Fauntleroy of Virginia Family History

Fauntleroy Family

Fauntleroy Family

Fauntleroy coat-of-arms is described: From Virginia, Prominent Families, Vol. 1-4

On a wreath of the same colour, a fieur-de-lis ar, between two angels’ wings, displayed azure. Shields three infants’ heads coupled, argent, cringed or.
Motto: “Enfant du sor.”
The first known of the name of Fauntleroy was living in Dorset, England, in 1721. An undying tradition ascribes the paternity of the family to John, King of Frances, who was a captive at Windsor Castle, from 1356 to 1364, by a morganatic marriage with Catherine Grandeson, Countess of Salisbury, a member of the Courtenay family.
The first from whom an unbroken line was traced was John Fauntleroy, who married Joanna Whalley, of Purbick. Issue:
I. John Fauntleroy((2)). Married Elizabeth Wadham.
II. William Fauntleroy((2)), D. D., of Oxford.
III. Elizabeth Fauntleroy((2)), Abbess of Almsbury.
IV. Agnes Fauntleroy((2)). Married Lord Stourton.
V. Tristam Fauntleroy((2)). Married Joan, daughter of William, second Lord Stourton. His will was dated 1639. By the marriage of Tustam Fauntleroy and Joan Stourton, the family descends from the titled families of Stourton and Berkeley, as follows:
Robert Fitz Hardinge received Berkeley Castle by forfeiture, 1170, from Roger de Berkeley. Issue:
Maurice Hardinge, b. 1120, married Alice Berkeley, the daughter of the vested owner. He had Thomas of Berkeley, of Berkeley Castle, married Joan Saumasey, d. 1243. Issue.
Maurice Berkeley married Isabelle Crown, daughter of an English baron and his wife, Isabel de Valence (or Valem), half maternal sister to Henry the Third, by the second marriage of his mother, Isabelle, with William de Lusignan, ninth count de la Marche.
Miss Strickland traces her lineage through the Courtenay family to Louis le Gros. He had issue:
I. Thomas Berkeley, first Lord, who married, 1264, Joan Ferras, daughter of William de Ferras, Earl of Derby. Their daughter, Alice, married Ralph de Stourton, in 1300. Issue:
I. William de Stourton. Married Joan, daughter of Sir William Vernon.
II. John Stourton. Married a daughter of Lord Bassett.
III. William Stourton. Married Elizabeth Moigne, in 1402, daughter of Sir John Moigne. (Sir John was created baron, 1448; married Margarite, daughter of Sir John Wadham.)
IV. William Stourton. Married Margaret Chiddock, daughter of Sir John Chiddock.
V. Joan Stourton. Married Tristam Fauntleroy, in 1539. Issue:
I. John Fauntleroy, of Crondall, d. 1598. Married -.
II. William Fauntleroy, d. 1625. Married Frances -.
III. John Fauntleroy. Married Ph£be Wilkinson, in 1609.
Moore Fauntleroy Pedigree

Moore Fauntleroy Pedigree

IV. Moore Fauntleroy, came to Virginia in 1642, built Maylor’s Hold, Richmond Co., Va.; member of the House of Burgesses in 1644 to 1659; married Mary Hill. From this marriage, all of the name in Virginia descended. He sponsored a great number of early immigrants to America, his land holdings were very large. In the early days of the Colonies the British Crown awarded land grants for sponsoring immigrants.  They have intermarried with the Turners, of Kinlock, and Walsingham, the Beverleys, the Paynes of Warrenton, and some branches of the Carters (Carter Family, Chapter VII, Volume II). Landon Carter of Pittsylvania married Judith Fauntleroy.

