoman are thus written:

“Sacred to the memory of Eleanor Parke Custis. granddaughter of Mrs. Washington and adopted daughter of General Washington. Reared under the roof of the Father of His Country, this lady was not more remarkable for her beauty of person than for the superiority of her mind. She lived to be admired and died to be regretted, July 15. 1852, in the seventyfourth year of her age.”

Woodlawn has changed owners many times, and is the property to-day of Mr. Paul Kester, the popular young playwright.

Since writing the above I am the happy recipient of the following extract from Mrs. Penrose N. Ions, of San Angelo, Texas, taken from the “History of Huguenots,” by Samuel Smiles:

Jean Louis was forced to flee from France, during the persecutions of the Huguenots, which followed the revocation of the “Edict of Nantes.” He came of a Protestant family of wealth, position and influence, of the town of Castred. He made good his escape to England, and as the English were in need of experienced officers in Flanders, he was gladly weleomed and given a commission as Captain in Queen Anne’s Army in the “Low Countries.” For his gallantry and valuable services he was made Field Marshal, Earl of Ligenter and Baron of Greniskilin.

He was with Marlborough in Flanders, and attracted his attention at the storming of Liege. At Blenheim he was the only captain of hisregiment who survived. At Kenice (or Menice) he led the grenadiers in storming the counters. He fought at Malplaquet. where he was made Major of Brigade. He was in all of Marlborough’s battles, and at Dettingen as Lieutenant-General, he won still higher distinction. The intrepidity with which he led the British Infantry won the battle of Fontenoy. Placed in command of the British forces in Flanders, he was taken prisoner at the engagement of Sanfield. Restored to England he was made Commander-in-Chief, and Colonel of the Fort Guards. During his career, he was in nineteen battles and twenty-three sieges.

GENERAL JOHN LEWIS.

The first General John Lewis had a son- named :he was the eldest and died early. He had rented in fee simple, for a hundred years, the estate of Lord Dunraven, in Ireland. John Lewis, the eldest son of the dead man, succeeded to the titles and estates and settled in Ireland. That John Lewis went to Scotland and married Margaret, the daughter of Lord Lynn, who lived on Loch (Lake) Lynn.

John Lewis, then an earl, and his wife lived happily for a few years. Then the profligate Earl of Dunraven wanted to give (rent) the estate to a boon companion. He came with an armed hand to drive John Lewis away. He fired into the house and killed a brother of Lewis, who was ill in bed. John Lewis, who had been absent, returned, and, seeing the armed Earl, he shot him dead. English soldiers were sent to arrest John Lewis for killing the Earl of Dunraven, but the Irish of the whole country arose and helped him to escape to the west coast. All the landlords near John Lew-is armed their followers and escorted him to the coast, and he escaped to France. Feeling unsafe in France, he made his way alone and on foot over to the mountains in Spain. Relatives knelt to King George and begged a pardon for John Lewis. As he was safe in Spain and the King could not get him, he thought to make good use of him and try to get the Indians to kill him, so he (the King) said John Lewis should lose titles and property, but if he would go to Virginia, and go far beyond all of his good subjects, he (the King) would forgive and rent him a tract of land, 100,000 acres, provided he built a fort and became a shield to all of his good and loyal subjects. So, as he could not help himself, John Lewis came to Virginia. His brother brought over the family of John Lewis and a shipload of tenants—MeHughs (now called MeCuea) and McLungs and many other Valley families, all Presbyterians. As soon as they got to Virginia they were on a level with John Lewis.

John Lewis had the following children: Samuel, Thomas, Andrew, William, Margaret Anne, Charles and Alice. Alice married Mr. Madison and was the mother of Bishop Madison. Mr. Madison was the first and only member of the family to belong to the Protestant Episcopal Church.

Thomas Lewis married Jane Strother. His sketch has been given above.

II. Col. Charles Lewie2 (John1), the youngest son of the founder, John Lewis, and Margaret Lynn, his wife; was killed October 10, 1774, at the battle of Point Pleasant. Married Sarah Murray, an English lady, half-sister of Col. Cameron, of Bath Co., Va. She was a near relative of Linlev Murray, who wrote the grammar.