Miss Betsey Fauntleroy, a granddaughter of Moore Fauntleroy, the emigrant, was one of the lady-loves of Gen’l George Washington. She did not smile on him, however, but married Dr. William Brockenbrough, of Tappahannock. She was grandmother of Judge William Brockenbrough, of the Court of Appeals, Richmond, Va. The house of President Jefferson Davis, during the Civil War, now the Confederate Museum, in Richmond, Va., was built and owned by him. (Volume I, Chapter VIII.)
Gen’l Thomas Turner Fauntleroy, another distinguished descendant of Moore Fauntleroy and Mary Hill; b. Richmond Co., Va., October 6, 1796; d. September 12, 1883. He was Colonel of the first Reg. U. S. Dragoons. As soon as Virginia seceded he promptly resigned, and offered himself to the Confederacy; he was made General. Of all the officers who resigned from the U. S. Army and came south, he held the highest rank. Married Ann Magdelin Magill, youngest child of Col. Charles Magill, and his second wife, Mary Buckner, née Thruston. Issue:
I. Charles Magill Fauntleroy, b. August 21, 1822; d. July 29, 1889.
II. Thomas Turner Fauntleroy.
III. Alfred Fauntleroy, d. in childhood.
IV. Mary Fauntleroy. Married Mr. Barnes.
V. Catherine Fauntleroy. Married Col. Whittlery.
VI. Archibald Magill Fauntleroy, b. July 8, 1836; d. 1886
I. Charles Magill Fauntleroy, b. 1822, entered U. S. Navy, but resigned in 1861, and entered the Confederate S. Army, and was appointed Inspector General, under Gen’l Joseph E. Johnston; married three times: first, Janet Knox of Leesburg, Loudoun Co., Va., in 1847; dying, she left one child:
I. Janet Fauntleroy. Married Powell Harrison, of Loudoun Co., Va.
Thomas Turner Fauntleroy, second son of Gen’l Fauntleroy and Mary Buckner Thruston, his wife, practiced law in Winchester, and was junior member of the law firm of Barton .& Williams. After the close of the Civil War, he was appointed Judge of the Va. Court of Appeals, which office he held for twelve years, during which time he lived in Richmond; later he removed with his family to St. Louis, where he now resides.
Judge Thomas T. Fauntleroy married, in Winchester, Va., in 1851, Ann Hite Williams, daughter of Philip Williams, a leading lawyer of the State, and Ann Maury, née Hite. One year later she died, leaving a babe of only a few weeks, called Philip Williams Fauntleroy, who was most affectionately raised by his stepmother, Williams. He first studied law, later for the Protestant Episcopal Ministry. He has had charge of a church in St. Louis for many years; married Miss Battle, and has several children.
Judge Thomas Turner Fauntleroy married, second, Elizabeth Smith Hite, daughter of Cornelius Baldwin Hite, Sr., of Belle Grove, and Augusta Elizabeth, née Smith, daughter of Col. Augustin Charles Smith, of Winchester, Va. Issue will be given elsewhere.
III. Mary Fauntleroy, eldest daughter of Gen’l Fauntleroy, and Ann Magdalen Magill, his wife; married Dr. Joseph Barnes, U. S. Army, Surgeon General, of Washington. Issue:
I. Joseph Barnes, Jr.
II. Anna Barnes.
IV. Katharine (called Kate) Fauntleroy, daughter of Gen’l Thomas T. Fauntleroy, married Major Whittlesey, U. S. A., for some years in charge of the “Soldier’s Home,” near Washington, D. C. Afterwards, was sent to a post in Washington Territory (now a State), where he died, leaving a widow and two sons. Mrs. Whittlesey has since died, her obituary appearing in a Winchester paper:
Winchester, Va., May 28, 1906.-A telegram was received here to-day from Seattle, Wash., announcing the death of Mrs. Katharine Whittlesey, widow of Major J. H. Whittlesey, of the United States Army, and member of an old and distinguished Virginia family, her father being General Thomas T. Fauntleroy, of this city. Two sons and one sister, Mrs. Barnes, of Washington, survive.
I. Charles Whittlesey. Married -, and lives in Tacoma, Washington.
II. William Whittlesey. Married -, and lives in Seattle, Washington.
V. Dr. Archibald Magill Fauntleroy, youngest son of Gen’l Thomas T. Fauntleroy, and Ann Magdalen, née Magill, resigned from the U. S. Army, and was appointed Medical Director and Surgeon on the staff of Gen’l Johnston; married Sally Conrad, the beautiful daughter of Robert L. Conrad, an eminent lawyer in Winchester, Va.; died leaving a widow and many children.
IV. Archibald Magill, son of Col. Charles Magill and Mary Buckner Thruston, his wife, married Mary Jane Page, of Bosewell, Gloucester Co., Va.; daughter of Mann Page, and Elizabeth Nelson, and granddaughter of Gov. Page and Gov. Nelson. Mr. and Mrs. Archibald Magill lived at “Barley Wood,” a few miles from Winchester, Va. No issue.
V. John Samuel Magill, son of Col. Charles Magill and Mary Buckner Thruston, married Mary Ann Glass. They lived at the “Meadows,” a handsome estate near Winchester. He was a lawyer, and represented Frederick Co., in the Legislature, several years. He had one child:
I. Mary Elizabeth Magill, d. in childhood.
VI. Alfred Thruston Magill, son of Col. Charles Magill and Mary Buckner Thruston, was Professor of Medicine in the University of Va.; at the time, his wife’s father, Judge Henry St. George Tucker, was Professor of Law there. Dr. Magill was not only distinguished in his profession, but honored and loved for his high character; d. June 12, 1837, aged 33 years. Married Ann Evelina Hunter Tucker, daughter of Judge Henry St. George Tucker, of the Court of Appeals of Va., brother of Judge Beverley Tucker, and half brother of John Randolph of Roanoke. Issue:
I. Fanny Bland Magill, b. December 17, 1828; d. May 13, 1901. Married Rev. James Robert Graham, October 3, 1853. He was in charge of the Presbyterian Church, in Winchester, which position he occupied until his death. He left one daughter, Evelina Tucker Magill, and five sons. Three of the latter are Presbyterian ministers, one a physician, and one a druggist, in St. Louis.
II. Mary Tucker Magill was a woman of culture, and wrote several books.
III. Evelina Magill. Married William Levin Powell, son of Mr. Humphrey Powell, of Loudoun Co., Va., and brother of Mrs. Randolph Tucker; she d. 1901, leaving one son:
I. Levin Powell, who graduated at the University of Va. in 1901.
IV. Virginia Magill. Married Maj. Edwards, C. S. Army. After the war, they settled in Atlanta, Ga. No issue.
VII. Henry Dangerfield Magill, son of Col. Charles Magill, and Mary Buckner Thruston, his wife, married Ann Elizabeth Mason, daughter of Temple Mason, of “Temple Hall,” Loudoun Co., Va. On May 15, 1847, Dr. Henry D. Magill was instantly killed by a fall from his horse, while on his round of professional duties. A friend wrote of him-“A noble and almost perfect specimen of a man, in mind, person and character, a successful and accomplished physician, descended on both sides from the best Revolutionary stock, but, above all, was his constant walk in the footsteps of Christ.” Bishop Meade, in his “Old Churches and Families,” speaks of the loveliness of Dr. Magill’s character. Issue:
I. Thomas Henry Magill. Married -, and lives in Louisiana.
II. Ann Magill. Married Mr. Sparrow, son of Dr. Sparrow, who for many years was Professor at the Episcopal Theological Seminary, near Alexandria, Va. She d. 1895, without issue. One of Mrs. Ann (Magill) Sparrow’s ancestors was Col. George Mason, member of Parliament, in the reign of Charles I, of England, and first of his family in America. (Mason Family, Volume II, Chapter XVII.)
VIII. Mary Buckner Thruston Magill, daughter of Charles Magill and Mary Buckner Thruston, his wife; b. 1810; d. 1890. She was a devoted church woman, lovely in character and possessed of voice of rare sweetness and power; married, 1831, Robert Lee Randolph, of “Eastern View,” son of Col. Robert Randolph and Elizabeth Carter, of Shirley. Issue elsewhere. (Randolph Family, Volume II, Chapter V.)
IX. Augustine Smith Magill, son of Col. Charles Magill and Mary Buckner Magill (Thruston), his wife; b. 1811. He was an A. M. of the University of Virginia; removed to St. Martinsville, La., and practiced law; married his cousin, Frances Weeks, of St. Martinsville, La. Issue:
I. David Weeks Magill.
II. Mary Ida Magill.
III. Augustine Magill.
IV. Buckner Magill, d. young.

Augustine Smith Magill d. 1852, and his widow married Dr. Pruett. In the summer of 1853, Dr. and Mrs. Pruett, with her two children, Ida and Augustine Magill, went to a much frequented bathing place on Lost Island, on the coast of Louisiana. During a terrific cyclone and tidal wave, the island was submerged, and Mrs. Pruett, the two children, and a brother of Dr. Pruett, were drowned. David Weeks Magill and Dr. John Augustine Smith expected to join the Pruett party, but were delayed by the storm. Their fate, some few weeks later, was equally tragic. Dr. Smith fell from a steamboat, which was approaching Morgan City, and was drowned; David Magill joined the C. S. Army, and died from fever contracted in the service.