Col. Charles Lewis left following issue:

3. L Elizabeth Lewis2, b. 1762 : d. single.

4. II. Margaret Lewis2, b. 1765.

5. III. John Lewis2, b. 1766.

6. IV. Marv Lewis2, b. 1768.

7. V. Thomas Lewis2, b. 1771.

8. VI. Andrew Lewis2, b. 1772.

9. VII. Charles Lewis2, b. 1774.

III. Col. John Lewis3 (Charles2, John1), son of Col. Charles Lewis and Sarah Murray, his wife, of Bath Co., Va. Married Rachel Miller, of Augusta Co., and left at his death, 1843. the following issue:

16. VII. John Lewis4. Married Mary J.’Lewie, daughter of

William Benjamin Lewis, of Rockingham Co., Va., and Miss Hite. W. B. Lewis’ was youngest son of Thomas Lewis2 and Jane Strother. Issue unknown.

17. VIII. Elizabeth Lewis4. Married Wm. H. Lewis, son of

Wm. Benjamin Lewis and M. Hite. Issue unknown.

18. IX. Hannah Lewis4, unmarried.

19. X. Rachel Lewis4, d. unmarried.

III. Charles Lewis3 (Thomas3. John1), son of Thomas Lewis2 and Jane Strother, his wife; b. 1772; d. 1832, near Port Republic. Rockingham Co., Va. Married Anne Hance. of the Eastern Shore of Maryland. PTe inherited the homestead on the Shenandoah River in what is now Rockingham Co., Va. Charles Lewis and Anne Hance had issue:

I. Thomas Lewis4. Married Delia Fletcher. Issue:
I. Anne Lewis”.
IF. Samuel Hance Lewis4.

III. Charles Chambers Lewis4. Married Mary Allen and had
following issue:
I. Charles Chambers Lewis”.
II. James Lewis”.

III. Andrew Lewis”.

IV. Mary Lewis”.

V. Henry Clay Lewis”. VI. William Lewis”. VII. George Kemper Lewis”. IV. Mary Lewis4. Married Dr. Nusco Chambers, of Clinton Co., Ohio.

V. Margaret Strother Lewis4. Married Rev. C. B. Tippett, of Maryland.

IV. Gen. Samuel Hance Lewis4 (Charles2, Thomas2, John1), son of Charles Lewis3 and Anne Hance, a prominent citizen of Virginia, was a graduate of Washington College (now Washington and Lee), a man of great literary tastes, profoundly religious, of high moral worth, and beloved friend of Bishops Meade and Cobb. While exceedingly genial among his intimate friends, he was a man remarkable for his strict religious observances, for his stern deportment in the presence of frivolity, and for his iron will and high integrity, both in private as well as in public life. He represented his county in the Legislature for many years, and his name is dear to the church in Virginia, in whose councils he was so long a ruling spirit. He died at his home, Lewiston, Rockingham Co., of cancer of the neck, in 1868.

He married, first, Nancy Lewis, the granddaughter of Col. Charles Lewis, killed at the battle of Point Pleasant; second. Anna Maria Lomax, daughter of Judge J. T. Lomax, of Fredericksburg, Va.; third, Mrs. Fry. No issue by this marriage.

Issue by first marriage:

I. Charles H. Lewis”, United States Minister to Portugal. 1873. Married a daughter of Judge Lomax and had issue of one daughter. TI. John Francis Lewis”.

III. Samuel H. Lewis5. Married a Miss Dabney.

IV. Elizabeth Lewis5. Married Rev. J. C. Wheat.
V. Mary Lewis5, d. unmarried.

VI. Anne Lewis5, d. unmarried.
VII. Margaret Lynn Lewis5, d. unmarried.
VIII. William Meade Lewis5, d. unmarried.
Issue by second marriage:

IX. Charlotte Lewis5. Married Beverly Botts and has issue.

X. Lunsford Lomax Lewis5.
XL Cornelia Lewis5, d. unmarried.
XII. Anne Maria Lewis5, d. unmarried.

V. John Francis Lewis5 (Samuel4, Charles’, Thomas2, John1), second son of Gen. Samuel Hance Lewis and Nancy Lewis, his first wife. He inherited all of his father’s sterling qualities, and was one of the leading men of his day in Virginia. Of magnificent physical proportions—six feet three inches tall—his mental attributes were quite as remarkable. He was especially noted for his reckless bravery, his impulsive denunciation of wrong, and his utter disregard for public opinion when he considered it to be in error. His first appearance in public life was when he was sent as delegate to the convention at the outbreak of the Civil War, which was to decide whether Virginia would secede from the Union or not. He was a strong Union man and went there instructed to vote against secession, which he did to the bitter end, saying they might hang him, as they threatened to do. but he would never sign the ordinance. He was the only man in this convention who did not sign it. There were several of the West Virginia members, who did not sign, but they left at once for their homes within the Northern line. A hundred times the ordinance was thrust into his face, but he invariably replied, “I will die first.” That he was not killed seems almost a miracle. Many of the best and staunchest Union men gave way to the pressure and signed the ordinance. Samuel McDowel More was burned in effigy, Jubal A. Early was threatened with mob law, yet they both yielded to the overwhelming excitement. John F. Lewis alone remained at his post, true to the last to his firm conviction that to do so would bring trouble and ruin to his State. His integrity and honesty of purpose were so well known and so well appreciated that they seemed to be a shield to his open and often reckless Union utterances, and while others were imprisoned, or shot down on the roadside, he was spared to save his State from the internal strife which so long retarded the happiness and prosperity of many of the more southern states. In 1869 he was elected Lieutenant Governor, and in November of that year was elected to the United States Senate. To quote from Rev. 0. S. Bunting, late of Petersburg, Va., and a dear friend: “From heel to crown he was every inch a man—brave, true, sincere, courteous in the truest sense, generous, positive. Agree with him some did not, but admire him all must. All over the State he was honoured as extremely few public men ever were.” He was born 1818. Married (October 26. 1842) Serena Helen Sheffey. b. 1823, daughter of the Hon. Daniel Sheffey, of Staunton. Va. They had issue:

I. Daniel Sheffey Lewis”, b. Oct. 17, 1843. Married Isabella Botts, daughter of Hon. John Minor Botts, of Richmond, Va. Issue:
I. Minor Botts Lewis7.
II. John F. Lewis7.
III. Daniel Sheffey Lewis7.
IV. Beverley Lewis7.

V. Lunsford Lewis7.
VI. Archie Lewis7.
II. Nannie Lewis”, b. 1845. Married Hon. John Ambler Smith, of Dinwiddie Co., Va. Their descendants are in Volume I, Chapters VI and VII.

III. Maria Hanson Lewis5, b. 1848. Married Penrose N. Ions,

of Fairfax, Va. No issue. Mr. Ions, agent Insurance Co., Hartford, Conn. They reside San Angelo. Texas.

IV. Serena Helen Lewis5, b. 1850. Married Lewis Stuart Davis, of Greenbrier. W. Va. No issue.

V. Mary Louise Lewis5, b. Sept. 16, 1857. Married Dr. Edwin Gibbs, of Lexington, Va. Issue:
I. John Lewis Gibbs7.
II. Nannie Lewis Gibbs7.

VI. John Francis Lewis”, b. Sept. 6, 1860. Married (Jan. 10,
1883) Anna Harnsberger, b. Dec. 1, 1861. They reside at Lynwood, Va., and have issue:
I. Helen Lewis7, b. Sept, 8, 1888.

II. Hanson Lewis7, b. May 11, 1893.

III. Anna Lewis7, b. May 4, 1896.

IV. Katherine Stuart Lewis7, b. April 26, 1898.

VII. Samuel Hance Lewis5, b. March 9, 1869. Married Editha Clay, of Lynchburg, ATa. Issue: 1. Samuel Hance Lewis7.

Daniel Sheffey Lewis5, oldest son of the late Hon. John F. Lewis5 and Serena Helen Sheffey, his wife, b. October 17, 1843, graduated from the Law Department of the University of Virginia in the year 1867. Married Isabella McLaine, youngest daughter of the late Hon. John Minor Botts. In 1876 he was the Republican candidate for Congress in the Fifth Congressional District of Virginia and was defeated by the Hon. George G. Cabell, of Danville, Va. In 1882 was appointed by President Arthur United States District Attorney for the Western District of Virginia, which place Mr. Lewis held until President Cleveland came into office, when he was removed to make way for the Hon. H. C. Allen, of Woodstock.

In 1886 he bought the Spirit of the VcUley, a newspaper published in Harrisonburg, Va., which he has published up to the present date (1906). For sixteen years he held the position of treasurer of the town of Harrisonburg and was reelected on June 14, 1904.

V. Samuel Hance Lewis5 (Samuel4. Charles8, Thomas3. John1), third son of Gen. Samuel Hance Lewis and Nancy Lewis. his first wife. Married Louisa Dabney. Issue:

I. Lucy Lewis”.
IL. Sal lie Lewis”.

III. Elizabeth Lewis”.

IV. Ellen Lewis”.

V. Samuel Hance Lewis”. Married (Dee. 1900) Agnes

de Leon Moses. Issue: I. Margaret Lynn Lewis7.

VI. John E. Walter Lewis”.
VII. Charles Lewis5.

VIII. Harry Lewis”.
IX. Sue Lewis”.

V. Elizabeth Rachel Lewis5 (Samuel4, Charles2, Thomas2, John1), duaghter of Gen. Samuel Hance Lewis and Nancy Lewis, his first wife. Married Rev. James Clinton Wheat. They have issue:

[. Dr. Samuel Lewis Wheat5, d. Dec., 1903. Married (1886)

Ella Rutherford. She came from Scotland. Issue: I. Elizabeth Lewis Wheat7, b. Oct, 27, 1887. I [. James Clinton Wheat7, b. Feb., 1888.

III. Frances Rutherford Wheat7, b. , 1889.

II. John Wheat”.

III. Eleanor C. Wheat5. She lives at the old home of Gen.

Samuel Hance Lewis, Lynwood, Rockingham Co., Va.

IV. James Clinton Wheat5. Married (June, 1895) Gertrude

Ross, daughter of J. M. Ross, of U. S. A. Issue:
I. Clarence Ross Wheat7. Mr. Wheat resides in Atlanta,
Ga.

Issue by second marriage, Anna Maria Lomax:
V. Charlotte Thornton Lewis”, daughter of Gen. Samuel H.
Lewis. Mamed Beverley B. Botts, son of Hon. John
Minor Botts.

VI. Lunsford Lomax Lewis5.

VII. Cornelia J. Lewis”, b. 1847; d. 1871.
VIII. Anna Maria Lewis5. Married Charles Maurice Smith,
of Richmond. Va. (Descendants Volume I, Chapters
VI and VII.)

V. Charlotte Thornton Lewis5 (Samuel4, Charles2, Thomas2, John1), daughter of Gen. Samuel H. Lewis and Anna Maria Lomax, his second wife. Married Beverley B. Botts, son of Hon. John Minor Botts. They have issue: I. Anna Lewis Botts”. II. Mary Beverley Botts”, b. Nov. 7, 1869, Culpeper Co., Va. Married (June 28, 1899, in Washington, D. C.) John Minor Botts Hoxey, b. April 17, 1869, Paterson, New Jersey. Issue: I. John Minor Botts Hoxey7, Jr., b. April 25, 1900, Brooklyn, N. Y.

II. Dorothea Douglas Hoxey, b. Jan. 26, 1903, Brooklyn, N. Y.; d. Feb. 6, 1903. V. Judge Lunsford Lewis5 (Samuel4, Charles3, Thomas2, John1) , son of Gen. Samuel Hance Lewis and Anna Maria Lomax, his second wife; he was Republican nominee for Governor of Virginia during the fall of 1905. Married, first, Rose Botts. daughter of John Minor Botts; second, Miss Jane Looney, of Memphis, Tenn.

I met Mrs. Lewis in Richmond, Va., June, 1904. To her kind and gracious invitation I am indebted for spending a delightful evening at the Woman’s Club. I had the pleasure of meeting Mrs. Stonewall Jackson the same evening. I met Mrs. Lewis several times during my visit in Richmond, and she was always as courteous as any lady I had the pleasure of meeting at the Capital City of the Old Dominion.

At the Woman’s Club I was introduced to Mrs. Willford. She pressed my hands and remarked: “You must be the daughter of Catherine Ambler Moncure. 1 visited her during my wedding tour in Paris, France, and remember seeing you as a child.”

Judge Lunsford Lomax Lewis and Rose Botts, his first wife, have issue:

I. Minor Lewis”. II. Mary Willer Lewis”. I have had some very interesting letters from Miss Lewis. III. Samuel Hance Lewis”.

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